(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual catalog"




L161— Q-1096 



< ,(' 



^>&^><£*^^^^*S^^^ 



1HE LIORAHr 
««HT€ 8S1T1T OF fttWOIS 



HGA^ALOGUEf 



OF 



Bieldle Un : Versity, 

GharloWs, J\. G. 



^1883-84^ 



-^s«-*%£*-»**£*-»-?^%?*^4^^ 







































The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the library from 
which it was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books 
are reasons for disciplinary action and may 
result in dismissal from the University. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



JUN- 3| 

MAY 2 019)5 




U. b 



V> jREC'D OCT 29 jb84 

ffiftejeutfo 
1883*4. 



m tlxje 



Hwiwrsitxj ©aljeuxlar- 



THEOLOGICAL, COLLEGIATE, AND PREPARATORY 
DEPARTMENTS. 

1884. 

Tuesday, April 29th, 8 P. M., Junior Exhibition. 

Wednesday, April 30th, A. M., Graduating Exercises of Theo- 
logical Department. 

Wednesday, April 30th, P. M., Dedication of New University 
Building. 

May 29th and 30th, Annual Examinations. 

Sabbath, June 1st, Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Wednesday, June 4th, Fifteenth Annual Commencement. 

1884—5. 

Tuesday, September 30th, Examination of Applicants for Ad- 
mission. 

Wednesday, October 1st, 9 A. M., Fall Term begins. 

Tuesday and Wednesday, December 23d and 24th, Term Ex- 
aminations. 

Wednesday, December 24th, Fall Term ends. 

Winter Vacation, nine days. 

Friday, January 2d, Winter Term begins. 

Thursday, January 29th, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

Thursday and Friday, March 26th and 27th, Examinations. 

Friday, March 27th, 7 P. M., Joint Exhibition of Literary So- 
cieties. 

Friday, March 27th, Winter Term ends. 

Monday, March 30th, Spring Term begins. 

Wednesday-Friday, May 27th-29th, Term Examinations. 

Sabbath, May 31st, Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Tuesday, June 2d, P. M., Alumnus Address. 

" 7 P. M., Junior Class Exhibition. 

Wednesday, June 3d, Sixteenth Annual Commencement. 






gtad of %msUzs. 



Rev. S. MATTOON, D. D., Charlotte, N. C. 

Rev. LUKE DORLAND, Concord, N. C. 

Rev. A. S. BILLINGSLEY, Statesville, N. 0. 

Rev. WILLARD RICHARDSON, Winnsboro', S. C. 

Rev. S. LOOMIS, Chester, S. C. 

Rev. J. H. SHEDD, Oroomiah, Persia. 

Rkv. R. M. HALL, Charlotte, N. C. 

Rev. D. J. SANDERS, Wilmington, N. C. 

Rev. S. J. BEATTY, Charlotte, N. C. 

Rev. THOMAS LAWRENCE, D. D., Charlotte, N. C. 

Rev. JAMES ALLISON, D. D., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

JAMES B. LYON, Esq., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

JOHN C. McCOMBS, Esq., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

R. S. DAVIS, Esq., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

E. NYE HUTCHISON, M. D., Charlotte, N. C. 

Gen. RUFUS BARRINGER, Charlotte, N. C. 

Rev. W. R. COLES, Aiken, S. C. 



©£fio>rs* 



Rev. S. LOOMIS, President 

Rev. S. MATTOON, D. D., Treasurer 

Rev. S. J. BEATTY, Secretary. 



? 



5318 



%xtcxxtxm (&$mmitU£. 



Rev. S. MATTOON, D. D., President. 

Rev. S. J. BEATTY, Secretary. 

Rev. R. M. HALL. 

Rev. A. 8. BILLINGSLEY. 

Rev. LUKE DORLAND. 

Rev. D. J. SANDERS. 

Rev. THOMAS LAWRENCE, D. J). 



ffitratiJte (&ammx\\zt< 



Rev. JAMES ALLISON, D. D. 
JAMES B. LYON, Esq. 
JOHN C. McCOMBS, Esq. 
R. S. DAVIS, Esq. 



ffatxtliij. 



Rev. S. MATTOON, D. D., 

President, and Professor of Theology, Church History, and Church Government. 

Rev. THOMAS LAWRENCE, D. D., 

Professor of Homiletics, Biblical Exegesis, and Greek. 

Rev. R. M. HALL, A. M., 

Professor of Philosophy and Higher Mathematics. 

Rev. S. J. BEATTY, A. M., 

Professor of Latin, Natural Sciences, and Hebrew. 

EUGENE P. SEMPLE, A. M., 

Principal of Preparatory Department. 

WM. E. HUTCHISON, 

Assistant Professor of Greek and Mathematics. 

JOHN P. DAVIS, A. B., 

Assistant Professor of Latin and English Literature. 

GEORGE L. WHITE, 

Professor of Vocal Music and Superintendent of Boarding Department. 

Mrs. H. A. HENRY, 

Matron. 

E. P. SEMPLE, 

Librarian. 

JOHN P. DAVIS, 

Assistant Librarian. 

ANTHONY ROBERTSON, 
SAMUEL B. PRIDE, 
HAMPTON S. THOMPSON. 
STEWART B. YOUNG, 
JOHN S. HEMPHILL, 

Assistant Instructors in English. 

Prof. S. J. BEATTY, 

Secretary of Faculty. 



Biddle University. 



^hcoloQxtwl jDqwrtttteut 



ADMISSION. 



This Department is open to pious young men of all denomina- 
tions. Candidates for admission must produce good evidence that 
they are members in good and regular standing in some Evangeli- 
cal Church; that they possess competent talent; and that they 
have regularly graduated at some College or University, or that in 
some other way they have received an equivalent for the training 
of a College Course. Applicants for admission to an advanced 
standing must present a dismission from some other Theological 
Seminary, or be prepared for examination on subjects which have 
been passed by the class which they desire to enter. 

In exceptional cases, promising young men who have not had 
the benefit of a full College Course will be received, and will be 
allowed to pursue an Eclectic Course. 

The practical work of the ministry is joined with study, as the 
theological students have opportunities of laboring as catechists in 
the neighboring churches during vacation and term time. 

The regular course of study covers three full years. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Hebrew. — Grammar (Green), Genesis. 

Theology. — Hodge's Outlines. 

G-reek Exegesis. — Gospel of Mark. 

Sacred History. — Wheeler's Analysis of Old Testament History 



Biddle University. 



MIDDLE YEAR. 



Hebrew Grammar. — (Green), Psalms. 
Systematic Theology. — Hodge. 
Greek Exegesis. — Pauline Epistles. 
Church History. — Kurtz's Manual. 
Homiletics. — Broadus. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Pastoral Theology. — Murphy. 

Greek Exegesis. — Pauline Epistles. 

Hebrew Exegesis. — Isaiah. 

Church Government. — Hodge on the Confession of Faith. 

Weekly Exercises in Sermonizing are begun in the Junior Year, 
and continue throughout the course. 




Biddle University. 



GMIcgc Jkpavtmcnt. 



The College Department embraces two courses of study, the 
Classical and the Scientific; the latter omitting the study of the 
Classics. Students completing the Classical Course satisfactorily 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts; those completing the 
Scientific Course, that of Bachelor of Science. Candidates for 
admission to the Freshman Class are examined in the studies pre- 
scribed in our Preparatory Course, or their equivalent in case of 
those coming from other schools. For advanced standing, the 
candidates, in addition to the preparatory studies, will be examined 
in those previously studied by the class he wishes to enter, or others 
equivalent to them. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

Freshman Year, 
first term. 

Latin. — Virgil, and Latin Grammar, (Harkness), Latin Prose 
Composition, (Allen). 

Greek. — Homer, Books I. and II., Greek Grammar, (Goodwin). 
Mathematics. — Geometry, (Wentworth). 
General History.— Swinton's Outlines. 

SECOND TERM. 

Latin. — Virgil, Books IV. -VI., Latin Grammar, Latin Prose 
Composition, (Allen). 

Greek. — Homer, Books III. and IV., Greek Grammar. 

Mathematics. — Geometry. 

General History. — Swinton's Outlines. 

THIRD TERM. 

Latin. — Cicero, and Latin Grammar. 

Greek. — Xenophon's Memorabilia, and Greek Grammar. 

Mathematics. — Geometry. 

General History. — Swinton's Outlines. 



Biddle University. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Sophomore Year. 

first term. \ 

Latin. — Tacitus, Agricola. 
Greek. — Xenophon's Memorabilia. 
Mathematics. — Plane Trigonometry, (Davies). 
Natural Science. — Physiology, (Steele). 

SECOND TERM. 

Latin. — Tacitus, Germania. 

Greek. — Herodotus. 

Mathematics. — Spherical Trigonometry, (Davies) 

Natural Science. — Physics, (Gage). 

THIRD TERM. 

Latin. — Livy. 
Greek. — Demosthenes. 
Mathematics. — Surveying, (Davies). 
Natural Science. — Botany, (Wood). 



Junior Year. 

first term. 
Latin. — Horace, Odes. 
Greek. — Plato. 

Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry, (Davies). 
Rhetoric— (Hill.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Latin. — Horace, Satires and Epistles. 
Greek. — Prometheus Vinctus. 
Mathematics. — Astronomy, (Loomis). 
Physical Geography. — (Guyot). 

THIRD TERM. 

Latin. — Cicero, De Xatura Deorum. 
Greek. — Greek Testament. 
Mathematics. — Astronomy, (Loomis). 
Physical Geography. — (Guyot). 



10 Bid die University. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Senior Year. 



FIRST TERM. 



Mental Philosophy. — Porter's Human Intellect and Lectures. 
English Literature. — (Brooke). 
Logic. — McCosh's Manual. 
Chemistry. — (Steele). 



SECOND TERM. 



Moral Philosophy. — Gregory's Ethics and Lectures. 
Evidences of Christianity. — (Alexander). 
Political Economy. — (Champlin). 
Zoology, (Steele). 



THIRD TERM. 



Butler's Analogy. 

Civil Governments. — (Young). 

Moral Philosophy. — Gregory's Ethics and Lectures. 



Biddle University. 1 1 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Freshman Year, 
same studies three terms, 
Mathematics. — Algebra and Geometry, (Wentworth 
G-eneral History. — Swinton's Outlines. 
Bible. — Daily Lessons. 

Sophomore Year, 
first term. 
Mathematics. — -Plane Trigonometry, (Davies). 
Natural Science.— Physiology, (Steele). 
English. — Rhetoric, (Hill). 

SECOND TERM. 

Mathematics. — Spherical Trigonometry, (Davies). 
Natural Science. — Physics, (Gage), and 
Physical Geography. — (Guyot). 

third term. 
Mathematics. — Surveying, (Davies) . 
Natural Science. — Botany, (Wood), and 
Physical G-eography. — (Guyot) . 

Junior Year, 
first term. 
Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry, (Davies). 
Natural Science. — Chemistry, (Steele). 
Bookkeeping. — (Smith and Martin). 

SECOND TERM. 

Mathematics. — Astronomy, (Loom is). 

Political Science. — Champlin's Political Economy. 

Natural History. — Zoology, (Steele). 

THIRD TERM. 

Mathematics. — Astronomy, (Loomis). 
Political Science. — Civil Government. 
Natural History. — Zoology, (Steele). 



12 



Middle University, 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Senior Yea it. 

FIRST TERM. 



Mental Philosophy.- Porter's Human Intellect and Lectures 
Engluh.— English Literature, (Brooke). 
Logic— McCosh's Manual. 



SECOND TERM. 



Mental Philosophy.- Porter's Human Intellect and Lecture 
Moral Philosophy.— Gregory's Ethics and Lectures. 
Evidences of Christianity.— (Alexander). 
Sacred mstory.-Wheehr's Analysis of Old Testament History. 



THIRD TERM. 



Moral Philosophy.— Gregory's Ethics and Lectures. 
Butler's Analogy, 

Sacred History.-WheeWs Analysis of Old Testament History. 



Throughout the College Course there is a weekly recitation in 
the BAle, e,ther Enghsh or Greek; also, throughout the course 
exercses in English Composition and Declamation. Beginning 
next year special studies in English will be pursued throughout 
the course. & 



Biddle University. 13 



The Preparatory Department aims to prepare the student tho- 
roughly for the studies of either course of the College Department. 

For the present, the Elementary English Course is a necessity, 
as the large majority of students coming to us have not had oppor- 
tunity to ground themselves in the common English branches. 
Upon completing the studies of this course, the student is prepared 
to teach common school. He is also ready to enter upon either of 
the two higher courses of the Department: the Classical Course of 
three years, or the Scientific of two years. The Principal and two 
Professors give their entire time to the work of instruction in this 
Department. They are assisted by students of advanced standing, 
selected with special reference to their fitness for teaching. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Junior Year, 
first term. 
Latin. — Jones' Latin Lessons and Latin Grammar, (Harkness). 
English. — Higher Lessons, (Reed & Kellogg), and Composi- 
tions, Spelling. 

Mathematics. — Felter's Arithmetic. 
Bible. — Daily Lessons. 

SECOND TERM. 

Latin. — Latin Lessons, (Jones), and Latin Grammar, (Harkness). 
English. — Higher Lessons, (Reed & Kellogg), and Compositions, 
Spelling. 

Mathematics. — Felter 's Arith metic. 
Bible. — Daily Lessons. 

THIRD TERM. 

Latin. — Jones 7 Latin Lessons completed, and Latin Grammar, 
(Harkness). 

English. — Higher Lessons completed, with Compositions, 
Spelling. 

Mathematics. — Felter's Arithmetic completed. 

Bible. — Daily Lessons. 



14 Biddle University. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Middle Year. 

MUST TERM. 

Latin. — Fables, Roman History, and Caesar begun, (Book II.,) 
with Latin Grammar. 

Greek. — White's Greek Lessons begun, Greek Grammar, 
(Goodwin). 

Mathematics. — Algebra begun, (Wentworth). 

English. — Compositions. 

Bible. — Daily Lessons. 

SECOND TERM. 

Latin. — Cresar continued, (Books II. and III.,) and Latin 
Grammar. 

Greek. — White's Greek Lessons continued, Greek Grammar, 
(Goodwin). 

Mathematics. — Algebra, ( Wentworth). 

English. — Composi tion s . 

Bible. — Daily Lessons. 

THIRD TERM. 

Latin. — Ca?sar, (Book I.,) and Grammar. 
Greek. — White's Lessons and Greek Grammar. 
Mathematics. — Algebra. 
Bible. — Daily Lessons. 



Biddle University. 15 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Senior Year, 
first term. 



Lathi. — Csesar completed, (Books IV. and V.,) Latin Grammar, 
Latin Prose Composition, (Allen). 

Greek. — Xenophon's Anabasis and Greek Grammar, Exercises 
in Greek Composition. 

Mathematics. — Algebra, (Wentworth). 

English. — Rhetoric, (Kellogg). 

Bible. — Daily Lessons. 



SECOND TERM. 



Latin. — Sallust, (Conspiracy of Cataline,) and Latin Grammar, 
Latin Prose Composition, (Allen). 

Greek. — Xenophon's Anabasis and Greek Grammar, Exercises 
in Greek Composition. 

Mathematics. — Algebra. 

English. — Rhetoric, (Kellogg). 

Bible. — Daily Lessons. 



THIRD TERM. 



Latin. — Sallust or Cicero, and Latin Grammar, Latin Prose 
Composition. 

Greek. — Xenophon's Anabasis completed, and Greek Grammar. 
Mathematics. — Algebra completed. 
English. — Rhetoric, (Kellogg). 
Bible. — Daily Lessons. 



16 Biddle University, 



SCIENTIFIC COUESE. 



Junior Year. 



FIRST TERM. 



English. — Higher Lessons, (Reed and Kellogg), Composition. 
Spelling. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, (Felter). 

Latin. — Harkness' Grammar and Jones' Lessons ; or, 

Swinton's Word- Analysis. 

Bible. — Daily Lessons. 



SECOND TERM. 



English. — Higher Lessons, (Reed and Kellogg), Composition. 
Spelling. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, (Felter). 

Latin. — Harkness' Grammar, Jones' Lessons; or, 

History of England. — (Anderson). 

Bible. — Daily Lessons. 



THIRD TERM. 



English. — Higher Lessons completed, Composition, Spelling. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic completed. 

Latin. — Jones' Lessons completed, Hark n ess' Grammar; or, 

History of England. 

Bible. — Daily Lessons. 



Biddle University. 1 7 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Senior Year, 
first term. 



Mathematics. — Algebra begun, (Wentworth). 
English. — Rhetoric, (Kellogg), Compositions. 
Latin. — Fables, Roman History, Caesar begun, (Harkness), 
Harkness' Grammar, or 

Physiology. — Science Primer. 
Bible. — Daily Lessons. 

SECOND TERM. 

English. — Rhetoric, (Kellogg), Compositions. 
Mathematics. — Algebra continued. 

Latin. — Caesar continued, (Books II. and III.,) Latin Grammar, 
or 

Science of Government.— {Alden). 
Bible. — Daily Lessons. 

THIRD TERM. 

English. — Rhetoric completed, Compositions. 
Mathematics. — Algebra continued to Chapter IX. 
Latin. — Caesar, (Book I.,) Latin Grammar, or 
Primer of Physical Geography. — (Geikie.) 
Bible. — Daily Lessons. 



18 Biddle University. 



%ltmtn\i\xx} %n%Xis\i Course 



ADMISSION. 



All applicants for admission to this Course must be at least 
twelve years of age; must furnish satisfactory testimonials of good 
moral character, and must be able to pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion in the Third Reader, Primary Geography, and Arithmetic to 
Fractions. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Fourth Reader, (Appleton); Arithmetic to Decimals, (Felter); 
Geography, (Maury's Manual) with Map Drawing; Spelling, Pen- 
manship, Daily Bible Lessons. 



SECOND YEAR. 



Fifth Reader, (Appleton); Grammar, Graded Lessons, (Reed 
and Kellogg) ; Arithmetic to Percentage, Geography completed, 
(Maury's Manual) with Map Drawing, Spelling, Penmanship, 
Bible. 



THIRD YEAR. 



Fifth Reader, (Appleton) ; Grammar, (Reed and Kellogg's 
Higher Lessons) ; United States History, (Barnes); Arithmetic to 
Ratio; Spelling, Penmanship, Bible. 



Biddle University. 19 



(Sjetxcral Ittftfrmatixm* 



SCHOOL YEAR. 



The School Year consists of one session of three terms, com- 
mencing on the first Wednesday of October, and closing on the 
first Wednesday of June. Students wishing to enter should make 
early application. 

The best interests of the institution and of the student personally, 
require that he report himself for duty promptly at the opening of 
each session. 

BOARDING DEPARTMENT. 

A Boarding House, modelled on the idea of a Christian home, 
has been established for the accommodation of students from 
abroad. 

This is under the care of Prof. Geo. L. White and his efficient 
Avife, assisted by the three Junior Professors. Students are 
required to board in the Department, unless excused by the Faculty. 

Logan Hall. — The old college building has been thoroughly 
renovated and enlarged, and is newly furnished throughout. It 
contains rooms for 70 students, and ample dining room, laundry and 
kitchen accommodations for 150. This building receives its name 
in honor of Rev. S. C. Logan, D. D., the first Secretary of the 
Board of Missions for Freedmen. 

The other two old Dormitory Buildings will be refitted and 
refurnished during the summer vacation. When this is done, 
comfortable accommodations will be provided for 150 boarders. 

Regulations. — The rules are few and such as are required in 
every well regulated household. 

The use of ardent spirits, wine, or beer, except as medicine, 
tobacco in any form, profanity, and games of chance are prohibited. 



20 Biddle University. 



Parents and friends are requested not to send boxes of food, 
pastry or sweetmeats to students. Such things are unnecessary, 
injurious to health, and the money they cost can be put to better 
use. 

The Boarding House will be opened one week previous to the 
beginning of the Fall Term, and will close one week after Com- 
mencement. Students desiring to remain during the summer, will 
be assisted in finding suitable boarding places. 

UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS. 

In addition to the buildings mentioned above, there are on the 
College Campus, the homes of the President and of the three Senior 
Professors, and the new University Building. (See frontispiece). 
This structure, just completed at a cost of $40,000, is 98 x 67 feet, 
three stories high, with an annex for chapel 66 x 45 feet. The 
whole is of substantial brick, of pleasing appearance, furnishing 
12 recitation rooms, each 34 x 24 feet, two society halls, an 
audience chamber capable of seating 600, and roomy and well 
ventilated halls, with an abundance of light throughout. 

The heating apparatus is after the most approved plan. The 
school and chapel furniture is neat and substantial. 

The funds for the erection of this building were secured by a 
member of the Faculty, under the auspices of the f reedmen's 
Board of Missions. It will no doubt be gratifying to the friends 
who have so generously contributed to its erection, to know that it 
is the expectation to dedicate it shortly, and that too free of debt. 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

A large airy room on the first floor has been set apart as a 
Library and Reading Room. It will be open daily, and accessible 
to all. Here will be found a library of about 2,500 volumes, 
a valuable addition of new and standard works having recently 
been made to it through the generosity of a friend. 

The Beading Room contains files of some of our leading news- 
papers and magazines. 



Biddle University. 21 



LITERAEY SOCIETIES. 

Two Literary Societies are in successful operation. These are 
the Philologian and Clariosophic. Their weekly meetings furnish 
opportunities for training in elocution and extemporaneous speaking. 

RHETORICAL EXERCISES. 

Recitations are suspended on Friday afternoons, and all the 
students meet by divisions for exercises in declamation and com- 
position, under the supervision of two professors. 

DAILY RECITATIONS, ETC. 

Recitations are three fourths of an hour in length. The 
students of all departments meet together for devotional exercises 
in the chapel at the beginning of each day's work. 

COLLEGE Y. M. C. A. 

A College Branch of the Y. M. C. A. is in active operation, with 
a membership of over 100. It is earnestly desired that all identify 
themselves with this noble work. 

REQUIREMENTS. 

All students are expected to attend Sabbath School in the 
chapel on the morning of each Lord's Day ; Divine services in the 
evening, conducted by one of the professors ; meetings for prayer 
Tuesday and Saturday evenings, and the devotional exercises at 
the opening of each daily session. 

Students are required to work one hour each day in keeping the 
buildings in order and improving the grounds. 

EXPENSES, BOARD, ETC. 

Tuition is free. For contingent expenses, a fee of $1.50 per 
term, payable in advance, is collected from students not in the 
Boarding Department. 



22 Biddle University. 



Board, including furnished rooms, washing, light and fuel, is 
$10.00 per calendar month, payable monthly in advance. Boarders 
are not received for less than one month, and no deduction can \>c 
made for absence, unless ordered by the Faculty. 

Candidates for the ministry, and young men of promise, will 
receive such aid as their necessities and the resources at command 
will allow. Friends in Scotland have established a fund of over 
$6,000, the interest of which is to be used for preparing young men 
for mission work in Africa. 

LOCATION AND DESIGN IN THE ESTABLISHMENT 
OF THE INSTITUTION. 

The University is located at Charlotte, N. C, and receives its 
name in memory of the late Major Henry J. Biddle, of Philadel- 
phia, whose widow, Mrs. Mary D. Biddle, has been one of its first 
and most liberal supporters. It is chartered by the Legislature of 
the State, and under the auspices of the Presbyterian Board of 
Missions for Freedmen. 

The object of the institution is the education of colored teachers 
and preachers. 

It stands at the terminus of six railroads, in the midst of a dense 
and comparatively intelligent colored population, occupying a com- 
manding site of 24 acres in the suburbs of the city in Jhe midst of 
a beautiful grove. 

It is situated in the very heart of the Synod of Atlantic, which 
embraces the whole South Atlantic States, having 161 colored 
churches, 96 ministers, mostly colored, 6Q young men of color in 
preparation for the ministry, with a large number of schools and 
academies under its care. These schools and churches must be 
furnished with intelligent Christian teachers, who must be largely 
educated on the field and in contact with the people among whom 
they are to labor. Such a training is less expensive than if had 
elsewhere ; it gives the student the best opportunities for a liberal 
education, and affords him the refining influence of a Christian 
home, keeping him at the same time in contact and sympathy with 
his people. 



Biddle University. 23 



No institution of learning in the country offers the colored youth 
superior facilities for a liberal education, and perhaps none equals 
it in the practical training of the young minister. Whilst aiming 
to give him as far as practicable, a thorough classical and scientific 
training, great attention is paid to Bible study and experimental 
religion. 

The student looking towards the ministry is employed on the 
Sabbath, during his college and seminary years, in doing the work 
of a catechist or evangelist in some of the numerous churches 
organized by the Faculty in the adjacent region of North and South 
Carolina. 

CHARACTER OF THE YOUNG MEN. 

Of the students whose names are found in this catalogue, one 
hundred and twenty-four are professing Christians; fifty-seven are 
studying for the ministry ; fourteen are Catechists, or Preachers ; 
seventy-four have taught school during some portion of the year, 
earning thereby upwards of $4,700. In the schools taught, were 
5,281 children, and in the Sabbath Schools under their superin- 
tendence, were over 2,600. 

TESTIMONY OF FREEDMEN'S BOARD. 

The importance, in the eyes of the Church, of the interests 
which Biddle University represents, is forcibly put in the language 
of a recent circular addressed to the churches on its behalf by the 
Board of Missions for Freedrnen. 

"What is done," say they, "for Biddle University, will, in a 
" great measure, determine the success of our whole work among 
" the Freedrnen. It furnishes our only hope of educating native 
" teachers and preachers on the field. Indifference to Biddle 
" University is indifference to our whole work among the Freed- 
" men. If liberally supported, no missionary undertaking will 
" return speedier and more abundant fruit. Where are the men 
" and women who will build up this Institution for the glory of 
"God and the good of a needy race?" 



24 Biddle University. 



WANTS OF THE INSTITUTION. 

1st. In the language of the Secretary of the Freedmens Board, : 
"Permanent Endowment Funds for the adequate support of the 

"Professors, is an imperative necessity." $5,000 has been secured 
for the endowment of the President's chair. 

2d. We shall be compelled during the present year to make 
certain improvements. It will be necessary to purchase twenty- 
five acres or more of land, in addition to the present campus, in 
order to prevent encroachment upon our premises. The two old 
domitories, to which reference has been made, ynust be repaired 
and refurnished. We are also desirous of organizing a Labor 
Department, where the young men may be taught the elements of 
industry and the use of tools. In the accomplishment of these 
and other necessary improvements, $10,000 could be judiciously 
expended. 

3d. Scholarships. The establishment of $100 Scholarships, to 
enable needy and promising students in the higher departments 
to pursue their studies, continuously, through the College Year. 
In addition to this, a few hundred dollars to be placed in the hands 
of the Faculty, to be used at its discretion, in aiding needy and 
worthy students, is a great desideratum. 

4th. Donations of Clothing, for distribution among needy 
students, are earnestly solicited. t 

5th. Useful Books for the library are much needed. Works of 
reference, biography, history and science are particularly desired. 
A Library Fund is much needed, that there may be purchases 
made from time to time of new and valuable books. For a " work- 
ing" library, such a fund in the hands of the Librarians is an 
imperative loant. 

CONCLUSION. 

No Institution under the care of the Presbyterian Church has 
a wider field or greater opportunities. Its students are gathered 
from all the South Atlantic States, and are scattered in their 
school and church work through all this vast region, and as far 



Biddle University. 25 



west as Texas. It has the strongest possible claims upon the 
prayers and benevolence of the Church. It is fast becoming a 
tender bond of union between Northern Presbyterians and their 
Southern brethren. In proof of the estimation in which it is 
held by prominent Southern men, see the following extract from 
a letter of Hon. Z. B. Vance, United States Senator from North 
Carolina : — 

Charlotte, Sept. 28th, 1882. 
" * * * I am well acquainted with Biddle University, and I think it 
" better circumstanced to do good than any other Institution of the kind in the 
"South. The whole people of the region are fully in accord with it objects." 

From Rev. Drury Lacey, D. D., late President of Davidson 
College, N. C. :— 

"I firmly believe that Biddle University is doing a greater work for Missions, 
" foreign and domestic, than any mission at home or abroad." 

From Dr. E. Nye Hutchison :— 

Charlotte, Oct. 3d, 1882. 

"It is my earnest prayer that some liberal Presbyterian may fully endow 
" Biddle University, and make it not only useful to its generation at home, but 
" a blessing to the world." 

The institution is consecrated to the glory of God and the 
welfare of a needy race. It stands as the only representative of its 
kind in the South, of our Presbyterian Church j and it certainly 
is one of the most important agencies in the hands of the Church 
for the accomplishment of good among the six millions of Freed- 
men in the South. It commends itself to the prayers and gifts of 
all good men. 

Contributions to any of the objects above named may be sent to 
the Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. 

Rev. S. MATTOON, President, 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Or to the Rev. James Allison, D. D., Pittsburgh, Pa., Treasurer 
of the Presbyterian Board of Missions for Freed men. 



26 Biddle University. 



Cvatalagttc of JStutlents, 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Irby D. Davis, A. B., . Laurens, S. C. 

George S. Leeper, A. B., Woodlawn, N. C. 

Wm. Eugene Partee, A. B., Concord, N. C. 
—3— 



MIDDLE CLASS. 



David Brown, A. B., . . Salisbury, N. C. 

George W. White, . Sumter, S. C. 

Wade H. Coleman, . . Newberry, S. C. 

— 3— 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

* Furman L. Brodie, . . Onarga, 111. 
Abner F. Graham, . Coddle Creek, N. C. 
Henry H. Haskins, . . Columbus, Ga. 
Frank B. Perry, . . Lancaster, S. C. 
Hampton S. Thompson, . Camden, S. C. 

* Simeon F. Young, . . Sumter, S. C. 

—6— 

* Irregular. 



Biddle University. 



27 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



* Edward Davidson, 
Augustus U. Frierson, 
Levi S. Hurdle, 
Frank Laney, 

t Benjamin F. Murray, 
Anthony Robertson, 
Joseph B. Sevelli, 



Charlotte, N. C. 
Sumter, S. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Macon, Ga. 
Mebanesville, N. C. 
Eden, S. C. 
St. Augustine, Fla. 



-7— 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



* Edward W. Carpenter, 
Albert A. Dryer, 

t William Hairston, 
John S. Hemphill, 

* Judge Knox, 
George J. Melton, . 
Andrew N. Richey, 
Manson Riley, 
Samuel J. Spencer, 
Samuel J. Wentz, 
Joseph S. Williams, 



Ansonville, N. C. 
Fleming, Ga. 
Salem, N. C. 
Chester, S. C. 
Sharon, N. C. 
Mechanicsville, S. C. 
Belton, S. C. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Cheraw, S. C. 
Coburn's Store, N. C. 
Spartanburg, S. C. 



•11 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Preston Brown, 
f Andrew P. Butler, 
f Benjamin L. Glenn, 
f Wade H. Grifpen, 

Lindsay Hunley, 
t Isaac M. Young, . 



Charlotte. 
Laurens, S. C. 
Winnsboro', S. C. 
Blackstock, S. C. 
Mocksville, N. C. 
Shufordsville, S. C. 



* Irregular. 



t Scientific. 



28 



Biddle University. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



Classical Course. 

senior year. 

Albert M. Caldwell 
William A. Griffen, 
Leander Hayes, 
Albert B. Haynes, 
James D. Martin, 
f Tink A. McEachen, 
Samuel B. Pride, 
John A. Ramseur, 
Samuel J. Sumter, 
David T. Thompson, 
Jonas W. White, 
Stewart B. Young, 

—12— 



Charlotte. 

Laurens, S. ( '. 
Charlotte. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Mechanics ville, S. C. 
Charlotte. 
Monroe, 8. C. 
Lincolnton. 
Mechanics ville, S. C. 
Fountain Inn, S. C. 
Rock Hill, S. C 
Due West, S. C. 



MIDDLE YEAR. 



James A. Byrd, 
Emmet A. Black, 
James A. Garland, . 
Samuel J. Hargrave, 
Benjamin Harren, 
* George S. Hayes, 
Jack J. Johnson, . 
John C. Johnson, 
George W. King, 
Irwin M. Muldrow, , 
Walter T. Reid, 
Hardy J. Ryan, 
Isaac D. Shepard, 
Albert J. Tate, 
Charles E. Willis, 

* Irregular. 



•15- 



Laurens, S. C. 
Cowan's Ford. 
Danville, Va. 
Harrisburg. 
Shufords ville! 
Huntersville. 
Sumter, S. C. 
Chester, S. C. 
Yorkville, S. C. 
Mayesville, S. C. 
Macon, Ga. 
Cheraw, S. C. 
Charlotte. 
Mebanesville. 
Wilmington, S. C. 

f Scientific. 



Biddle University. 



29 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Nathan Bell, 
Harry Bernard, . 
James M. Boger, 
Charles H. Burton, 
James N. Burton, 
Hampton C. Caldwell, 
John N. Carter, 
Daniel D. Davis, . 
George J. Foster, 
John E. Foster, . 
Adam Gaillard, 
James J. Grier, 
William W. Halloway, 
Napoleon Houser, 
James S. Hill, 
Lewis P. Jenkins, 
Sidney A. Knox, 
Prince Albert Knox, 
Samuel Mahaffey, 
John W. Maningault, 
John W. McCrea, 
Levi J. Melton, 
Neil F. McEachen, 
John H. Moore, . 
Peter L. Moore, 
Charles J. Palmer, 
Wm. J. Rankin, 
Wm. H. Roan, 
Pinckney W. Russell 
Charles W. Sadgwar, 
Thomas M. Stokes, 
Samuel C. Thompson, 
Johnson F. White, 



Winsboro', S. C. 
Wilmington. 
Concord. 
Davidson College. 

Charlotte. 
u 

Laurens, S. C. 
Greenville, S. C. 
Fork Church. 
Ridgeway, S. C. 
Pineville. 
Wilmington. 
Charlotte. 
Jonesville, S. C. 
Welford, S. C. 
Cowan's Ford. 
Sharon. 

Greenville, S. C. 
Providence, S. C. 
Concord. 

Mechanicsville, S. C. 
Laurinburgh, S. C. 
Waterloo, S. C. 
Blackstock, S. C. 
Belton, S. C. 
Salisbury. 
Greensboro'. 
Newberry, S. C. 
Wilmington. 
Vance's Ferry, S. C. 
Winnsboro, S. C. 
Charlotte. 



—33— 



30 



Biddle University. 



ELEMENTARY ENGLISH COURSE. 



THIRD YEAR. 

George W. Anderson, 
Richard H. Blount, 
Lacey Booker, 
John C. Brown, 
Augustus A. Butl.ee, 
Samuel A. Caeuthees, 
Chaeles Cannon, 
Dock Cooke, . 
Elbeet C. Dawkins, 
Peaeson C. Davis, 
Junius Fox, 

William Lawten Geiffen, 
Isaiah E. Haedy, 

PlNCKNEY HENDEESON, 

Geoege W. Higgins, 
Edwaed R. Hayes, . 
William E. Housee, 
Daniel Hoopee, 
John W. Hunley, 
James James, . 
James A. Johnson, 
D. Feanklin King, . 
Jesse E. Locke, . 
Fletchee McNeil, 

ROBEET A. MlLLEE, 

Samuel O. Nelson, . 
Thomas M. Oglesby, 
Oeein H. Oxendine, 
Bailey M. Peguese, 
James H< Ponds, 
Lee Ramseue, 
Wm. A. Richey, 



Mechanicsville, S. C. 
Charlotte. 
Charlotte. 

Pacolet Depot, S. C. 
Charlotte. 
Charlotte. 
Concord. 
Centreville, S. C. 
Prosperity, S. C. 
Clinton, S. C. 
Paw Creek. 
Greenwood, S. C. 
Cheraw, S. C. 
Charlotte. 
Statesville. 
Huntersville. 
Davidson College. 
Denver. 
Mocksville. 
Charlotte. 
Davidson College. 
Statesville. 
Plain, S. C. 
Lumberton. 
Burkeville, Va. 
Ridgeway, S. C. 
Buckhead, S. C. 
Lumberton. 
Cheraw, S. C. 
Charlotte. 
Lincolton. 
Belton, S. C. 



Biddle University. 



31 



Benjamin Sanford, 
John G. Sanford, 
Mitchell H. Thompson, . 
John R. Torrence, . 
Henry R. Williams, 
Robert W. Williamson, 
Calvin M. Young, 

—39— 



Davidson College. 
Davidson College. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Davidson College. 
Doaksville, I. T. 
Ringgold, Va. 
Due West, S. C. 



SECOND YEAR. 



William Banks, . 
Ephraim L. Black, . 
Matthew Booer, 
Robert Booker, 
James Brown, 
John B. Broadaway, . 
Francis Hazel Butler, 
John C. Cantey, 
Price Coker, 
Franklin Davenport, 
James H. Davis, . 
Wm. J. Davis, 
Ernest M. Dixon, 
Samuel Fewell, 
James Foster, 
John C. Hall, 
Isaac Harrington, 
Henry Hayden, 
Lewis Johnson, 
Benjamin James, 
Allen Lewis, 
Wm. Fletcher Marks, 
Andrew McClary, 
Bradford L. McCorkle, 
Leroy McClure, . 
James McKnight, 



Charlotte. 

Cowan's Ford. 

Concord. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Diamond Hill. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Lowesville. 

Paw Creek. 

Pineville. 

Charlotte. 

Rock Hill. 

Charlotte. 

Doaksville, I. T. 

Bennettsville, S. C. 

Charlotte. 

Triangle. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Paw Creek. 

SherrilFs Ford. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 



32 



Biddle University. 



Lewis Moore, 
John Morris, . 
William Nance, 
Wm. Giles Patterson, 
William Plummer, 
John Reinhart, 
Washington J. Rich, 
Richard Sadler, 
Hugh Z. Smart, . 
Daniel C. Stubbs, 
John W. Young, . 
Samuel L. Young, 



Charlotte. 
Charlotte. 
Goklville, S. C. 
Pine Grove, 8. C. 
Charlotte. 
Catawba Station. 
Sumter, S. C. 
Steel Creek. 
Pineville. 

Bennettsville, S. C. 
Clinton, S. C. 
Due West, S. C. 



-38- 



FIRST YEAR. 



Robert A. Alexander, 
Albert Barnes, 
Sumner M. Boston, 
Squire Freeman, . 
Israel Harris, 
Hampden McCall, 
Sumter L. May, 
Joseph Surratt, . 
* Abram S. Simmons, 
Albert Torrence, 
William Wallace, 
Melton J. Warren, 
Dallas Wilson, 
Amzi Withers, 

* Deceased. 



Springsville. 

Charlotte. 

Newberry, S. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Steel Creek. 

Charlotte. 

Martinsville. 

Sumter, S. C, 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Concord. 

Steel Creek. 



C. 



14— 



Biddle University. 33 



JiHmmary* 



I. THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Senior Class, . . . . .3 

Middle Class, .... 3 



II. COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

Senior Year, . . . . .6 

Junior Year, ..... 7 

Sophomore Year, . . . . .11 

Freshman Year, .... 6 



IK. PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

1. CLASSICAL COURSE. 



6 



30 



Senior Year, . 


12 


Middle Year, .... 


15 


Junior Year, . 


33 




— 60 


2. ELEMENTARY ENGLISH COURSE. 




Third Year, . 


39 


Second Year, ..... 


38 


First Year, .... 


14 




— 91 




— 151 



Total in all Departments, . . 187 



J@4L#*l*ZU, ?t. <L. 








Wm£ 




we imim 

Of Hif 

CATALOGUE ""^wmwB 



-OF- 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY 



CHARLOTTE. N. C. 



1889-90 






\mjmm^ 



IflttJ call) first 
Journal ^atalogtt 



—4— 



WxMh mnmniih 



4,\\zt{\viU,$.$,. 



1890-91, 



Under the care of the Board of Missions for FreedMeN 
of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 






Term expires June, 1890. 
E. Nye Hutchinson, M. D., Charlotte, N. C. 
Gen. Rufus Barringer, Charlotte, N. C. 
Rev. W. R. Coles, Aiken, 8. C. 

Term expires June, 1891. 
Rev. D. J. Satterfield, D. D., Concord, N. C. 
Rev. A. 8. Rillingsley, Statesville, N. C, 
Rev. J. Y. Fair, D. D., Richmond, Va. 
Rev. S. Loomk, Chester, 8. C. 
John E. Oates, Esq., Charlotte, N. C. 

Term expires June, 1892. 
Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., Willmingtcn, N. C. 
Rev. James Allison, D. D., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Robert S. Davis, Esq., Pittsburg, Pa. 
J. C. McCombs, Esq., Pittsburg, Pa. 
S. Watson Reid, Esq., Charlotte, N. C 



m 



iccr.'i 



Rev. A. S. Billingsley, President 
Rev. W. F. Johnson, D. D. r Treasurer. 
Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D. Secretary. 



ratittji 



Rev. W. F. Johnson, D. D., 
President, and Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Homileiics. 

Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D. D., 
Professor of He brew and Greek Exegesis. 

Rev. Carroll Cutler, D. D,, 

Professor of Theology and Church Government 

Rev. Samuel J. Beatty, A. M., 

Professor of Natural History, and Superintendent of Manual 

Training Department. 

Eugene P. Semple, A. M., 
Professor of Latin and English, and Principal of Preparatory 

Department 

Rev. W. H. McMeen, A. M,, 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Wm. E. Hutchinson, 

Assistant Professor of Greek and Mathematics. 

Geo. E. Davis, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Latin and English. 

Rev. Thomas D. Duncan, A. M., 

College Pastor and Superintendent of Home. 

Eugene P. Semple, 
Librarian. 

S. J. Beatty, 
Secretary of Faculty. 



6319 



BlDDliE r.VIVIil'^i'lT. 



Sle©li3igkd ?p!*#8vfm*«tf. 



FACULTY. 

Rev. W. F. Johnson, I). D. 
President, and Professor of Ecclesiastical History and HomUetics. 

Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D. D. 
Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesi*. 

Rev. Carroll Cutler, D. D. 

Professor of Theology and Church Government 



ADMISSION. 



This department is open to young men of all denominations. Can- 
didates for admission must produce evidence that they are members in 
good and regular standing in some evangelical church ; that they possess 
competent talent; and that the) have been regularly graduated at some 
College or University, or that in some way they have received an equiv- 
alent for the training of a college course. Applicants for admission to an 
advanced standing must present a dismission from some other Theolog- 
ical Seminary, or be prepared for examination on the subjects which 
have been pursued by the class which they desire to enter. 

In exceptional cases, promising young men who have not had the 
benefit of a full college course will be received, and will be allowed to 
pursue an eclectic course. 

The practical work of the ministry is joined with study, as the theologi- 
cal students have opportunities of laboring as catechists in the neighbor- 
ing churches during vacation and term time. 

The regular course of study covers three full years. 



BlDDLE UnIVE'KSITY 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



Junior Year. 

H ebrew. — Grammar, and Manual, Harper. 

Theology, Hodge' s Outlines. 

Greek Exegesis, The Gospels . 

Sacred History. 

Middle Year. 

He:;rew Grammar. — Psalms, Harper. 

Systematic Theology, Hodge' s Outlines. 

Greek Exegesis, The Epistles of St. Paul. 

Church History. 

Homiletics, Broadus. 

senior year. 

Pastoral Theology. 

Greek Exegesis, Pauline Epistles. 

Church Government, 

He srew, Isaiah . 

Weekly Exercises in Sermonizing are begun in the Junior Year, and continue 
throughout the course. 



Biddle University. 



»olkge ieparfmifnt. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Rev. W. F. Johnson, D. D., 

President, and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D. D., 
Professor of Greek. 

Rev. Carroll Cutler, D. D., 
Professor of Ethics, and Evidences of Christianity. 

Rev. Samuel J. Beatty, A. M., 

Professor of Natural History and. Chemistry. 

Eugene P. Semple, A. M., 

Professor of Latin. 

Rev. W. H. McMeen, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Wm. E. Hutchinson, 
Assistant Professor of Greek. 

Geo. E. Davis, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Latin and Natural Science. 

The college department embraces two courses of study, the classical 
and the scientific. Students completing the classical course satisfactori- 
ly receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts ; those completing the Scientific 
Course receive the degree of Bachelor of Science. Candidates for ad- 
mission to the freshman class are examined in the studies prescribed 
in our preparatory course, or their equivalent. 

For advanced standing the candidate, in addition to the preparatory 
studies, will be examined in those previously pursued by the class he 
wishes to enter, or others equivalent to them. 



Biddle University 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Freshman Year. 

Latin, Vergil. 

Grammar, Allen & Greeuough. 

Prose Composition, Allen. 

Greek Xenophoh's Anabasis. 

Grammar, G ood win . 

Mathematics, Geometry, Went wo th . 

History, Outlines, SwLitcn. 

Book-keeping once a week. 



Sophomore Year. 
first and second terms. 

Latin, Horace. 

Greek, Homer. 

Mathematics, Geometry, Went worth. 

Natural Science, Physics Gage. 

third term, 

Latin, Tacitus' Germania. 

Greek, Xenophon's Memorabilia of Stcrates. 

Mathematics, Geometry, Went worth. 

Natural Science, Botany Wood' s. 



Junior Year. 
first term. 

natural science Physical Geography Appleton' s 

Greek, Anacreontics and Plato. 

Mathematics, Plane Trigonometry. 

ENGLisH Classics. 

second term. 

Greek ..* ....Medea. 

Natural Science, / s tronomy , Locky er. 

Mathematics Spherical Trigonometry. 

English Classics. 

third term. 

Greek New Testament . 

Mathematics, Surveying. 

Natural Science, Astronomy, Locky er. 

English Classics. 
One recitation each week in the Bible. 



Biddle University 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Senior Year. 
first term. 

Mental Philosophy Haven, with Lectures. 

English Literature, Shaw. 

Logic, McCoeh. 

Zoology, 

Greek Testament once a week both terms. 

SECOND TERM. 

Mental Philosophy, Haven . 

Evidences of Christianity, Barrows' Companion to the Bible. 

Political Economy, Laughlin. 

Zoology. 

Chemistry, Avery. 

third term. 

Science and Religion, Fraser. 

Civil Government, Young. 

Moral Philosophy Cutler's Beginning of Ethics. 

Chemistry, Avery. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Freshmen Year. 

Mathematics, Algebra and Geometry , Went wort I 

History, Outlines, Swinton. 

Bible, Daily Lessons. 

Latin or Greek. 



Sophomore Year. 

first term. 

Mathematics, Geometry, Wentworth. 

Natural Science, Physics, Gage. 

Physical Geography, Appleton's. 

Latin or Greek. 

second term. 

Mathematics, Geometry, Wentworth. 

Natural Science, Physics, Gage. 

Latin or Greek. 

third term. 

Mathematics, Geometry, Wentworth. 

Natural Science, Botany, Wood's. 

Latin or Greek. 



Biddle University. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE.. 



Junior Year, 
first term. 

MATHEMM ICS, — -. . ...-• Trigonometry, 

Natural Science, . ... Zoology. 

English Literature. 

second term. 

Mathematics....! Astronomy and Trigonometry, 

Political Science, Political Economy, Laughlin. 

Natural Science, ..Zoology, Chemistry, 

third term. 

Mathematics, ,, Astronomy and Surveying. 

Political Science, Civil Government,. Young, 

Natural Science, ..Chemistry, , Avery, 



Senior Year, 
first term. 

Mental Philosophy,..., ., , ,,, ,. Lectures, Haven 

English Classics. 

Logic, > McCosh, 

SECOND TERM. 

Mental Philosophy, Lectures, Haven, 

Moral Philosophy, Janet 

Evidences of Christianity,.... Barrows' Companion to the Bible. 

Sacred History. 

third term. 

Moral Philosophy, >., Janet. 

Science and Religion, > ...... »......* Fraser. 

Sacred History. 



Throughout the College Course there is a weekly recitation in the Bible either 
English or Greek ; also, throughout the course, exercises in English Composition 
and Declamation. 



10 Biddle University. 



jjireptrakrg ^SijiAirtoteui 



FACULTY. 



Rev. W. F. Johnson, D. D., 
President. 

Eugene P. Semple, A. M., 
Principal and Professor of English. 

Wm. E. Hutchinson, 
Assistant Professor of Greek and Mathematics. 

Geo. E. Davis, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Latin and English, 

J. M. BOGEE, 

Assistant Instructor in English. 



The Preparatory Department aims to prepare the student thoroughly 
for the studies of either course of the College Department. For the pres- 
ent, the Elementary English Course is a necessity, as the large majority 
of students coming to the Institution have not had the opportunity to 
ground themselves in the common English branches. Upon completing 
the studies of this course, the student is prepared to teach in the common 
schools of the state. He is also ready to enter upon either of the higher 
courses of the Department. The Professors in this Department are as- 
sisted by students of advanced standing, selected with special reference 
to their fitness for teaching. 



Biddle University. 11 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Junior Year, 

Latin, Lessons Tetlow. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 

English, Higher Lessons, Reed & Kellogg. 

Composition. 

Mathematics, Arithmetic and Algebra, Wentwort h. 

Bible, Daily Lessons. 

Spelling, once a week throughout the year. 



Senior Year, 
first term. 



Latin, Caesar. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 

Greek, Lessons, White. 

Grammar Goodwin. 

Mathematics, Algebra, Wentworth. 

Physiology, Steele. 

Bible Daily Lessons. 

second term. 
Latin, Csesar. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 

Greek, Lessons, White. 

Grammar, Good win. 

Ma thematics, Algebra, Wentworth . 

Bible, Daily Lessons. 

English,.... How to Write Clearly, Abbott. 

third term 
Latin, Sallust. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 

Greek , Lessons, w White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 

Mathematics, Algebra, Wentworth. 

English How to Write Clearly, Abbott. 

Spelling, once a week throughout the year. 



\2 Fiddle DNiVERsiTT. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



English",-. High er Lessons. 

Composition. 

Mathematics, Arithmetic and Algebra,. Wenfvrortfj. 

Bible- Daily Lessons, 

Penmanship and Spelling once a week throughout the year. 



Latin or Greek 



Lessons", . Jones. 

Grammar, „Harkncss. 

Lessons, — White. 

- Grammar, Goodwin. 

Mathematics, Algebra, Wentworth. 

English, Rhetoric and Composition. 

Bible, Daily Lessons. 

Natural Science, ...Physiology. 



Latin or Greek 



, Lessons,., Jones. 

) Grammar, Harkness. 

1 Lessons, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 

Mathematics Algebra Wentworth. 

Bible, Daily Lessons. 

Lnglish, .Rhetoric and Composition. 

Spelling once a week throughout the year. 



Biddle University. 13 



ELEMENTARY ENGLISH COURSE. 



ADMISSION. 



All applicants for admission to this Course must be at least twelve 
years of age ; must furnish satisfactory testimonials of good moral char- 
acter, and must be able to pass a satisfactory examination in the Fourth 
Reader, Primary Geography, and Arithmetic to Fractions. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Fifth Reader (Appletons'), Grammar, Graded Lessons fEeed & Kellogg), Arith' 
metic to Percentage, Geography completed (Maury's Manual,) with Map Drawing. 
Spelling, Penmanship, Bible. 

SECOND TERM. 

Fifth Reader (Appletons'), Grammar (Reed & Kellogg' s Higher Lessons), United 
Stated History (Barnes), Arithmetic to Ratio, Spelling, Penmanship, Bible. 



Exercises throughout both years in Composition and Declamation. Daily Les- 
sons in Bible and Shorter Catechism. 



MANUAL TRAINING 



Encouraged by substantial aid from the John F. Slater Fund, and 
the Board of Missions for Frreedmen, and benevolent individuals, 
this new Department was organized three years ago. Its object is to 
train students in various handicrafts, so that a greater variety of employ- 
ments may be open to them. Instruction has been given in Carpentry, 
and the use of tools, and in Mechanical Drawing. The worR of Print- 
ing has also been introduced, and this Catalogue is a specimen of the 
work that has been done. 



u 



BlDDLK UnTVEE 'TV. 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



MIDDLE. 

Judge O'Neal Knox, . 

Levi James Melton, 

John Alexander Ramseur, . 



Charlotte. 

Mechanicsville, B. C. 
Liucoliiton. 



JUNIOR. 

Daniel Decato Davis, 
John Mumford Caldwell, , 
Samuel Jackson Hargrave, 
Irwin Mathews Muldrow, . 
Albert Joseph Tate, 
Smith Gustavus Taylor, 



Laurens, 8. C. 
Lincoln, 111. 
Charlotte. 
Mayesville, 8. C. 
Mabanes. 
Oxford. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



SENIORS. 

James Monroe Boger, 
Pinkney Warren Russell, . 
Samuel Calvin Thompson, 
Robert Willy Williamson, . 



Concord. 
Newberry, S. C 
Winnsboro, S. C 
.Ringgold, Va. 



JUNIORS. 

William Alfred Byrd, 
John Chestnut Canty, . 
William Bretton Coles, . 
Neptune Newton Gregg, 
Edward Augustus Lawrence, . 
Henry Lafayette Peterson, . 
Henry Buist Rice, 

f Scientific. J Irregular. 



Winnsboro, S. C. 
Charlotte. 
Chester, S. C. 
Sumpter, S. C. 
Charlotte. 
Mayesville, S. C. 
Newberry, S. C. 



"BlDDLE "DNIVEHSITT. 



15 



Jacob Andrew Tillman, 
William Alexander Walker, 
Calvln Monroe Young, 

—10— 



Aiisonville. 
Chester, S. C. 
Due West & C. 



SOPHOMORES, 



"X David William Aiken, . 
Edward William Allen, 
David Soloman Collier, . 

X Julius Caesar Glark, 

Robert Langham Douglass, 
Henry Lawrence McCrorey 

f Hyder Morlin Stinson, 

X Tony Levi Toatley, . 
Josiah Perry Woolridge, 



-9— 



FRESHMEN. 



Thomas Henry Ayers, . 
George Elias C^sar, 
Stephen Carnelius Dobey, . 
William Patterson Donnell, 
Lawrence Brooks Ellerson, 
William Henry Haig, 
Jesse Howard Hutten, . 
Frank Orr Johnson, . 
William Means, 
William Henry Morrow, . 
WiHrrER Blake Middleton, . 
Joseph Andrew Rollins, . 
John Washington Roberts, . 
Julius John Robinson, 
Calvin Luke Sawyer, , 
Freeman Welch Thompson, 
Timothy Romeo Yeal, . 
Peter Washington Moone, . 

—18- 

f Scientific. 



Wimisboro, S. C 
Winnsboro, S. C, 
Abbeville, S. C. 
Statesville. 
Winnsboro, S. C. 
Winnsboro, S. G. 
Land's Ford, S. G 
White Oak, S. C. 
Bradley's, S. C. 



Winnsboro, S. C* 

Mayesville, S. C. 

Camden, S. C. 

Greensboro. 

Cheraw, & C. 

Charleston, S. G 

Newberry, S. C. 
, Charlotte. 
. Winnsboro, S. C. 

Greensboro. 

Charleston, S. C. 

Charleston, S. C. 

Sandifer. 

Greenville, S. C. 

Winnsboro, S. C. 

Doaksville, I. T. 

Winnsboro, S. C. 

Darroh, S. C. 



I Irregular. 



16 



Biddle University. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTM ENT. 



SENIORS. 

Agurs, John J 

Allison, Aesop Patrick, 
I Benjamin, Beauregard Baily . 

Bowman, Joseph Eugene 
J Ellerbe, John Alexander 
I Frazier, Simon Frank . 
X Graham, J. E 

Gregg, Junius .... 

Hood, Warren Deceal 

James, Anderson . 

Johnson, William Tower 

Jordan, John James . 
* McCain, Minor Ruthers 

McFadden, Clarence Sydney . 

McLamb. Samson Bryant 

McMillan, Shockley Clarence 

Muldrow, Hardy Harvey . 

Plair, Samuel Means 

Steele, James Monroe . 

Stitt, Joseph Wallace 

Shute, Charles Henry . 

Vaughan, John Maurice 

Woodward, E. O. . 

Woolridge, Calvin Foster 

—24— 



Chester, S. C. 
Laurens, S. C. 
Sardinia, S. C. 
Walterboro, S. C. 
Cheraw S. C. 
Mcintosh, No. 3, Ga. 
Concord. 
Sumpter, S. ('. 
Mt. Gallagher, S. C. 
Brown's Rock, S. C. 
Wilmington. 
Rock Hill, S. C, 
Monroe. 
Sardinia, S. C. 
Goldsboro. 
Lawrenburg. 
Mayesville, S, C. 
Winnsboro, S. C. 
Rock Hill, S. C. 
Matthews. 
Matthews. 

Nottoway C. H. Va. 
Asheville. 
Bradley's S. C. 



JUNIORS. 

Brown, A. L. 

Cardwell, Hunter Holmes . 
Clement, John Henry 
Dudley, George Physic . 
Duncan, Robert Craig 
Foster, Earnest Ebenezer 
X Hagler, Anthony Rufus 
Harris, Israel Ephraim . 
Jefferson, Alonzo Jonathan 
Johnson, Archie Pleasant 

* Suspended. J 



. Charlotte. 
Charlotte. 
Mocksville. 
Newburne. 
. Charlotte. 
Charlotte. 
. Charlotte. 
Charlotte. 
Mayesville, S. C. 
. Guthersville, S. C. 
Irregular. 



Biddle "University. 



IT 



Martin, Alexander L. 
Malloy, William Murphy 
Metz, William Lee 
Mitchel, Pascal Sherman . 
Montgomery, Abraham Lincoln 
Moses, John Quincy . . 
Pharr, Paul .... 
Pressley, William Monroe „ 

Bay, John 

Slade^ Walter . 
Stanback, James S. . . 
Stinson, William Henry . 
Thompson, Charles Christopher 
Tyler. John C. Singleton 
Wadsworth, Guy 
Watkins, Frederick Harrison 
Wyche, Samuel Judson 

_ 27— 
SECOND year. 
Barnes, Albert 
Boyd, Albert . . . 
boulware, belton klchard . 
Chalk, Theodore . ... 

Cansler, Henry 
Crawford, John Joseph 
Elrod, Thomas Monroe . 
Evans, Elisha Edward 
funderburk, brack baily . 
Flowers, William 
Grier Samuel James 
Henderson, James Monroe 
Hunter, James Henry . 
Johnson, Henry Stene 
Lightner, Joseph Anderson . 
Massey, John .... 
Maxwell, William 



Mechanicsville, S. C. 
Lawrenburg. 
Clinton, S. C. 
Mayesville, S. C 
Paw Creek. 
Mayesville, S. C. 
Charlotte. 
Anderson, S. G 
Clover, S. G 
Charlotte. 
Rockingham. 
Land's Ford, S. C. 
Lincolnton. 
Charlotte. 
Clinton, S. G 
Charlotte. 
Henderson. 



Charlotte. 

Rock Hill, S. G 

Ridgeway, S. G 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Smith Turn Out, S. G 

Piedmont, S. G 

Cheraw, S. G 

Cheraw, S. G 

Cairo. 

Winnsboro, S. G 

Winnsboro, S. G 

Charlotte. 

Newberne. 

Winnsboro, S. G 

Waxhaw. 

Charlotte. 



18 



Biddle University. 



Moody, William 
Pethel, James Alexander . 
Scott, Ormond Wendell . 
White, Isaac .... 
Harrison, John Pride 

—22— 

first year. 
Bell, John Calvin 
Alexander, Rufus Lafayette 
Cannon, James Monroe 
Chresfield, Timothy Andrew 
Conners, William Randall 
Craig, Thomas .... 
Davidson, Perry . 
Dawkins, James Walter . 
Dawkins, James Wesley 
Dawkins, Robert Samuel . 
Depp, Lewis Gozen 
Funderburk, Lewis Benjamin 
Jenkins, Robert Hannibal 
Johnson, Charles Monroe 
Holmes, James 
Howard, James 
Hudson, James Edkin 
Lashley, Milton Green 
Malloy, AViley Cornelius 
McBeth, John . 
Moore, Edward 
Moore, William 
Mowery, John Adon 
Morrison, James William . 
Ross, Willie Calvin 
Saville Isaac 
Smith, John Augustus 
Pharr, Moses Reid 
Walker, Thomas Montgomery 
Williams, George W. 

—30— 



Charlotte. 

Charlotte 
Wilmington. 

Fort Mills, 8. C. 
Rock Hill, S. C, 



Cowan's Ford. 

Huntersville. 

Concord. 

Monroe. 

Savannah, Ga. 

Waxhaw. 

Charlotte. 

Fish Dam, S. C. 

Fish Dam, S. C. 

Fish Dam, S. C. 

Mayfield, Kan. 

Monroe. 

Nottoway C. H, Va. 

Paw Creek. 

Charlotte. 

Waxhaw. 

Stout Station. 

Sanford. 

Tatum's, S. C. 

Charlotte. 

Pineville. 

Charlotte. 

Salisbury. 

Matthews. 

Belmont. 

Charlotte. 

Lauersburg. 

Charlotte. 

McCalls Dep., S. C. 

Mill Hill. 



Biddle University. 19 



Suwranrj* 



I. THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 
Middle Class, ...... 3 

Junior Class, ....... 6 

— 9 

II. COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 

Senior Class, ...... 4 

Junior Class, . . , , . . .10 
Sophomore Class, . . . . . .10 

Freshmen, . . . . .18 

— 42 

III. PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

Senior Year, ...... 25 

Junior Year, . . . . . . .28 

— 53 

ELEMEMTARY ENGLISH. 

Second Year, . . . . . . 22 

First Year, 30 

— 52 
Total in all Departments, — 156. 



20 Brr>DLE University. 



general i(uf;ormatirii. 



The new college building (see frontispiece), completed at a cast of 
$ 40,000, is 98x67 feet, three stories high, with chapel annexed 66x45 
feet. It is of orick, and contains twelve recitation rooms, each 34x24 
feet, two society halls, and an audience room capable of seating six hun- 
dred persons. 

The old college building has been refitted end enlarged, and is devo- 
ted to the purpose of the boarding department It Is now known as 
Logan Hall, it will be opened at the beginning of the Fall Term, and 
will close immediately after commencement. 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The School Year consists of one session of two terms, commencing on 
the first Wednesday of October, closing on the first Wednesday of June. 
Students wishing to enter should make early application. The best in- 
terests of the Ii stitution and of the student require that he report himself 
for duty promptly at the opening of each term. 

TUITION. 

There is no charge for tuition. 

BOARDING DEPARTMENT. 

A boarding house, modeled on the idea of a Christian home, has been 
established for the accommodation of students from abroad. Board in- 
cluding furnished rooms, light and fuel, is $8.00 per calendir month ; 
payable two months in advance. Boarders are not received for less than 
one month, and no deduction can be made for absence, unless ordered by 
the Faculty. 

RHETORICAL EXERCISES. 

All students meet by divisions on Friday afternoons for exercises in 
declamations and composition, under supervision of Professors. 

Two Literary SocieVes are in successful operation : The Mattoon and 
the Clariosophic. 



Biddle University. 21 



LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

Two large airy rooms on the first floor have been set apart as a Libra- 
ry and Reading Room. They will be open daily, and accessible to all. 
Here will be found a Library of about 3,600 volumes, and files of some 
of the leading newspapers and magazines. 

COLLEGE Y. M. C. A. 
A college branch of the Y. M. C. A. is in successful operation, with 
a membership of over 100. It is earnestly desired that all the students 
identify themselves with this noble work. 

PECUNIARY AID. 

Candidates for the ministry, and young men of promise, will receive 
such aid as their necessities and the resources at command will allow. 
Friends in Scotland have established a fund of over $ 6.000, the interest 
of which is to be used to aid young men preparing for mission work in 
Africa. 

LOCATION AND DESIGN IN THE ESTABLISHMENT 
OF THE INSTITUTION. 

The University is located at Charlotte, North Carolina, and is nam- 
ed in memory of the lateMaj. Henry J. Biddle, of Philadelphia, whose 
widow, Mrs. Mary D. Biddle, has been one of its most liberal support- 
ers. It is chartered by the Legislature of the State, and is under the 
auspices of the Presbyterian Board of Missions for Freedmen. 

The object of the institution is the education of colored teachers 
and preachers 

It stands at the terminus of six railroads, in the midst of a dense and 
comparatively intellig3-it colored popuUtion, and occupies a site of 50 
acres in the suburbs of the city. 

It is situated in the very heart of the Synod of Atlantic, which embra- 
ces the whole South Atlantic States, having 217 colored churches, 93 
ministers, 103 young men in preparation for the ministry, with a large 
number of schools and academies under its care. These schools and 
churches must be furnished with intelligent Christian teachers, who must 
be largely educated on the field and in cod tact with the people among 
whom they are to labor. Such a training is given here al less expense thai) 
it could be elsewhere : the student has the best opportunities for a liberal 



12 Bii)i>u: Dnivebsitt. 



education, together with the refining influence of a Christian home, and 

he is kept at the same time in contact and sympathy with the people. 

WANTS OF THE INSTITUTION. 

1st. In the language of the Secretary of the Freedmen's Board; 
"Permanent Endowment Funds for the adequate support of the "Pro 
ors, is an imperative necessity." $ 5,000 lms been secured for the Pres- 
ident's Chair. 

2d Scholarships ; the establishment of which shall yield $100 
each, per annum to enable needy and promising students in the higher 
departments to pursue their studies, continuously, through the college 
year; and in addition to this a few hundred dollars to be placed in the 
hands of the Faculty, to be used at its discretion, in aiding needy and 
worthy students, is a great desideratum. 

3d. Donations of clothing, for distribution among needy students, are 
earnestly solicited. 

4th. Useful books for the library are much needed, works of refer- 
ence, biography, history and science. A Library fund is much needed, 
that there may be purchases from time to time of new and valuable 
books. 

CONCLUSION. 

No Institution in the care of the Presbyterian Church has a wider 
£ eld or greater opportunities. Its students are gathered from all the 
South Atlantic States, and are scattered in their school and church work 
through all this vast region, and as far west as Texas. 

The Institution is consecrated to the glory of God and the welfare of 
a needy race. It is the only Institution of its kind maintained by our 
Presbyterian church in the South ; and it certainly is one of the most im- 
portant agencies in the hands of the church for the accomplishment of 
good among our seven millions of Freedmen. It commends itself to the 
prayers and gifts of all good men. 

The importance, in the eyes of the church, of the interests which Bid- 
die University represents, is forcibly put in the language of a recent cir- 
cular addressed to the churches on its behalf by the Board of Missions 
fir Freedmen. 



Biddle University. 23 



"What is done," say they, '-for Eiddle University, will, in a great 
measure, determine the success of our whole work among the Freedmen. 
It furnishes our only hope of educating native teachers and preachers on 
the field. Indifference to Biddle University is indifference to our whole 
work among the Freedmen. If liberally supported, no missionary un- 
dertaking will return speedier and more abundant fruit. Where are the 
men and women who w T ill build up this Institution for the glory of God 
and the good of a needy race? " 

In proof of the estimation in which it is held by prominent Southern 
men, see the following extract from a letter of Hon. Z. B. Vance, Uni- 
ted States Senator from North Carolina : 

u * * * I am well acquainted with Biddle University, find I think it letter 
j, circumstanced to do good rliau any other Institution of the kind in the South, 
,, The whole people of the region are fully in accord witli its object" 

From Rev. Drury Lacy, D. D., late President of Davidson College, 
N. C: 

" I firmly beleive that Biddle University is doing a greater work for Missions, 
"foreign and domestic, than any mission at home or abroad,, 

From Dr. E. Nye Hutchinson: 

" It is my earnest prayer that some liberal Presbyterian may fully endow Biddle 
"University, and make it not only useful to its generation at home, but a blessing 
"to the world." 

Contributions to any of the objects above named may be sent to the 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees, 

Rev. W. F. Johnson, D. D., President, 

Or to Rev. J. T. Gibson, Pittsburg, Pa,, Treasurer of the Presbyterian 
Board of Missions for Freedmen. 



Names omitted. 
Calvin Elias Radford, Senior Preparatory, Doakesville, I. T. 
f Mitchel H. Thompson, Sophomore, Columbia, S. C. 
% T. H. Frierson. Junior Preparatory, Sumpter, S. C. 



24 Biddle University. 



I|nitret5it0 $|demlat\ 



1890. 

Sunday, June 1, 3 p. m., Baccalaureate Sermon. 
Monday, June 2, 8 p. m., Junior Exhibition. 
Tuesday, June 3, 8 p. m., Address before Alumni Association, by 
Rev. I. D. Davis, Class of '81. 

Wednesday, June 4, 10 A. m., Commencement Exercises. 

Tuesday, September 30, p. m., Examination of Applicants for Admission. 

Wednesday, October 1, Fall Term begins. 

Wednesday, December 24, Christmas vacation. 

1891. 

Wednesday, January 28, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
February 2, Second Term begins. 
Friday, March 27, 7:30 p. m., Joint Exhibition of the Literary Soci- 
eties. 

Wednesday, June 3, Commencement Exercises. 







\S 



-^ ^ ^ 4?-- -2^^— ■£?—£: ^--^ ^ 1 -ZzrSi ifc— £s— -.2-- 



■r - ■^ --^-i g -^-V- y -y-V-y-T-y^^-¥ -y— y-y -y- - y — y - y ' y ^ y -- y - y- ▼ ▼ - - y- 



CATALOGUE 



OK 



THE LIBRARY 
Of THt 

wmmirr tf ftuwMS 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY, 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



1892-93. 



-- - v- — -w — 4r=-^*» — ^- - ■r .- -W--- 'r '-▼- . ^; - .^_-^,--- t —- y---y- ▼ — y - -y ~ -y -- -y— ^y—~ * » .- -▼ - ▼ -- y- t r -y ' --y-^-y-- 



> ■ 







■a— 






SlU 




.(§NI 






TWENTY^FOURTH 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



Biddle University, 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



1893^93. 



Under the Cake of the Board of Missions for Freedmen of the 
Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A., Pittsburg, Pa. 



•<^f 



m 



^1 






J^0(ap0 ©J puslees. 



Class whose term will expire June ist, 1893, 

REV. G. C. CAMPBELL, Burkville, Va, 
REV. DAVID BROWN. Statesville, N. C. 
REV. R. P. WYCHE, Charlotte, N. C. 
REV. W. R. COLES, Aiken S. C. 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1894. 

REV. A. S. BILLINGSLEY, Statesville, N. C. 
REV. S. LOOMIS, A. M., Chester, S. C. 
REV. H. N. PAYNE, D D., Atlanta, Ga. 
REV. C S. WEST, Sumter, S. C. 
HON. W. B. NEGLEY, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1895. 

REV. D. S. BAKER, Lincolnton, N. C. 
REV. J. P. E. KUMLER, D D.. Pittsburg. Pa. 
MR. ROBERT S. DAVIS, Pittsburg, Pa. 
J. C. McCOMBS, Esq., Pittsburg, Pa. 
PROF. H. A. GREEN, Chester, S. C. 



icer>s. 



REV. A. S. BILLINGSLEY, President. 
REV. D. J. SANDERS, D D., Treasurer. 
REV. R. P. WYCHE. Secretary. 



Koculty 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 

President, and Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History and Church 
Government. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D., Ph. D., 

Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis. 

Rev. H. C. Mabry, D. D., 

Professor of Systematic Theology and Homiletics. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Christian Evidence. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, A. B., 

Professor of Greek. 

Prof. Geo. E. Davis, A. M., 

Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. B., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. W. F. Brooks, D. D., 

Professor and Principal of Preparatory Department. 

J. D. Martin, A. B. 

Assistant Professor. 

H. A. Hunt, A. B., 

Superintendent of the Industrial Department. 

Rev. Geo. Carson, 

Superintendent of Home, and College Pastor. 

A. U. Frierson, 

Librarian. 

Geo. E. Davis, 

Secretary of Faculty. 






^rr)<z0J0<2[ice[l Wepopfrrjer)!, 



FACULTY. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 

President, and Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History and 

Church Government. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D D., Ph D., 
Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis. 

Rev H, C Mabry, D. D., 
Professor of Systematic Theology and Homileiics. 

Rev, W. M. Hargrave, D. D , 
Professor of Christian Evidences and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. A U. Frierson, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of Greek Exegesis. 



ADMISSION. 



This Department is open to young men of all denominations. 
Candidates for admission must produce evidence that they are 
members in good and regular standing in some evangelical Church; 
that they possess competent talent; and that they have been regu- 
larly graduated at some College or University, or in some way they 
have received an equivalent for the training of a College course. 
Applicants for admission to an advanced standing must present 
a dismission from some other Theological Seminary, or be pre- 
pared for examination on the subjects which have been pursued by 
the class which they desire to enter. 

In exceptional cases, promising young men who have not had 
the benefit of a full college course will be received, and will be al- 
lowed to pursue an electic course. 

The practical work of the Ministry is joined with study, as the 
theological students have opportunities of laboring as catechists 
in the neighboring churches during vacation and term time. 

The regular course of study covers three full years. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



Junior Year. 

Hebrew — Grammar, and Manual Harper. 

Theology Hodge's Outlines. 

Greek Exegesis . The Gospels 

Biblical History 

Church Government 

Biblical Introduction 



Middle Year. 

Hebrew — Historical Books Harper. 

Theology Hodge's Outlines. 

Greek Exegesis Pauline Epistles. 

Church History 

Homiletics Broadus, 

Church Government 

Biblical Introduction 



Senior Year. 

Hebrew , Prophecy and Poetry 

Theology 

Pastoral Theology 

Greek Exegesis Pauline Epistles. 

Church Government 

Biblical Introduction 

Weekly exercises in Sermonizing are begun in the Junior Year, 
and continued throughout the course. 



6 i'.IDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

OLD TESTAMENT.- -Professor Bissell. 

1. During 1892 3, and every second year, a course upon Old 
Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice a week tor 
half the year. 

2. Junior Class. Hebrew begun. Recitations five times a 
week throughout the year. Textbooks: Harper's Elements ol He- 
brew, Harper's Introductory Hebrew Method and Manual. Special 
emphasis is laid upon the acquisition of a vocabulary. The inflec- 
tions of the language and several hundred of the commonest words 
are memorized There is daily drill in reciprocal oral translation 
and in writing Hebrew. 

3. Middle Class. Reading from the Historical Books twice a 
week throughout the year. Text books: Hebrew Bible, Harper's 
Hebrew Syntax Driver's Hebrew Tenses. Special attention will 
be given to the Syntax, to enlarging the vocabulary and to rapid 
reading. For a part of the year, the class will take English Bibles 
to the blackboards and, with these alone, write the Hebrew from 
memory. 

4. Senior Class. Reading at sight from the Historical Books. 
Exegesis of Hebrew Prophecy and poetry, twice a week through- 
out the year. 

5. During 1893-4, an d every second year, such members of 
the Middle and Senior classes are as qualified for it, may make a 
beginning in Comparative Semitic Grammar by reading compara- 
tively the first chapters of Genesis in Hebrew, Aramaic, Synac 
and Arabic. 

NEW TESTAMENT.-Professor Bissell, 

i. During 1893 4, an d every second year, a course upon New 
Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice a week for 
half the year. 

2. a. Junior Class will read the remaining three Gospels with 
reference to the Harmony, and, also, to the distinctive character of 
each of the four Gospels, four times a week throughout the year. 

b. Middle Class will read Ephesians with exeeesis, twice a week 
through the year. The other Epistles of the captivity. Philippians, 
Colossians, and Philemon, will be assigned for private reading. 
A summary of their contents will be consided in the class-room, 
and they will be required in the examination. 

c. Senior Class will read Romans with exegesis, twice a week, 
through the year. The other Epistles of the third Missionary 
Journey, I Corinthians, II Corinthians, and Galatians will be 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 7 

assigned for private reading. Their scope and contents will be 
discussed in the school-room, and they will be required in exam- 
ination. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY.-Dr. Mabry. 

In this Department the purpose is to have each student to read 
during his course, some standard work on Systematic Theology, 
and in addition to this, to read some authority on Theism. 

The Junior Class will read the course in outline. The Middle 
Class will take up Christian Theism. Inspiration and Anthropology; 
and the Senior Class, Soteriology and Eschatology, 

This course of reading will be made the subject of the most 
thorough examination and free discussion, and will be supplemented 
by every available means which are likely to encurage and stimu- 
late the student in his search for truth, and in preparaiions for its 
defence. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Homiletics — The work of this Department is carried on 
throughout the Seminary Course In the Junior and Middle years, 
a text-book on the "Preparation and Delivery of Sermons," is read 
This is supplemented by exercises in the analysis of Sermons and 
extempore preaching, before the students of the Theological 
Department. 

In the Middle and Senior Classes much attention is given to the 
preparation and criticism of Sermon plans and extempore preaching. 

Christian Evidences. — Dr. Hargrave. — By means ot Text- 
books and discussions the student is aided in verifying the Biblical 
prools of doctrine and Christian truth as represented in the symbols 
of the church, and he is thus trained to express with facility and 
clearness the revealed will of God. 

Pastoral Theology — The treatment of this subject is confined 
to the third year of the course. It is designed that each student 
shall become thoroughly acquainted with the best method of 
applying the mesage of salvation to the hearts and lives of men. 
Lectures are given, accompanied by use of text- book. 

The course includes the importance of ministerial piety, proper 
habits of study, skill and ability in the various branches of church 
work, the pastor's relation and duty to the various courts of the 
church, and the various private and public duties pertaining to his 
office. 



8 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

The Sacraments. — During the middle year the Sacraments 
receive special attention. 

Church Government — Dr. Sanders. — Four lectures on the 
general subject are given to the Junior Class. 

In the Middle year, the Form of Government with proof texts, 
is taken up and pursued through one term, and a minute com- 
parison with other forms of church polity is made 

In the Senior year, Dr. Hodge's work. "What is Presbyterian 
Law?" and the Book of Discipline are used as textbooks, accom- 
panied by lectures. 

BIBLICAL AND ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY--Dr Sanders. 

Since Sacred History is of vital importance as a part of a thor- 
ough Theological Education, the subject is pursued through the 
entire three years' course. 

Biblical History is studied by the Junior Class with the English 
version of the Old Testament as a text book, and Smith's Old 
Testament History as a guide, and is taught by lectures and con- 
stant reference to the typical and preparatory nature of the Old 
Testament. The connection between sacred and profane History 
is pointed out and attention is given to Archaeology, Geography, 
and Chronology. 

Ecclesiastical History. — This subject is taken up by the Middle 
class and is taught by lectures and with text book, covering the 
period from Apostolic times to the Reformation — 16th Century. 

The Senior Class continues the subject from the Reformation 
to the present time, devoting the second term to the history of the 
Presbyterian church in the United Spates. 

During each year a carefully prepared thesis, having for its 
subject some leading personage, epoch, or phase, etc, of sacred 
history, is required from each student. 



BTDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



. vfj0lle(2re, J@)epe[Ffn)fcr)l 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 
President and Professor of History. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, A. B., 
Professor of Greek. 

Rev. H. C. Mabry, D. D., 
Professor of English Literature. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science, and the Evidence 

of Christianity. 

Prof. Geo. E. Davis, A. M,, 
Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. B., 
Professor of Mathematics, and Assistant in Latin. 



The College Department embraces two courses of study, the 
Classical and the Scientific. Students completing the Classical 
Course satisfactorily receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts; those 
completing the Scientific Course, that of Bachelor of Science. 
Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are examined in 
the studies prescribed in our Preparatory Course, or their equiva- 
lent, in case of those coming from other schools. 

For advanced standing the candidate, in addition to the pre- 
paratory studies will be examined in those previously studied by 
the class he wishes to enter, or others equivalent to them. 



IO BltfDLE UNIVERSITY. 



CLASSICAL COURSK. 



FRESHMEN YEAR. 

Latin . , VirgiJ, Greenough. 

Grammar, Allen and Greenough. 

Greek. Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, III, IV, 

Grammar, Goodwin. 

Mathematics .... Geometry, Wentworth. 
History Myers. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Term. 

Latin .... .... Horace, Satires and Epistles. 

Greek . . Homer, Iliad, Books I, II, III. 

Mathematics Geometry. Wentwonh. 

Natural Science . . Physics, Gage. 

Second Term. 

Latin Tacitus's Germania, *nd Agricola. 

Greek Xenophon's Memorabilia. 

Mathematics Geometry Wentworth. 

Natural Science . . Botany, Wood's. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Term. 

Natural Science . . Physical Geopraphy, Mauray's. 
. . Astronomy, Young. 

Greek Plato, Apology and Crit/\ 

Mathematics .... Plane, and Spherical Trigonometry 
Rhetoric Genung. 

Second Term. 

Greek . New Testament, one of the Gospels. 

• • Euripides, Ephigenia Among the Taurians, 

Mathematics .... Surveying. 
Natural Science . . Astronomy, Young. 

Rhetoric Genung. 

Rudiment. Psycol. . . Steele. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. II 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term. 

Mental Philosophy . Haven, with Lectures. 

English Literature 

Logic McCosh. 

Evidences of Christianity ...... Barrows. 

Greek Testament 

Chfmistry Williams. 

Political Economy Laughlin. 

Second Term. 

Mental Philosophy Haven, with Lectures. 

Zoology Steele. 

Science and Religion Frazer. 

Civil Government . . Thorpe. 

Moral Philosophy Calderwood. 

Greek Testament 

One recitation each week in the Bible. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



FRESHMEN YEAR. 

Mathematics Algebra and Geometry, Wentworth. 

History . Myers. 

Bible Once a week. 

Latin or Greek 

sophomore year. 

First Term. 

Mathematics Geometry, Wentworth. 

Natural Science Physics, Gage. 

Physical Geography, Apptaton. 

German and Latin or Greek 

Second Term. 

Mathematics Geometry, Wentworth. 

Natural Science Botany, Wood 

German, and Latin or Greek. 



12 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Term. 

Mathematics Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Natural Science Chemisiry, Williams. 

English Literature 

Political Science Political Economy, Laughlin. 

German 

Second Term. 

Mathematics Astronomy and Surveying 

Natural Science Zoology, Steele. 

Political Science Civil Government, Young. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. 

Mental Philosophy Haven, with Lectures. 

Rhetoric Genung. 

Logic McCosh. 

Sacred History 

Second Term. 

Evidences of Christianity . Barrow's Companion to the Bible. 

Moral Philosophy Calderwood. 

Science and Religion Fraser. 

Sacred History 

Throughout the College Course there is a weekly recitation in 
the Bible either in English or Greek; also, throughout the course, 
exercises in English Composition and declamation. 



NATURAL SCIENCE.-Prof. Davis. 

Outline, 

Physics — Five months 4 times a week. 

Botany — Three months . 

Physical Geography — Four months 

Astronomy — Four months 

Chemistry— Five months 

Zooltgy — Three months 



RIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 1 3 



1. Physics. 



During the Sophomore year, the following topic, with others, 
will be treated: Mathematical Physics, Molecular Physics, Hydros- 
tatics, Pneumatics, the Kinetic Theory of Gases, Acoustics; Elec- 
tricity and Magnetism, the Correllation and Conservation of 
Energy. 

Gage's Elements of Physics is used. 

2. Chemistry. 

Chemistry will be studied during the first five months of the 
Senior year. The work embraces the general treatment of Chemi- 
cal Philosophy, Chemistry of the non-metals, the metals, organic 
Chemistry, and Chemical Archnology. 

The lectures on this subject will be illustrated by experiments 
and be followed by reviews and examinations during the course. 
Apparatus and reagents sufficient for laboratory works will be furn- 
ished the student at a small cost. 

Williams's Introduction to Chemical Science will be used in 
connection with lectures. 

3. Astronomy. 

The second half of the Junior year is devoted to the study of 
Astronomy; embracing the elementary principles of mathematical 
and physical Astronomy, such as Parallax Refraction, Latitude and 
Longitude, Precession, Nutation, Abberration. Theory of tides and 
lunar eclipses, and elements of a planet's orbit. 

Young's Elements of Astronomy is used. 

4. Botany. 

The subject of Botany is pursued during the last three months 
of the Sophomore year. The student is required to gather speci- 
mens of flowers and plants ; to analyze and classify the same. An 
herbarium of thirty specimens is required. 

Wood's New Botanist and Florist is used. 

5. Zoology. 

The last three months of the Senior Year will be devoted to 
Zoology. Typical forms will be used to illustrate the subject as 
they may be obtained in the locality. 

Steel's Fourteen Weeks in Zoology is used as a text- book. 



14 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

6. Physical Geography. 

This subject covers the first half of the Junior year. It will 
be treated mainly by lectures Mauray's Geography will be used as 
a text book; but the student will have daily access to such books as 
Mauray's Geography of the Sea, Foye's Child and Nature, Guyot's 
Earth and Man, Goldthwaite's Geographical Magazine, Ritter's 
Comparative Geography, and similar Books for collateral reading. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. --Prof. Davis. 

Harkness's Latin Grammar will be the standard of reference 
throughout the course. 

Freshman year : First and Second Terms — Virgil's yEneid. 
first four Books. Second term, Juvenal's Satires. 

Sophomore Year : First and Second Term — Satires and Epis- 
tles of Horace. Special attention will be given to scanning the 
metres of Horace. Lectures on Roman life, art and customs will 
occupy part of the last term. 

GREEK. --Prof. Frierson. 

The course of study as outlined is intended or designed to 
lay for the ordinary student a loundation for the successful prose- 
cution of the Greek language and literature. 

The Junior Class will read from the New Testament, one of the 
Gospels. Recitation daily till completed. 

The Senior Class will read " The Acts of the Apostles" with 
attention to the growth of the Apostolic Church. Recitation twice 
per week throughout the school year. 

Examination required of each class. 

MODERN LANGUAGE-GERMAN. -Prof. Bissell. 
The study of modern languages has been introduced, but for 
the coming year only the German language will be taught, in the 
Scientific course, the Sophomore class, and afterward it can be 
pursued by both Sophomores and Juniors 

MATHEMATICS.-Prof. Pride. 

The required course in Mathematics comprises Plane and Solid 
Geometry, Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Plane Geo7netry. — The Freshmen begin with Plane Geometry 
(Wentworth's), in the study of which special attention is given to 
the exercises for original demonstration and, that a love for and 
interest in the science may be developed, a free discussion of the 
possibilities of each proposition is encouraged. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. I 5 

Solid and Spherical Geometry — This is the prescribed course 
for Sophomores and, in order that the students may have a proper 
notion of solid figures as graphically represented on plane surfaces, 
they are encouraged to make their own models for illustration. 
This is facilitated by the co-operation of the Industrial Depart- 
ment. 

Trigonometry and Surveying. — The course for Juniors includes 
Trigonometry and Surveying with practical use of instruments: 
Special attention devoted to field work. 

HISTORY--Dr. Sanders. 

The study of General History is carried through the Freshmen 
year, with text-book and by lectures. On this subject there will be 
four recitations a week. 

PHILOSPHY--Dr. Hargrave. 

Psychology. — Rudimentarv Psychology is taught during the 
first and second terms of the Junior vear. 

Mental Scie?ice. — Mental Science is taught through the Senior 
year by the use of text books and lectures 

Moral Science. — Moral Science is studied through the second 
term of the Senior Year, and the students are instructed in the 
principles of Theoretical and Practical Eihics. 

Rational Philosophy, or Formal and Particular Logic — Logic 
is studied so as to make the student familiar with Logical Termi- 
nology and forms, and with the Laws of Discursive Thought 

Civil Government — Civil Government and the Consti'ution of 
the United States, and Political Economy, are studied in the Senior 
year, and each student is made acquainted with the government of 
the people of the United States and American citizenship. 

Evidences of Christianity, Science and Religion, and Theism — 
Instruction in these subjects is given by means of text-books and 
class room discussions during the second term of the Senior year. 



1 6 RIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



{©py erncl Iy< 



pep® priory 0r)d lyoprrjtzr 
Uepe[pfrr)e,r)f. 



FACULTY. 

Rev- D. J, Sanders, D. D., 
President. 

Rev. Wm. F. Brooks, D D , 
Principal and Professor of English 

Jas. D. Martin, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of Latin and English, 

P. W. Russell, A. B , 

Phillip Drayton, 

Assistant Intructors in English. 



The Preparatory Department aims to prepare the student 
thoroughly for the studies of either course of the College Department. 
For the present, the elementary English course is a necessity, as 
the large majority of the students coming to the Institution have not 
had the opportunity to ground themselves in the common English 
branches. Upon completing the studies of this course, the student 
is prepared to teach in the common schools of the State, as well as 
to enter the Freshman Class. A certificate will be given to each 
student completing this course. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. I 7 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Latin Easy Latin Method, Harkness. 

English Lessons in Language, Tarbell. 

Mathematics . Arithmetic and Algebra, Wentworth, Greenleaf. 

Bible . , Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Spelling, once a week throughout the year. 

SENIOR YEAR, 

First Term. 

Latin Caesar. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 
Greek Beginner's Greek, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin, 

Mathematics Algebra, Wentworth. 

Physiology Lincoln. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Second Term, 

Latin Caesar. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 
Greek Beginner's Greek, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 

Mathematics Algebra, Wentworth. 

English Lessons in English, Lockwood. 

Book Keeping Scribner. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Spelling, once a week throughout the year. 

Drawing will be given a place in the course during the present year. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



JUNIORS. 

English Lessons in Language, Tarbell. 

Mathematics . . Arithmetic & Algebra, Wentworth, Greenleaf. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Penmanship and Spelling once a week throughout the year. 



1 8 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

SENIORS. 

Latin or Greek Easy Latin Method, Harkness. 

Beginner's Greek, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 

Mathematics Algebra Wentworth. 

English Rhetoric and Composition, Tarbell. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Natural Science . . . . Physiology, L ; ncoln. 

Spelling . once a week throughout the year. 



ELEMENTARY ENGLISH COURSE. 



ADMISSION. 

All applicants for admission to this course must be at least 
twelve years of age, must furnish satisfactory testimonials of good 
moral character, and must be able to pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion in the Fourth Reader, Primary Geography, and Arithmetic to 
Fractions. 

first year. 

Reader (Eggleston's U. S. History), Grammar, Graded Les- 
sons (Reed and Kellogg' s), Arithmetic to Percentage, Geography 
completed (Mauray's Manual), with Map Drawing, Spelling, 
Penmanship, Bible (Harper's Small History). 

second year. 

Swinton's Fifth Reader, Grammar (Reed and Kellogg' s 
Higher Lessons), United States History (Montgomery's), Arith- 
metic to Mensuration, Spelling, Penmanship, Bible (Harper's 
Small History). 

Exercises throughout both years in composition and declama- 
tion. Weekly lessons in the Bible and the Shorter Catechism. 



RIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



19 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

, Seniors. 

Pinkney Warren Russell, A B Newberry, S. C. 

Samuel Calvin Thompson, A. B Winnsboro, S. C. 

Middlers. 

Neptune Newton Gregg, A. B Sumter, S. C. 

Henry Lafeytte Peterson, A. B Mayesville, S. C. 

Samuel Robinson Chester, S. C. 

Jacob Andrew Tillman, A. B ..... . Ansonville. 

Calvin Monroe Young, A. B Due West, S. C. 

— 5— 

Juniors. 

Edward William Allen, A. B Winnsboro, S. C. 

Henry Lawrence McCrory, A. B Winnsboro, S. C. 

James M. McKay Ridgway, S. C, 

Wm. Sanders Biddleville. 

Hyder Morlin Stinson, A. B Land's Ford, S. C. 

— 5— 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 

Seniors. 

Thomas Henry Ayers Winnsboro. S. C. 

George Elias Caesar Mayesville, S. C. 

James Henry Cooper Manning, S. C. 

William Patterson Donnell Greensboro. 

Philip Drayton Rock Hill, S. C. 

Lawrence Brooks Ellerson Cheraw, S. C, 

Jesse Howard Hutten Newberry, S. C. 

William Henry Morrow Greensboro. 

Walter Blake Middleton Charleston, S. C. 

Julius John Robinson Greenville, S. C. 

Timothy Romeo Veal Winnsboro, S. C. 

— u — 



20 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Juniors. 

^Esop Patrick Allison Laurens, S. C. 

Joseph Eugene Bowman Walterboro, S. C. 

Junius Gregg Sumter, S. C. 

William Henry Haig Charleston, S. C. 

Warren Deceal Hood Mt. Gallagher, S. C. 

Anderson James Brown's Rock, S. C. 

Hardy Harvey Muldrow Mayesville, S. C. 

Samuel Means Plair Winnsboro, S. C. 

Joseph Andrew Rollins Charleston, S. C. 

Calvin Luke Sawyer Winnsboro, S. C. 

Charles Henry Shute Matthews^ 

John Maurice Vaughan Nottaway C. H., Va. 

— 12 — 

Sophomores. 

John Henry Clement Mocksville. 

John Emmanuel Harris Huntersville. 

John Pride Harrison Rock Hill, S. C. 

Alonzo Jonathan Jefferson Mayesville, S. C. 

Archie Pleasant Johnson Guthriersville. S. C. 

Alexander L. Martin Mechanicsville, S. C. 

Samson Bryant McLamb Goldsboro. 

William Lee Metz Clinton, S. C. 

William Monroe Pressley Anderson, S. C. 

Calvin Elias Radford Doaksville, I. T. 

Dallas Edward Speed Henderson. 

William Henry Stinson Land's Ford, S. C. 

Joseph Wallace Stitt Matthews. 

John Singleton Tyler Charlotte. 

Guy Wadsworth Clinton, S. C. 

Frederick Henry Watkins Erie Mills. 

— 16— 

Freshmen. 

Robert James Boul^are Flint Hill, S. C. 

H. H. Cardwell Charlotte. 

William Henry Carroll Waukulla. 

Thomas Monroe Elrod Piedmont, S. C. 

William M. Flowers Cairo. 

Earnest Ebenezer Foster Charlotte. 

Brack Bailey Funderburk Cheraw, S. C. 



RIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 21 

Samuel James Grier Winnsboro, S. C. 

James Monroe Henderson Winnsboro, S. C. 

James Alexander Pethel Charlotte. 

Armand Wendell Scott Wilmington. 

John H. Sampson Pikeville. 

Jesse Waldo Westbrook Chester, S. C. 

— J 3— 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Seniors. 

Rufus Lafayette Alexander Huntersville. 

Floyd Joseph Anderson Jetersville, Va. 

Howard Warren Bates Cheraw, S. C. 

William Randall Conners Savannah, Ga. 

Earnest Linwood Covington Laurinburg. 

Charles Washington Ellis Due West, S. C, 

* Douglass Fair Chester, S. C. 

Ludie Fielder Wellford, S. C. 

Ernest Ebenezer Foster Biddleville. 

John Jackson Frazier Tradesville. S. C. 

Emanuel Joel George Orton 

Edward Warren Gregg Sumter, S. C. 

Miles Junius Jackson Mayesville, S. C, 

Moses Henderson Lewis Greenleaf. 

George Alexander Morrow Greensboro. 

Warren Walter Muldrow Mayesville, S. C. 

Samuel Reid Pharr Biddleville. 

James Eugene Powe Cheraw, S. C. 

Wm. Eugene Price Wilmington. 

Fred. C. Sadgwar, Jr Wilmington. 

Charles Edward Saxon ........ Greenville, S. C. 

Walter Thomas Singleton Cheraw, S. C. 

John Edgar Smith ........... Charlotte. 

William Haynesworth Spann , Sumter, S. C. 

Isaac D. L. Torrence Huntersville. 

Samuel Liddell Young Greenville, S. C. 

—26— 



* Deceased. 



2 2 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Juniors. 

Zechariah Alexander Charlotte. 

James Richard Alsobrooks Polkton. 

F. M. Boulware Flint Hill. S. C. 

E. C. Byers Davidson. 

Henry James Cantey Charlotte. 

L. B. Cooper Sardinia, S. C. 

S L. Costner Sago. 

Thomas Craig Waxhaw. 

Thomas Henry Davis Mayesville, S. C. 

Zander Adam Dockery Mangum. 

J. E. Tice Perryville, Ky. 

Taylor Girardeau Frierson Sumter, S. C. 

Edward Earnest Hagler Charlotte. 

Bradley Samuel Harris Mayesville, S. C. 

Hugh Harry Winsboro, S C. 

* Joseph J. Hayswood Louisburg. 

Robert B. Henderson Huntersville. 

E. J. Holland . Madison, Ga. 

J. W. Hollins Bookman, S. C. 

Robert Anderson Hudson Stout. 

W L. Hudson Stout. 

T. G. Jenkins Enterprise, S. C. 

John Moses Johnson Blackstocks, S. C- 

L. W. Johnson Winnsboro, S C. 

E. M. Mann Henderson. 

Isaac M Martin Mechanicsville, S 

John Lee Massey Waxhaw. 

Walter Lewis McNair Laurinburg. 

John Calvin McNeill Red Springs. 

G. M. Mitchell Mayesville, S. C. 

Samuel Isaac Moone Darroh, S. C. 

W. B Moone Darroh, S. C. 

J. W. Morrison Matthews. 

J. L. Morton Hamburg, S. C. 

Wm. Randolph Muldrow Mayesville. 

Thomas W. Nance Yorkville, S. C. 

William Arthur Pethel Charlotte. 

Isaac Henry Russell Mint Hill. 



• Deceased. 



2 3 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



John Eli Walker Charlotte. 

Beverly Major Ward Jennings Ordinary, Va. 

John Henry Warren Concord. 

F. Watson Nottoway C H., Va. 

D. F. White Richmond, Ky. 

Richard Edward Williams Goldsboro. 

A. B, Wingo . Amelia C. H., Va. 

James Wells Ycung . Shelby. 

-46- 

Second Year English. 

C. E. Alexander Lodo. 

C. M. Anderson . . Amelia C. H. , Va. 

C. B. Bailey Clinton, S. C. 

J. H. Byers Greensboro. 

A. G. Carter Concord. 

T. A. Chrestfield Monroe. 

J. W. Coleman Charlotte. 

J. W. Cooper Charlotte. 

William Cureton Union Co. 

Charles Henry Dunn Matthews. 

Z. W. Foster . . . Biddleville. 

Alexander Gaston Savannah, Ga. 

J. W. Grier Steele Creek. 

J. W, Gross Derita. 

J. Howard Waxhaw. 

W. B. Hudson .... Stout. 

W. A. Jenkins Steele Creek. 

A. B. Johnson Guthresville, S. C. 

R. P. Johnson Jetersville, Va. 

J. H W. Kelley Louisburg. 

Edgar Leighton Timmonsville. S. C. 

A. North . Charlotte. 

J. E. Mebanes Durham. 

J. D. McMillan - Red Springs. 

J. H. Miller Grahamville. S. C. 

George Mills , Laurens, S. C. 

H. M. Mobley Lancaster Co., S C. 

W. M. Peoples Matthews. 

W. B. Perry Fayetteville. 

W. Pettey Sanderfer. 

W. Russell Winnsboro, S. C. 



24 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

T. A. Sanders Spartanburg, S. C. 

J. A. Saville Nimrod. 

J. J. Sharp Monrovia, Liberia Africa. 

J. J. Shepperson Smithville, Va. 

S. D Shepperson .... Smithville, Va. 

C. W. Simms .... Carlisle S. C. 

E. Simms Winnsboro, S. C. 

G. R. Spaulding Rosendale. 

L. Spaulding Rosendale. 

R. Tyler Biddleville. 

A. J. Tyson Charlotte. 

O. F. Vick Wilson. 

William Ward Adam's Run, S. C. 

G. F. Wilson Mayesville, S. C 

A. R. Wingo Amelia C. H , Va. 

W. H. Wright Amelia C. H., Va. 

-46- 

First Year. 

Wm. Alexander Sago. 

W. H. Ancrum Cash's Depot. 

R. S. Adams Lexington. 

Warren H. Arch Ouogue, L. I. 

James Baggett Lumberton. 

E. B. Brooks Biddle University. 

J. A. Brown Charlotte. 

A. Bost Concord. 

W. B. Catus Mt. Airy. 

Edward Crawford Guthriesville, S. C. 

W, Cureton Cureton Store, S. C. 

P. J. Davidson Sago. 

W. Davidson Charlotte. 

C. Davis Walkup. 

W. Dubose • Charlotte. 

C. F. Flow Pioneer Mills. 

Jos. Ganges West Chester, Pa. 

A. Hargrave Salem. 

G. Hardy Dallas. 

Mack Hardv Spartanburg, S. C. 

C. S. Hawkins Warrenton. 

W. G Hood Walkup. 

J. W. Houston Gastonia. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 25 

J. L. Hughes Mebanes. 

O. J. Jackson , Charlotte. 

W. A. Jenkins Steel Creek. 

J. F. King Crewe, Va. 

W. D. Malloy Tatum Sta., S. C 

R. J. McClain \ . Sago. 

C. R. McClure . Biddleville. 

J. M. McLean Steel Creek. 

G. L. McLean Bunn's Level. 

Jno. McRae McCall, S. C. 

D. D. McRay Cheraw, S. C. 

J. H. Moore Charlotte. 

E. W. Murray Rembert, S. C. 

J. A Patterson Matthews. 

K. E. Prather Booneville. 

A. Ray Dixie. 

J. I. Rabb Charlotte. 

J. T. Richardson Matthews. 

R. Russell Walker. 

T. A. Scott Wilmington. 

A. Springs Cureton Store, S. G 

G. W. Thompson Raleigh. 

J. A. Thompson . Winnsboro, S. C. 

J, B. Vaughan Crewe, Va. 

£. Wallace Lawrence, S. C. 

C. White Charlotte. 

J. F. Whitley Martindale. 

A. H. Williams Quogue, L. I. 

J. E. Young Biddleville. 

—52— 



26 KIDDLE UNIVERSITY 



SUMMARY. 

THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Senior Class 2 

Middle Class 5 

Junior Class 5 — 12 

COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 

Senior Class 11 

Junior Class . . . . * 12 

Sophomore Class 16 

Freshmen Class 13 — 52 

PREPARATORY AND NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

Senior , 26 

Junior 46—72 

Second Year 47 

First Year 52 — 99 

Total in in all Departments 235 







: ^»*, 





BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 27 



^rfje lrjelusfpial Ucp<zrpfir)er)l 

H. A. Hunt, Superintendent. 



All students in the Preparatory Course are required to take 
some trade, and report every day for work in the Industral De- 
partment. 

At present three trades are being taught — Carpentering, Print- 
ing and Shoe makine- Each student is allowed to have his choice 
of the trades being taught, buf no changes will be allowed after the 
choice is once made. One-sixth of the time in recitation hours is 
devoted to industrial training. 

WOOD WORK--H. A Hunt, Foreman. 

Carpentry and Joinery are taught in a room provided with 
twelve cabinet benches, each of which is fitted up with a set of 
carpenter's too^ 

Students are taught the use and care of these tools, the prin- 
ciples of wood- working — from drawings and models— and have also 
such practical instruction as can be had from improvements and 
repairs of the buildings and furniture of the University. 

Besides doing the necessary work for the school, a limited 
amount of work is done for outside parties. Two Professors' 
houses have been built by the students during the past year, also a 
boiler-house ; and extensive repairs have been made on other 
buildings. 

THE PRINTING OFFICE--Wm. E. Hill, Foreman. 

This office is equipped as any regular first-class printing estab- 
lishment would be. Besides the ordinary office furniture it has 
three first class printing presses. 

In this office the Africo American Presbyterian and the Bid- 
die University Record are set up and printed, and job work is 
done, thus giving the students actual printing office instruction 
and practice, both in type setting and press-work. The office is 
amply equipped for doing excellent work, and the instruction is 
thorough and practical. 



28 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

THE SHOE SHOP--D. J. Houston, Foreman. 

The shoe shop is fitted up with twelve shoe makers' benches, 
each of which is provided with a set of tools. Students are taught 
the use and care of these tools, and such work as is done in a 
regular shoe shop— sewing, pegging, nailing, cementing, patching, 
half-soling, fitting, lasting, and putting together new work. 

By doing all the work for the students and professors, ample 
opportunity is given for making this branch of work thoroughly 
practical. 

It is proposed to further enlarge this department the coming 
year by adding Tailoring, Blacksmithing, and Masonry ; also, to 
organize a branch of Agriculture. 



^rr)e Horrje Wepapfrrjerjf. 



Rev. Geo. Carson, Superintendent. 

This department includes the orderly keeping of the grounds, 
the supervision of the dormitories and the public buildings, and all 
that pertains to the immediate management of the students as to 
board and home life. 

The Superintendent and his family live among the students 
and give to them such care and attention as they would receive in 
a well organized christian home. 

Except the day students, all are required to live in this depart- 
ment. 

The cost of living is eight dollars ($8.00) per month, payable 
two months in advance, which includes boarding, furnished rooms, 
light, fuel and washing, except wearing apparel. This can be had 
at one dollar per month. 

Boarders are not received for less than one month, and no 
deduction can be made for absence unless ordered by the Faculty. 

THE SECOND YEAR. 
The School Year consists of one session of two terms, com- 
mencing on the first Wednesday of October, and closing on the 
first Wednesday of June. Students wishing to enter should make 
early application. The best Interests of the Institution and of the 
student require that he report himself for duty promptly at the 
opening of each term. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 2Q 

TUTION. 

There is no charge for tution, except in the case of local 
students, who are charged $3 per session. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two flourishing literary societies — the Mattoon and 
the Clariosophic. The exercises consist of composition, discussion 
and debate, and there is a Moot Court connected with them. These 
societies are governed by laws enacted by themselves, and their 
officers are also elected by themselves. The students are expected 
to attend upon the exercises. The whole is under the supervision 
of the Faculty. 

THE LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

Two large airy rooms on the first floor of the main building 
have been set apart as Library and Reading Room. 

The former contains about 5,000 volumes of commentaries 
and religious literature, and also, a variety of the works of standard 
authors. About 200 volums and 85 pamphlets have been added 
during the year. 

The latter is well supplied with many of the best religious and 
secular weekly and daily papers. 

The students have frequent access to Libaray and Reading 
Room under special regulations. 

COLLEGE Y. M. C. A. 

A college branch of the Y. M. C. A. is in sucessful operation, 
with a membership of over 100. It is earnestly desired that all the 
students identify themselver with this noble work. 

PECUNIARY AID. 

Candidates for the ministry, and young men of promise, will 
receive such aid as their necessities and the resources at command 
will allow. Friends in Scotland have established a fund of over 
$6,000, the interest of which is to be used to aid young men pre- 
paring for mission work in Africa. 

LOCATION AND DESIGN IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE 

INSTITUTION. 

The University is located at Charlotte, North Carolina, and is 
named in memory of the late Maj. Henry J. Biddle, of Philadel- 
phia, whose widow, Mrs. Mary C. Biddle, has been one of its most 
liberal supporters. It is chartered by the Legislature of the State 



30 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

and is under the auspices of the Presbyterian Board of Missions 
for Freedmen of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. 

The object of the Institution is the education of colored teach- 
ers and preachers, and leaders for the race in other walks of life. 

It stands at the terminus of seven railroads, in the midst of a 
dense and comparatively intelligent colored population, and occu- 
pies a site of 60 acres in the suburbs of the city. 

It is situated in the heart of the South Atlantic region, which 
contains the two Synods of Atlantic and Catawba, having 275 
colored churches, 156 ministers, multitudes of young men in prep- 
aration for the ministry, with a large number of schools and acade- 
mies under their care These schools and churches must be furnished 
with intelligent Christian teachers and preachers, who must be 
largely educated on the field, and in contact with the people among 
whom they are to labor. Such a training is given here at less 
expense than it could be elsewhere; the student has the best oppor- 
tunities for a liberal education together with the refining influence 
of a christian home, and he is kept at the same time in contact and 
sympathy with his people. 

WANTS OF THE INSTITUTION. 

1st. In the language of a Secretary of the Freedmen 's 
Board, "Permanent Endowment Funds for the adequate support 
of the Professors, is an imperative necessity." $5,000 have been 
secured for the President's Chair. 

2nd. Scholarships: the establishment of which shall yield $100 
each per annum, to enable needy and promising students in the 
higher departments to pursue their studies, continuously, through 
the college year; and in addition to this a few hundred dollars 
annually to be placed in the hands of the Faculty, to be used at its 
discretion, in aiding needy and worthy students, is a great desid- 
eratum. 

3rd. Donations of clothing, for distribution among needy 
students, are earnestly solicited. 

4th. Useful books for the Library are much needed, works of 
reference, biography, history and science. A Library fund is 
much needed, that purchases may be made from lime to time of 
new and useful books. 

5th. Three thousand and five hundred dollars to aid in enlarg- 
ing and improving the Industrial Department 

6th. Twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) for the erection 
and fitting up of a substantial brick dormitory for the accomoda- 
tion of 250 students. 



BTDDLE UNIVERSITY. 3 I 



CONCLUSION. 



No Institution in the care of the Presbyterian Church has a 
wider field or greater opportunities. Its studen s are gathered from 
all the South Atlantic Stages, and are scattered in their school and 
church work through all this vast region, and as iar west as Texas. 

The Institution is consecrated to the glory of God and the 
welfare of a needy race. It is the only Institution of its kind 
maintained by our Presbyterian Church in the South ; and it certainly 
is one of the most important agencies in the hands of the Church 
for the accomplishment oi good among eight millions of Afro- 
Americans. It commends itself to the prayers and gifts of all 
good men. 

The importance in the eyes of the Church, of the interests which 
Biddle University represents, is forcibly put in the language of a 
recent circular addressed to churches on its behalf by the Board 
of Missions for frieedmen: — 

"What is done," say they, "for Biddle University, will, in a 
great measure, determine the success of our whole work among the 
Freedmen. 

"It furnishes our only hope of educating native teachers and 
preachers on the field Indifference to the Biddle University is 
indifference to our whole work among- the Freedmen. If liberally 
supported, no missionary undertaking will return speedier and more 
abundant fruit, Where are the men and women who will build up 
this Institution for the glory oi God and the good of a needy race?" 

"Aiming to do a thorough work of education, there can be no 
question that it (Biddle University) is already doing a great work 
with the promise of still greater results hereafter." — Presbyterian 
Journal, June 16, 1892. 

Rev. E. P. Cowan, D.D., Corresponding Secretary of the 
Board of Missions for Freedmen, after a recent visit and careful 
inspection of the work of the Institution, says: 

u The best argument in favor of Biddle University as at present 
organized, is the good condition in which it now is; and the good 
work that is now being done. This can be seen by any one who 
will take the time and trouble to visit the place and examine for 



32 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

himself. The number of students has largely increased, and the 
graduating class will be the largest that has ever gone out from the 
college since it obtained its present charter. 

" The order and decorum of the students is remarkable The 
rules are stringent, and obeyed. The buildings are well kept. 

"The Industrial Department is better organized and more 
efficient than it ever was before in the history of the institution. 
Prof. Hunt, a graduate of Atlanta University, is a practical carpen- 
ter. Under his direction the students have just finished building a 
dwelling-house for one of the professors. Another professor's 
house recently needed a new roof. A student was allowed to take 
the contract, at a certain price, in businesslike way. He hired 
his own men, all students, and finished up the job in workmanlike 
style, to the entire satisfaction of every one and of course slightly 
to his pecuniary advantage. 

" Look into the shoe shop and you find adozen young men 
(the room will hold no more) who an hour before were reading 
Greek and Latin; now they are sitting on cobblers' benches and 
are driving wooden pegs. In the next room a dozen more are 
setting type, while two others are turning a large printing-press, 
and a third man is "feeding" the machine. 

" I visited every class-room in the institution, and found the 
instructor able to instruct; the learner able to learn. I devoutly 
wish that every friend oi the work could visit the school. If this 
were possible, the University would have all the money it needs. 
Its professors are workmen that need not be ashamed. Their work 
suffers most from not being known, or clearly understood. The 
institution is now running up to its utmost capacity as regards 
numbers. The enrollment so far this year is 236 The boys are 
stowed away in their dormitories, in many cases eight in a room. 
Two students sleep in the engine room, and over thirty in the 
main building, which was never intended for dormitory purposes. 

" If the University only had the necessary accomodations and 
scholarships, the roll would easily run up to 500. Over thirty good 
applications for admission this year were declined for lack of room, 
and lack of funds. A new dormitory seems to be an imperative 
necessity. Ten thousand dollars, I should judge, is the least sum 
worth talking about in the present condition of affairs. 

" We have come to the point where the Presbyterian Church, 
in its work among the freedmen, must decide whether it is going 
to have a large strong first- class University or not. Here is our 
opportunity. It is a grand one. If we seize on it, future gene 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 33 

rations will say, How wise! It we neglect it, they will say, How 
foolish." 

In proof of the estimation in which it is held by prominent 
Southern men, see the following extract from a letter by Hon. Z. 
B. Vance, United States Senator from North Carolina : 

'•* * * I am well acquainted with Biddle University, and I 
think it better circumstanced to do good than any other Institution 
of the kind in the south. The whole people of the region are fully 
in accord with its objects. " 

From Rev. Drury Lacy, D, D., late President of Davidson 
College, North Carolina: 

,% I firmly believe that Biddle University is doin^ a greater work 
for missions, foreign and domestic, than any mission at home or 
abroad ' ' 

From Dr. E. Nye Hutchison: 

"It is my earnest prayer that some liberal Presbyterian may 
fully endow Biddle University, and make it not only useful to its 
generation at home, but a blessing to the world." 

Contributions to any of the objects above named may be sent 
to the Treasurer of the Board of Trustees, Rev. D. I. Sanders, D. 
D., President, or to Rev. J. T. Gibson, No. 516 Market Street 
Pittsburg, Pa., Treasurer of the Presbyterian Board of Missions for 
Freedmen. 



34 BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



i. No one under twelve years of age will be admitted to the 
school. Applicants who are strangers to the faculty must bring a sat- 
isfactory certificate of good character, and steady, industrious habits. 
Every student by his enrollment contracts to obey the regulations 
of the University. 

2. Students are expected at all times to act with respect and 
courtesy toward their instructors and fellow-students, and observe 
cleanliness and neatness in person, clothing and room 

3 All students except day scholars, are required to attend 
chapel exercises each morning, general prayer-meeting Saturday 
evening, Sabbath School and evening service on the Sabbath, as 
well as their regular recitations. Day scholars are required to 
attend chapel exercises each morning except Saturday. 

4. In order to preserve health cultivate manual skill, develop 
taste, and, at the same time, keeo the buildings in order, and im- 
prove and beautify the grounds, all students except day scholars, are 
required to work one hour each day. 

5. Students from abroad are required to board in the Home 
unless excused by the laculty; and when so excused shall be regar- 
ded as day scholars, and shall pay $1.50 per term. 

Board, including furnished room, light, fuel and washing of bed 
clothes, is $8 00 per calendar month, payment two months in ad- 
vance. Any student, who, without satisfactory arrangement, shall 
not pay within ten days from the first of the month, shall forfeit the 
privileges of the institution. 

6. Day pupils must pay their dues $1 50 per term, at the begin- 
ning of each term, and while on the grounds be subject to all the 
rules of the institution. ( 

7. Punctuality and diligence in regard to all duties and exercises 
are required. 

8. During the time set apart for study, students will remain in 
their rooms or in such places as may be designated for study. 
Talking, loud studying, or visiting from room to room during study 
hours and boisterous rude conduct in any of the buildings at any 
time are prohibited. All students are expected to be in their 
rooms and quiet between 10 p. m., and 6 a. m. All lights out at 
10.30 p, m. 

9 Low, vulgar or profane language, the use of ardent spirits, 
wine or beer, tobacco in anv form, keeping or handling of pistols, 
and all games of chance are prohibited. 

10. Students are forbidden to mark or deface in any way 
the buildings or furniture, or to throw slops, waste water, paper or 
anything that would cause a nuisance from the windows or about 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



35 



the grounds. Any damage done by wantonness or carelessness 
must be paid for by the person doing the same 

Students are forbidden to entertain other students, their 



ii. 

friends or strangers in their rooms over night. Students having 
friends for whom they desire either meals or lodging will report 
to the Superintendent. 

12. The students are forbidden to hold any public meetings on 
the premises of the University for any purpose whatever without 
special permission from the President. 

13 The students are forbidden to give entertainments of any 
character and invite guests without special permission. 

14 Students are allowed to attend church in Charlotte on Sab- 
bath afternoon ; but no one will be permitted to leave the grounds 
at other times without special permission. 

15. A monitor shall be appointed for each floor or building 
who shall report anv neglect of duty, or disorder. 

16. Violation of the rules will subject the offender to discipline. 



TIME TABLE. 



6-00 A. M. — Rising Bell. 

6-45 " — Warning Bell. 

7-00 " — Breakfast. 

8-25 " — Cadet Inspection. 

8-30 " — Chapel, Warning Bell. 

8-40 " — Chapel Bell. 

8-45 " — Gong — Doors Closed. 

9-00 " — 1st Recitation. "] R ,, 
10-00 " —2d Recitation. | Th 6 ree 
11-00 " —3d Recitation. }■ Minutes 
1200 M. -4th Recitation, j Befofe 
12-45 p - M — Close. J 



12-50 p. 


M^ — Dinner. 


1-45 ' 


' — Gong— 1st Rec. ] Bell 3. 


2-30 ' 


' — Gong — 2d Rec. [■ Mins. 


3i5 ' 


' — Gong — Close. J Before 


4-00 ' 


' —Work Hour Bell. 


5 00 ' 


' —Cadet Drill. 


6-00 


' — Supper. 


7-00 


' —Study Hours Bell. 


Q-45 ' 


' —Close Study Hours Bell. 


10-00 


' —Night Bell. 



STUDY HOURS. 



MONDAY . . From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 
TUESDAY . . From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 
WEDNESDAY From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 



THURSDAY From 7 00 to 9-45 p. M. 
FRIDAY . From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 
SATURDAY From 9-00 to 12 A. M. 



MEETINGS 



SUNDAY 8-30 A. M. Warn'g S. S. Bell 


SUNDAY 


SUNDAY 8-40 A. M., S. S. Bell. 


. SUNDAY 


SUNDAY 8-45 A. M , Gong. 


SUNDAY 



7 30 P. M., Ch. Warn'g Bell. 
7-50 P. M., Church Bell. 
8-00 r. M., Church Gong. 



TUESDAY 6-30 P. M., Students' Prayer Meeting. 
THURSDAY 6-30 P. M., Y. M. C. A. Meeting. 
FRIDAY 7-00 to 9-45 P. M., Societies. 



36 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY, 



Each student on entering the University is required to sign 
the following: 

I, A B t , now entering Biddle University as a student, do 
solemnly promise to obey all the rules and regulations for the 
government of students, as long as I remain a member thereof. 

{Signed) A B. 



1893. 

Friday, June 2, 7.30 p+ m. Preparatory closing exercises. Address 

by S. J. Bampfreld, Esq , Beaufort, S. C. 
Sunday, June 4, 3 p. m. Baccalaureate Sermon by Rev. D. J. 

Sanders, D. D. 
Monday, June 5, 7.30 p. m. Junior Prize Contest. 
Tuesday, June 6, 7.30 p. m. Address before the Alumni by R. H. 

Richardson, Esq., Class ot '81. 
Wednesday, June 7, 10.30 a, m. Commencement Exercises. At 
3 p. m., Annual Address by Col. Elliott F. Shepard, of New 
York. Rev. John F. Patterson, Pittsburg, Penna., alternate. 
Tuesday, Oct. 3, 3 p. m. Examination of applicants for admission 

begins. 
Wednesday, Oct. 4, First Term begins. 
Friday, Dec. 22, Winter Vacation begins. 

1894. 

Thursday, Jan, 25, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
Thursday, Feb, 1, Second Term begins. 

Friday, March 30, Joint Exhibition of the Literary Societies. 
Wednesday, June 6, Commencement. 










>©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©£ 



CAl^LOGUK^r 

of rwf 



OK 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY, 

charlotte:, n. c. 

1893-94 : 



WITH 



Quarto-Centennial Addenda. 

J©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 



/ 



ERRATA. 

Page 20. Sophomore Class — Name of J. W. Watkins omitted. 

Page 50, Theological Department — Name of Samuel H. Robinson omitted. 

Page 56. Class of '93 — Name of W. W. Muldrow omitted. 

Page 56. The 31 names arranged in 3 columns, following Class of 93 constitute Class 
of '94. 




fo^.V&8m$ 







TWENTY-FIFTH 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OR 

Biddle University, 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



i8q3-'94. 



Under the Care of the Board of Missions for Frerdmen of tr] 
Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A.. Pittsburg, Pa. 



]^0<ai»d o| yrusfees. 



Class whose term will expire June ist, 1894 

REV. A. S. BILLINGSLEY, Statesville, N, C. 
REV. S. LOOMIS, A. M„ Tryon City, N. C. 
REV. H. N. PAYNE, D D.. Atlanta, Ga. 
* HON. W. B. NEGLEY, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1895. 
REV. D. S. BAKER, Lincolnton, N. C. 
REV. J. P. E. KUMLER, D D., P.ttsburg, Pa. 
MR. ROBERT S. DAVIS, Pittsburg, Pa. 
J. C. McCOMBS, Esq., Pittsburg, Pa. 
PROF. H. A. GREEN, Chester, S. C. 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1896. 
REV. G. C. CAMPBELL, Burkeville, Va. 
REV. DAVID BROWN, Wilmington, N C. 
REV. R. P. WYCHE, Charlotte, N. C. 
REV. W. R. COLES, Aiken, S. C. 



w 



icers- 



REV. A. S. BILLINGSLEY, President. 
REV. D. J. SANDERS, D D., TREASURER. 
REV. R. P. WYCHE, Secretary. 

* Deceased. 








? 








-f-jti^ cm^JL 



/ 




TjZ^^&^f 



Ketoully. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 

President, and Professor of Systematic and Ecclesiastical Theology. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D., Ph. D , 

Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis and German. 

Rev. Yorke Jones, A. B. 

Professor of Homiletics, History, Rhetoric and English Literature. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Christian Evidence, 

Rev. A, U. Frierson, A. B., 

Professor of Greek. 

Prof. Geo. E. Davis, A. M., 

Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. B., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. W. F. Brooks, D. D., 

Professor and Principal of Preparatory Department. 

J. D. Martin, A. B., 

Assistant Professor. 

P. G. Drayton, A. B., 

Assistant Professor. 

H. A. Hunt, A. B., 

Superintendent of the School of Industries. 

Rev. Geo. Carson, 

Superintendent of Home, and College Pastor. 

A. U. Frierson. 

Librarian. 

Geo. E. Davis. 

Secretary of Faculty. 



yt)e ©crjool 0] yrjej^loqv 



FACULTY. 



Rev. D. J Sanders, D. D., 
President, and Professor of Systematic and Ecclesiastical Theology. 

Rev. A P. Bissell, D. D., Ph. D., 
Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis 

Rev. Yorke Jones. A. B , 
Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History and Homiletics. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave D D., 
Professor of Christian Evidences and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of Greek Exegesis. 





Senior Class. 






NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


COLLEGE, GRADUATED. 


Neptune N. Gregg . . 


. Sumter, S. C. . . 


. Biddle . 


. 1891 


Henry L. Peterson . . 


. Mayesville, S. C . 


. Biddle . 


. 1891 


Samuel H. Robinson . . 


. Chester, S. C. . . 


. Biddle . 


. 


Jacob A. Tillman . . . 


. . Ansonville, N. C. 


. Biddle . 


. 1891 


Calvin M. Young . . 


. Due West, S. C. . 


. Biddle . 


. 1891 



— 5— 



NAME. 

Edward W. Allen 
Henry L. McCrory 
James M. McKay 
Hyder M. Stinson 



Middle Class. 



RESIDENCE. 



COLLEGE. GRADUATED. 



Winnsboro, S. C. . Biddle . 
Chester, S. C. . . . Biddle . 
Ridgway, S C. . . Biddle . 
Land's Ford, S. C. . Biddle . 
— 4— 



1892 
1892 

1892 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



Junior Class. 



RESIDENCE. 



NAME. 

James H. Cooper . 
^Etius A. Crooke . 
William P. Donnell 
Alexander L. Martin 
Walter B. Middleton . 

John C Stanton Sandifer, N. C. 

Timothy R. Veal Winnsboro, S. C. 

D. C. Wilkes, Chester, S. C. . 

Pharis A. White Richmond, Ky. 

— 9— 



COLLEGE. GRADUATED* 



. Manning, S. C. . . Biddle . 

. Monroe, N. C. . Livingstone 

. Greensboro, N. C. . Biddle . 

Biddleville, N. C. . Biddle . 

. Charleston, S. C, . . Biddle . 

. . Whiting 

Biddle . 

Biddle . 

Berea . 



Total Number in the School of Theology, 18. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



The numerals in brackets indicate the nu?nber of weekly recitations. 



Junior Year.— First Term 

Hebrew — Grammar and Manual . . . [5] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [4] The Gospels. 

Biblical Introduction ...... [2] 

Biblical History [2] 

Christian Evidences [1] 

Homiletics , [2] 



1893 
1893 
1893 

1893 

1893 

1893 



Junior Year. — Second Term. 

Hebrew — Grammar and Manual . . . [5] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [4] The Gospels. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Bible History [2] 

Systematic Theology [1] Hodge's Outlines. 

Homiletics [2] 



6 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Middle Year. — First Term. 

Hebrew — Historical Books £2] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Church History [2] 

Theology [4] Hodge's Outlines. 

Christian E' hics [1] 

Homiletics [2] Broadus. 

Apologetics . . fi] 

Middle Year. — Second Term. 

Hebrew — Historical Books [2] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church Government [2] 

Church History [2] 

Theology [4] Hodge's Outlines. 

Christian Ethics [1] 

Homiletics [2] Broadus. 

Apologetics [1] 

Senior Year. — First Term. 

Hebrew — Prophecy and Poetry . . . [2] 

Greek Exegesis . . . [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church History . . [2] 

Theology [2] Hodge's Outlines. 

Church Government [2] 

Pastoral Theology [2] 

Senior Year. — Second Term 
Hebrew — Prophecy and Poetry . . . [2] 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church History [2] 

Theology [2] Hodge's Outlines. 

Apologetics [2] 

Homiletics [2] 



OLD TESTAMENT.— Professor Bissell. 

i. During 1892-3, and every second year, a course upon Old 
Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice a week for 
half the year. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 7 

2. Junior Class. Hebrew begun. Recitations five times a 
week throughout the year. Text book: Harper's Elements of He- 
brew, Harper's Introductory Hebrew Method and Manual. Special 
emphasis is laid upon the acquisition of a vocabulary. The inflec- 
tions of the language and several hundred of the commonest words 
are memorized. There is daily drill in reciprocal oral translation 
and in writing Hebrew. 

3. Middle Class. Reading from the Historical Books twice a 
week throughout the year. Text book: Hebrew Bible, Harper's 
Hebrew Syntax, Driver's Hebrew Tenses Special attention will 
be given to the Syntax, to enlarge the vocabulary and to rapid 
reading. For a part of the year the class will take English Bibles 
to the blackboards and, with these alone, write the Hebrew from 
memory. 

4. Senior Class. Reading at sight from the Historical Books. 
Exegesis of Hebrew Prophecy and Poetry, twice a week through- 
out the year. 

5. During 1893-4, an d every second year, such members of 
the Middle and Senior classes as are qualified for it, may make a 
beginning in Comparative Semitic Grammar by reading compara- 
tively the first chapters of Genesis in Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac 
and Arabic. 



NEW TESTAMENT. -Professor Bissell. 

* 
i. During 1893-4, and every second year, a course upon New 

Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice a week for 

half the year. 

2. a. Junior Class will read the remaining three Gospels with 

reference to the* Harmony, and, also, to the distinctive character of 

each of the four Gospels, four times a week throughout the year. 

b. Middle Class will read Ephesians with exegesis, twice a week 
through the year. The other Epistles of the captivity, Philippians, 
Colossians, and Philemon, will be assigned for private reading. 
A summary of their contents will be considered in the class room, 
and they will be required in the examination. 

c. Senior Class will read Romans with exegesis, twice a week, 
through the year. The other Epistles of the third Missionary 
Journey, I Corinthians, II Corinthians, and Galatians will be 
assigned for private reading. Their scope and contents will be 
discussed in the school-room, and they will be required in exam- 
ination. 



8 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY.-Dr, Sanders. 

In this Department the purpose is to have each student read 
during his course, some standard work on Systematic Theology, 
and in addition to this to read some authority on Theism. 

This course of reading will be made the subject of the most 
thorough examination and fre* discussion, and will be supplemented 
by every available means which are likely to encourage and stimu- 
late the student in his search for truth, and in preparations for its 
defence. 

Systematic Theology is begun in the second term of the Junior 
year, and completed in the Senior year. The doctrines of Theology 
are presented didactically, historically, and polemically. The order 
ot topics pursued is: The nature, forms, and sources of Theology; 
the being of God, His nature and attributes; the Trinity; the 
Divinity of Christ; the Holy Spirit; the decrees of God; creation; 
providence; miracles; the origin, nature and primitive state of man; 
the covenant with Adam; the fall; sin; imputation; original sin; 
inability; the covenant of grace; the person of Christ; His offices; 
the nature, necessity, perfection, and extent of the atonement; His 
kingdom; His humiliation and exaltation; vocation; regeneration; 
faith; justification; sanctification ; the law of God; the sacraments; 
eschatology. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Homiletics. — Professor Jones. — The work of this Department is 
carried on throughout the Seminary Course. In the Junior and 
Middle years, a text-book on the "Preparation and Delivery of 
Sermons, ' ' is read This is supplemented by exercises in the analysis 
of Sermons, and preaching before the Professors and students of the 
University weekly. 

In the Middle and Senior Classes much attention is given to the 
preparation and criticism of Sermon plans and extempore preaching. 

Christian Evidence. — Dr. Hargrave. — By means of Text- 
books and discussions the student is aided in verifying the Biblical 
proofs of doctrine and Christian truth as represented in the symbols 
of the church, and he is thus trained to express with facility and 
clearness the revealed will of God. 

Pastoral Theology. — The treatment of this subject is confined 
to the third year of the course. It is designed that each student 
shall become thoroughly acquainted with the best method of 
applying the message of salvation to the hearts and lives of men. 
Lectures are given, accompanied by use of text-book. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 9 

The course includes the importance of ministerial piety, proper 
habits of study, skill and ability in the various branches of church 
work, the pastor's relation and duty to the various courts of the 
church, and the various private and public duties pertaining to his 
office 

Church Government. — Dr Sanders. — Four lectures on the 
general subject are given to the Junior Class. 

In the Middle ye*r, the Form of Government with proof texts, 
is taken up and pursued through one term, and a minute com- 
parison with other forms of church polity is made. 

In the Senior year, Dr. Hodge's work, "What is Presbyterian 
Law?" and the Book of Discipline are used as text-books, accom 
panied by lectures, 

BIBLICAL AND ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY-Prof. Jones. 

Since Sacred History is of vital importance as a part of a thor- 
ough Theological Education, the subject is pursued through the 
entire three years' course, 

Biblical History is studied by the Junior Class with the English 
version of the Old Testament as a text book, and Smith's Old 
Testament History as a guide, and is taught by lectures and con- 
stant reference to the typical and preparatory nature of the Old 
Testament. The connection between sacred and profane History 
is pointed out and attention is given to Archaeology, Geography, 
and Chronology, 

Ecclesiastical History. — This subject is taken up by the Middle 
class and is taught by lectures and with text book, covering the 
period from Apostolic times to the Reformation — 16th Century. 

The Senior Class continues the subject from the Reformation 
to the present time, devoting the second term to the history of the 
Presbyterian church in the United States. 

During each year a carefully prepared thesis, having for its 
subject some leading personage, epoch, or phase, etc., of sacred 
history, is required from each student. 



IO BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

INFORMATION. 



ADMISSION. 



This School is open to young men of all denominations. 
Candidates for admission must produce evidence that they are 
members in good and regular standing in some evangelical Church; 
that they possess competent talent; and that they have been regu 
larly graduated at some College or University, or in some way they 
have received an equivalent for the training of a College course. 
Applicants for admission to an advanced standing must present 
a dismission from some other Theological Seminary, or be pre- 
pared for examination on the subjects which have been pursued by 
the class which they desire to enter. 

When a student who has been a member of any other Theo- 
logical School seeks admission into this, he must produce certificate 
of good standing and orderly dismission, ere he can be received. 

EXCEPTIONAL CASES. 

In exceptional cases, promising young men who have not had 
the benefit of a full college course will be received, and will be al- 
lowed to pursue an eclectic course. 

PERIOD OF STUDY. 

The regular course of study, as in the other Seminaries of the 
Church, covers a period of three full years. 

PRACTICAL WORK 

The practical w >rk of the Ministry is joined with study, as the 
theological students have opportunities of laboring as catechists 
in the neighboring churches during vacation and term time. 

With the facilities at hand special and successful efforts are 
made to aid students in obtaining vacation employment along the 
lines of their future work as teachers and preachers among the 
people. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

Except in a few particulars the students of the School of Theology 
are not subject to the rules and regulations which govern those of 
the other Schools of the University. 



BIDDLE UNITERSITY. I I 



ROOMS. 



The rooms in Divinity Hall, so far as is necessary, are reserved 
for Theological Students. These rooms are furnished with a bed- 
stead, mattress, pillows, bureau, washstand, chairs, looking-glass, 
etc., and are heated by steam. 

EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition or room rent i^There is a 
charge of $8.00 per month for board in connection with the Board- 
ing Department, where all students living on the grounds are 
required to board. This fee of $8. 00 per month covers also expenses 
of fuel, light, and washing of towels and bed clothing. 

Books can be bought on the ground at a liberal discount. 

THE EXAMINATION, 

The next Annual Examination will be conducted during the 
last week in May. The examination will be oral and written. 
Each student is required to take this examination, and if by sickness 
or absence one fails to take it, he must submit to an examination 
with a corresponding class in a subsequent year. 



r)©©! 0j /i^fs. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D.., 
President. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, A. B., 
Professor of Greek. 

Rev. Yorke Jones, A. B , 
Professor of English Literature, Rhetoric and History. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science, and the Evidence 

of Christianity. 

Prof. Geo. E. Davis, A. M., 
Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. B . 
Professor of Mathematics, and Assistant in La- in. 

A. P. Bissell, D. D., 
Professor of Modern Languages. 



COURSES, DEGREES AND TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

The School of Arts embraces two courses of study, the 
Classical and the Scientific. Students completing the Classical 
Course satisfactorily, receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts; those 
completing the Scientific Course, that of Bachelor of Science. 
Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are examined in 
the studies prescribed in our Preparatory Course, or their equiva- 
lent, in case of those coming from other schools. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. I 3 

For advanced standing the candidate, in addition to the pre- 
paratory studies will be examined in those previously studied by 
the class he wishes to enter, or others equivalent to them. 

Stenography, Typewriting and Book keeping will be pnt in 
the course the coming year. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

The numerals in brackets indicate the number of weekly recitations 

classical course. 

Freshman Year. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek .... Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, III. IV . [4] 

Grammar, Godwin [4] 

Latin Virgil, Greenough [4] 

Allen and Greenough [4] 

History Myers [2] 

Bible [i] 

Sophomore Year. — First Term. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworth ......... [2] 

Greek Homer Iliad, Books I, II, III . . [4] 

Latin ... Horace, Satires and Epistles [4] 

History Myers [2] 

Natural Science . Physics, Gage [3] 

Bible [1] 

Sophomore Year. — Second Term. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry. Wentworth [4] 

Greek Xenophon's Memorabilia . [4] 

Latin Tacitus's Germania and Agricola .... [4] 

Natural Science . Physics, Gage; and Botany, Wood . . . [3] 
Bible . [i] 



14 RIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Junior Year. — First Term. 

Mathematics . . Plane Trigonometry and Ana'l Geometry . [3] 

Greek Plato, Apology and Crito [4] 

Natural Science . Physical Geography, Maury [4] 

Rhetoric Genung [4] 

Junior Year. — Second Term. 

Mathematics . . . Surveying [3] 

Greek New Testament, one of the Gospels . . I r -, 

Euripides, Ephigenia Among the Taurians J L4J 

Natural Science . Astronomy, Young [4] 

English Literature [2] 

Rudiment. Psychol. . Steele [2] 

Senior Year. — First Term. 

Greek New Testament [2] 

Chemistry .... Williams [4] 

Political Economy, Laughlin [2] 

Logic Jevous, Hill . [2] 

Mental Philosophy . Haven, with Lectures [2] 

English Literature [1] 

Evidences of Christianity . Barrows [2] 

Senior Year. — Second Term 

Greek New Testament [2] 

Zoology Steele [4] 

Civil Government . Thorpe [2] 

Ethics Robinson - . . [2] 

Mental Philosophy . Haven With Lectures [2] 

Science and Religion . Frazer [3] 



scientific course. 

Freshman Year. 

Mathematics . . . Algebra and Geometry, Wentworth . . [4] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

German . [4] 

History Myers [2] 

Bible [1] 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. I 5 

Sophomore Year. — First Term. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworth [2] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

German [3] 

History Myers [2] 

Natural Science . Physics, Gage [3] 

. Physical Geography, Appleton's .... [4] 

Bible [1] 

Sophomore Year. — Second Term. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

German [3] 

Natural Science . Physics, Gage; and Botany, Wood . . . [3] 
Bible [1] 

Junior Year. — First Term. 

Mathematics . . . Trigonometry and Ana'l Geometry . . [3] 

Civil Government [4] 

Natural Science . Physical Geography, Maury [4] 

Rhetoric Genung [4] 

Junior Year. — Second Term. 

Mathematics . . . Surveying [3] 

Greek New Testament, one of the Gospels . . [4] 

Natural Science . Astronomy, Young [4] 

English Literature [2] 

Rudiment. Psychol. Steele [2] 

Senior Year. — First Term. 

Greek New Testament [2] 

Natural Science . Chemistry, Williams ... . . .[4] 

Political Economy, Laughlin [2] 

Logic Jevous, Hill [2] 

Mental Philosophy . Haven with Lectures [2] 

English Literature [1] 

Evidences of Christinity . Barrows [2] 

Sacred History [2] 



1 6 bjddjle university. 

Senior Year. — Second Term. 

Greek ...... New Testament [2] 

Zoology Steele [4] 

Civil Government . Thorpe [2] 

Ethics Robinson [2] 

Mental Philosophy . Ha^en with Lectures [2] 

Science and Religion . Frazer [3] 

Sacred History [2] 

Throughout the College Course there is a weekly recitation in 
the Bible either in English or Greek; also, throughout the course, 
exercises in English Composition and declamation. 



NATURAL SCIENCE--Prof. Davis. 

Outline. 

Physics — Five months 4 times a week. 

Botany — Three months 

Physical Geography — Four months ...... 

Astronomy — Four months 

Chemistry -Five months 

Zoology— Three months 

1. Physics. 

During the Sophomorey ear, the following topics, with others, 
will be treated. Mathematical Physics, Molecular Physics, Hydros- 
tatics, Pneumatics, the Kinetic Theory of Gases, Acoustics; 
Electricity and Magnetism, the Correllation and Conservation of 
Energy. 

Gage's Elements of Physics is used. 

2. Chemistry. 

Chemistry will be studied during the first five months of the 
Senior year. The work embraces the general treatment of Chemi- 
cal Philosophy, Chemistry of the non-metals, the metals, organic 
Chemistry, and Chemical Archnology. 

The lectures on this subject will be illustrated by experiments 
and be followed by reviews and examinations during the course. 
Apparatus and reagents sufficient for laboratory works will be furn- 
shed the student at a small cost. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. I 7 

Williams's Introduction to Chemical Science will be used in 
connection with lectures. 

3. Astronomy. 

The second half of the Junior year is devoted to the study of 
Astronomy; embracing the elementary principles of mathematical 
and physical Astronomy, such as Parallax Refraction, Latitude and 
Longitude. Precession, Nutation, Abberration. Theory of tides and 
lunar eclipses, and elements of a planet's orbit. 

Young's Elements ot Astronomy is used. 

4. Botany. 

The subject ol Botany is pursued during the last three months 
ot the Sophomore year. The student is required to gather speci- 
mens of flowers and plants; to analyze and classify the same. An 
herbarium of thirty specimens is required. 

Wood's New Botanist and Florist is used. 

5. Zoology. 

The last three months of the Senior Year will be devoted to 
Zoology. Typical forms will be used to illustrate the subjects as 
they may be obtained in the locality. 

Steele's Fourteen Weeks in Zoology is used as a text book. 

6. Physical Geography. 

This subject covers the first half of the Junior year. It will 
be treated mainly by lectures. Mauray's Geography will be used as 
a text-book; but the student will have daily access to such books as 
Mauray's Geography ofth$ Sea, Foye's Child and Nature, Guyot's 
Earth and Man, Goldth waiter's Geographical Magazine, Ritter's 
Comparative Geography, and similar Books for collateral reading. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE.--Prof. Davis. 

Harkness's Latin Grammar will be the standard of reference 
throughout the course. 

Freshman Year: First and Second Terms — Virgil's ^nied 
first four Books. Second term, Juvenal's Satires. 

Sophomore Year: First and Second Term — Satires and Epis- 
tles of Horace. Special attention will be given to scanning the 
metres of Horace. Lectures on Roman life, art and customs will 
occupy part of the last term. 



1 8 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

GREEK. —Prof. Frierson. 

The course of study as outlined is intended or designed to 
lay for the ordinary student a foundation for the successful prose- 
cution of the Greek language and literature. 

The Junior Class will read from the New Testament one of the 
Gospels. Recitation daily till completed. 

The Senior Class will read "The Acts of the Apostles" with 
attention to the growth of the Apostolic Church, Recitation twice 
per week throughout the school year. 

Examination required of each class. 

MODERN LANGUAGE-GERMAN. --Prof. Bissell. 

The study of modern languages has been introduced, but for 
the coming year only the German language will be taught, in the 
Scientific course, pursued by both Sophomores and Juniors. 

MATHEMATICS.--Prof. Pride. 

The required course in Mathematics comprises Plane and Solid 
Geometry, Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Plane Geometry — The Freshmen begin with Plane Geometry 
(Wentworth's), in the study of which special attention is given to 
the exercises for original demonstration and, that a love for and 
interest in the science may be developed, a free discussion of the 
possibilities of each proposition is encouraged. 

Solid and Spherical Geometry. —This is the prescribed course 
for Sophomores, and in order that the students may have a proper 
notion for solid figures as graphically represented on plane surfaces, 
they are encouraged to make their own models for illustration. 
This is facilitated by the co-operation of the Industrial School. 

Trigonometry and Surveying. — The course for Juniors includes 
Trigonometry and Surveying with practical use of instruments. 
Special attention devoted to field work. 

HISTORY.-Prof. Jones. 

The study of General History is carried through the Freshman 
and Sophomore years with text-book and by lectures. On this 
subject there will be two recitations a week. This subject receives 
that careful and exhaustive attention which its importance demands. 

PHILOSPHY.-Dr. Hargrave. 

Psychology* — Rudimentary Psychology is taught during the 
second terms of the Junior year. 



BIDDLE UNITERSITY. 1 9 

Mental Science. — Mental Science is taught through the Senior 
year by the use of text-books and lectures. 

Moral Science. — Moral Science is studied through the second 
term of the Senior Year, and the students are instructed in the 
principles of Theoretical and Practical Ethics. 

Rational Philosophy, or Formal and Particular Logic. — Logic 
is studied so as to make the student familiar with Logical Termi- 
nology and forms, and with the laws of Discursive Thought. 

Civil Government. — Civil Government and the Constitution of 
the United States, and Political Economy, are studied in the Senior 
year, and each student is made acquainted with the government of 
the people of the United States and American citizenship. 

Evidences of Christianity, Science and Religion, and Theism. — 
Instruction in these subjects is given by means of text-books and 
class room discussions during the first term of the Senior year. 



Seniors. 

.£Lsop Patrick Allison Laurens, S. C. 

Joseph Fugene Bowman Walterboro, S. C. 

Junius Gregg Sumter, S. C. 

* William Henry Haig Charleston, S. C. 

Warren Deceal Hood Mt. Gallagher, S. C. 

Anderson James Brown's Rock, S. C. 

Hardy Harvey Muldrow Mayesville, S. C. 

Samuel Means Plair Winnsboro, S. C. 

Joseph Andrew Rollins Charleston, S. C. 

Charles Henry Shute Matthews. 

John Maurice Vaughan Nottaway C. H., Va. 

— 11 — 

Juniors. 

John Henry Clement ... Mocksville. 

John Emmanuel Harris Huntersville. 

John Pride Harrison Rock Hill, S. C. 

Alonzo Jonathan Jefferson Mayesville, S. C. 

Archie Pleasant Johnson Guthriersville, S. C, 

Samson Bryant McLamb ........ Goldsboro, 



* Suspended. 



20 BIDDLE UNIVKKSTTY. 

William Lee Metz Clinton, S. C. 

William Monroe Pressley Anderson, S. C. 

Calvin Elias Radford Doaksville, I. T. 

Dallas Edward Speed Henderson. 

William Henry Stinson Land's Ford, S. C 

Joseph Wallace Stitt Matthews. 

Guy Wadsworth Clinton, S. C 

Frederick Henry Watkins ... ... Erie Mills. 

—14— 

Sophomores. 

Robert James Boulware Flint Hill, S. C. 

H. H. Cardwell Charlotte. 

William Henry Carroll . . . * Waukulla. 

William M. Flowers Cairo. 

Samuel James Grier Winnsboro, S. C. 

James Monroe Henderson Winnsboro, S. C. 

James Alexander Pethel ... ... Charlotte. 

Armand Wendell Scott Wilmington. 

John H. Sampson Pineville. 

Henry C. Littles Coddle Creek. 

Johnson Q. Moses Charlotte. 

— 11 — 

Freshmen. 

Floyd Joseph Anderson Jetersville, Va. 

Howard Warren Bates Cheraw, S C. 

William Randall Conners Savannah, Ga. 

Walter Chresfield Coles . Aiken, S. C. 

Thadeus Jerome Coles Aiken, S. C. 

Charles Washington Ellis Due West, S. C 

Ludie Fielder Wellford, S. C. 

John Jackson Frazier Tradesville, S C. 

Edward Warren Gregg Sumter, S C. 

Miles Junius Jackson Mayesville, S. C. 

Moses Henderson Lewis Greenleaf. 

George Alexander Morrow Greensboro. 

James Eugene Powe Cheraw, S. C. 

Fred. C. Sadgwar, Jr Wilmington. 

Walter Thomas Singleton Cheraw, S. C. 

John Edgar Smith Charlotte. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 2 1 

William Haynesworth Spann Sumter S. C 

Isaac D. L. Torrence Huntersville. 

Samuel Liddell Young Greenville, S. C. 

—19— 
Total in School of Arts, 55. 



INFORMATION. 



Students of the School of Arts are subject to all the Rules and 
Reeulations for the government of the students of the University, 
except that they are exempt from cadet duty and services in the 
School of Industries. 

There are two regular examinations, one near the close of each 
of the two terms. The final grading of the Senior class is now 
based upon in part and made up after the second examination, 
which will be given six weeks earlier each year than the general 
examinations, from which time the class wiU be excused from 
recitations. 

The examinations are oral and written and the requirements 
in connection therewith are absolute, except that a student may be 
conditioned for one term or not more than two studies, and the 
minimum general average for promotion to a higher class is 65, 
and anyone falling below 50 in any three studies is dropped from the 
School. 

Students are required to conform to the prescribed courses in 
every particular unless expressly excused by the Faculty. 

The discipline is impartial and firm, and all demerits arising 
from misconduct or infringement of the Rules and Regulations 
enter in and modify the grading and when the number of demerits 
reaches 25 in nny one term the delinquent is subject to suspension. 



peperperiopv err)<a fyoprner 



A r), 



; 1)0(2)1. 



FACULTY. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 
Presiuent. 

Rev. Wm. F. Brooks, D. D , 
Principal and Professor of English. 

Jas. D. Martin, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of Latin and English. 

P. G. Drayton, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of English, 



The Preparatory School aims to prepare the student thoroughly 
for the studies of either course of the School of Arts. For the 
present, the elementary English course is a necessity, as the large 
majority of the students coming to the Institution have not had the 
opportunity to ground themselves in the common English branches. 
Upon completing the studies of this course, the student is prepared 
to teach in the common schools of the State, as well as to enter the 
Freshman Class. A certificate will be given to each student 
completing this course, 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 23 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Latin . First Latin Book, Tuell and Fowler. 

English . Lessons in Language, Tarbell. 

Mathematics . . Arithmetic and Algebra, Wentworth, Greenleaf. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Spelling, once a week throughout the year. 

Drawing Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term. 

Latin Caesar. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 
Greek Beginner's Greek, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 
English, Composition and Rhetoric, Newcomer, Lockwood, Hill. 

Mathematics Algebra, Wentworth. 

Physiology Walker. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Pedagogy Essentials of Method, De Garmo. 

Second Term. 

Latin Caesar. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 
Greek Beginner's Greek, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 

Mathematics Algebra, Wentworth. 

English Lessons in English, Lockwood. 

Composition and Rhetoric, Newcomer, Hill. 

Book Keeping Scribner. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Spelling, once a week throughout the year. 



24 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

JUNIORS. 

English Lessons in Language, Tarbell. 

Mathematics . . Arithmetic & Algebra. Wmtwoith, Greenleaf. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Penmanship and Spelling, once a we-k throughout the year. 
Drawing Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

SENIORS. 

Latin or Greek First Latin Book, Tuell and Fowler. 

Beginner's Greek, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 

Mathematics Algebra, Wentworth. 

English Rhetoric and Composition. Tarbell. 

Bible Weekly Lessons. Steele's Outlines. 

Natural Science Physiology, Walker. 

Spelling once a week throughout the year. 

Pedagogy Essentials of Method, De Garmo. 



ELEMENTARY ENGLISH COURSE. 

admission. 

All applicants for admission to this course must be at le<st 
twelve years of age, must furnish satisfactory testimonials of g<>od 
moral character, and must be able to p*ss a satisfactory examina- 
tion in the Fourth Reader, Primary Geography, and Arithmetic to 
Fractions. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Reader (Eggleston's U. S. History), Grammar, Graded Les 
sons (Reed and Keilogg's), Arithmetic to Percentage, Geography 
completed (Maury's Manual), with Map Drawing, Spelling. 
Penmanship, Bible (Harper's Smith's Smali History). 

SECOND YEAR. 

Swinton's Fifth Reader. Grammar (Reed and Keilogg's 
Higher Lessons), United States History (Montgomery's), Arith- 
metic to Miscellaneous Examples at end, Spelling, Penmanship, 
Bible (Harper's Smith's Small History). 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 25 

Exercises throughout both years in compositien and declama- 
tion. 

Every student in the Preparatory and Normal School is 
required to take a trade in the School of Industries. 



Senior Prep. 

Zechariah Alexander Charlotte. 

James Richard Alsobrooks Polkton. 

F. M. Boulware Flint Hill, S. C. 

E. C. Byers Davidson. 

L. B. Cooper Sardinia, S. C. 

E. L. Covington Laurinburg. 

Thomas E. Craig Waxhaw. 

Thomas Henry Davis Mayesville, S. C. 

Zander Adam Dockery Mangum. 

Ernest E. Foster Biddleville. 

Taylor Jirardeau Frierson Sumter, S. C. 

C. M. George Orton. 

Bradley Samuel Harris Mayesville, S. C. 

Hugh Harry Winnsboro, S. C. 

* Robert Anderson Hudson Stout. 

W. L. Hudson Stout. 

T. G. Jenkins Enterprise, S. C. 

John Moses Johnson Blackstocks, S. C. 

L. W. Johnson Winnsboro, S. C. 

J. A. Lightner Chester, S. C. 

Isaac M. Martin Mechanicsville, S. 

John Lee Massey Waxhaw. 

Walter Lewis McNair Red Springs. 

*G. M. Mitchell Mayesville, S. C. 

Samuel Isaac Moone Dorroh, S. C. 

J. W. Morrison Matthews. 

Wm. Randolph Muldrow Mayesville, S. C. 

Thomas W. Nance Yorkville, S. C. 

James W. Owens Timmonsville, S.C. 

Moses S. Pharr Biddleville. 

Isaac Henry Russell Mint Hill. 

J. E. Tice Biddle University. 



* Deceased. 



26 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

John Eli Walker Charlotte. 

Beverly Major Ward Jennings Ordinary, Va. 

J. Henry Warren Concord 

F. Watson Nottoway C. H., Va. 

D. F. White Richmond, Ky. 

Richard Edward Williams Goldsboro. 

R. A. Wilson Danville, Va. 

James Wells Young Shelby. 

—40— 

Junior Prep. 

C. E. Aiken Abbeville, S. C. 

C. E. Alexander Lodo. 

C. B. Bailey Clinton. S. C. 

J. R. Baker Lincolnton. 

J. H. Byers . Greensboro. 

Henry J. Canty .... Charlotte. 

L. A. Carruthers Biddleville. 

T. A. Chesfield Monroe. 

* H. D. Coachman Laurinburg. 

J. W. Coleman Charlotte. 

J. W. Cooper Charlotte. 

S. L. Costner . . Sago. 

J. D. Cowan Due West, S. C. 

Charles Henry Dunn .......... Matthews. 

Z. W. Foster Biddleville. 

Alexander Gaston Savannah, Ga. 

J. W. Grier Steele Creek. 

J. W. Gross Denta 

W. H. Jackson Anderson, S. C. 

S. W. James Camden. S. C. 

C. N. Jenkins Wellford, S. C. 

A. B. Johnson Guthresville, S C. 

C. B. Johnson Greenville S. C. 

R. P. Johnson Jetersville, Va. 

t J. H. W. Kelley Louisburg, 

Edgar Leighton Timmonsville, S. C. 

J. J. Mason Keeling, Tenn 

J. E. Mebanes Durham. 

J. H. Miller Grahamville, S. C. 



* Deceased. f Suspended. 



BIDDLE UNITERSITY. 



27 



S. P. Mitchell Mayesville, S. C. 

W. A. Pethel Charlotte. 

R. A. Pindle Abbeville, S. C. 

P. T. Rison . . Danville, Va. 

S. L. Russell . Fort Mott, S, C 

J. J. Sharp Monrovia Liberia, Africa, 

J. A. Smith' Turnersburg. 

W. H. Smith Augusta, Ga. 

G. R. Spaulding Rosindale. 

L. L. Spaulding Rosindale. 

O. F. Vick Wilson. 

William Ward Adam's Run, S. C. 

G. F Wilson Mayesville, S. C. 

W. H. Wright . Amelia C. H., Va. 

—43— 

Second Year English, 

W. H. Ancrum Cash's Depot. 

W. H. Arch Quogue, L. I. 

Jas. Baggett Lumberton. 

C. J. Baker . Grahamville, S. C. 

Robt. Bidding Lexington. 

J. H. Cansler Charlotte. 

W. B. Catus Mt. Airy. 

R. J. Christmas Oxford. 

M. C Cooper . Mayesville, S. C. 

Ed. Crawford Rock Hill, S. C. 

W. Cureton Cureton Store, S. C. 

J. A Davis Pineville. 

C. H Davis Walkup. 

A. H. Dean Wellford, S. C. 

W. Dubose Charlotte. 

S. L. Fulwood Mayesville, S. C. 

C E. Graham Cowan's Ford. 

W. A. Grigg Biddle University. 

H. W. Grigg Biddle University. 

J. C. Hargrave Wilmington. 

Mack Hardy . Spartanburg, S, C. 

C. S. Hawkins Warrenton. 

J. D Howie . , Harrisburg. 

W. B.Hudson Stout. : * 

J. L. Hughes ...... Mebanes. 



28 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

R. C. Jackson Savannah, Ga. 

O. J. Jackson Charlotte. 

W. A. Jenkins Steel Creek. 

N. M. Johnson Harrisburg. 

J. A. Johnson Guthresville, S. C. 

Washington Leak Erie Mills. 

C. R. Means, Jr Charlotte. 

C. R. McClure Biddleville. 

J. M. McLean Shopton. 

G. L. McLean Bunn's Level. 

E. W. Murray Rembert, S. C. 

S. N. Nance Laurens, S. C. 

J. W. Nedd Mayesville, S. C. 

J. A. Nicholson Rockingham. 

J. A. Patterson Matthews. 

Stokes Pressley Manchester, Va. 

M. Raspberry Manchester, Va. 

R. L. Russell Walker. 

Willie Russell Winnsboro, S. C. 

T. A. Sanders Spartanburg, S. C. 

T. A. Scott Wilmington. 

J. L. Scott Danville, Va. 

E. Simms Winnsboro, S. C. 

G. W. Simms Carlisle, S. C. 

W. M. Simons Matthews. 

H. W. Spaulding Rosindale. 

J. W. Starnes Monroe. 

Jno. Torrence . . . • Lodo. 

A. J. Tyson Charlotte. 

Robt. C. Terry Gibson's Mills. 

G. W. Thompson Raleigh. 

J. A. Thompson Winnsboro, S. C. 

Jno. T. Toole Charlotte. 

H. M. Toney Mayesville, S. C. 

R. O. Tyler Biddleville; 

J. B. Vaughan Crewe, Va. 

Wm. Walkup Pineville. , 

C. E. Watkins Erie Mills. 

J. F. Whitley . . Martindale. 

C. White Charlotte. 

J. E. Young Biddleville. 

—66— 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 29 

First Year English. 

A. Alexander Charlotte. 

Wm. Alexander Charlotte. 

Fred Arch Quogue, L. I. 

C. W. Bradshaw Biddleville. 

R. K. Bristow Rock Hill, S. C. 

E. B. Brooks Biddle University. 

I. C. Brown Winnsboro, S. C. 

E. G. Bumpass Durham. 

Jno. Craig Waxhaw. 

W. M. Caldwell Huntersville. 

H. Cansler Charlotte. 

J W. Carter Mayesville, S. C. 

M. Crawford Gastonia. 

Jno. Davis Charlotte. 

Wm. Davidson Charlotte. 

J. E. Hunter Charlotte 

Jno. Feimster Biddleville. 

C. M. Fielder Wellford, S. C. 

E. C. Grigg . . Biddle University. 

J. W. Hill Statesville. 

E. G. Haskins Mebanes. 

T. W, Hughes Mebanes. 

S. Kirk Coddle Creek. 

L. Lineberger Gastonia. 

J. W. Lewis . Munlon, Ga. 

J. W. Massey Waxhaw. 

C. T. McCanely Huntersville. 

R. J. McQain Lodo. 

E. R. McCrorey , . . Chester, S. C. 

W. A. McCrorey Chester, S. C. 

M. Morse Steel Creek. 

J. E. Morrison Matthews. 

Walter Moore Charlotte. 

W. L. Patterson Eastfield,, 

W. M. Pharr Biddleville. 

J. Phifer Charlotte. 

J. W. Pearson Bennettsville, S. C. 

R. W. Pickens Statesville. 

E. M. Reid Nimrod. 

V. F. Rudisill Lincolnton. 

Jos. Saville * Charlotte. 



30 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

J. T. Smith Charlotte. 

A. Stitt Biddleville. 

S. A. Vanderhorst Columbia, S. C 

Odie Walker Charlotte 

R. A. Walker Rock Hill, S C. 

M C. Wallace Charlote. 

C. A. Ward Lincolnton. 

S. W. Withers Steele Creek. 

Mc. C. Whitley Charlotte. 

S. E Whitley Charlotte. 

A. H. Williams Quogue. L. I 

G. L Winn Wedgefield, S. C. 

S. Woodward Lodo. 

—54— 
Total in Preparatory and Normal School 204 



»cr)00l 0j lrjelusfpies. 



H. A. Hunt, Superintendent. 



All students in the Preparatory Course are required to take 
some trade, and report every day for work in the Industrial 
Department. 

At present five trades are being taught — Carpentering, Print- 
ing, Brick making, Plastering and Shoe making. Each student is 
allowed to have his choise of the trades being taught, but no 
changes will be allowed after the choice is once made. One-sixth 
of the time in recitation hours is devoted to industrial training. 

WOOD WORK--H. A. Hunt, Foreman. 

Carpentry and Joinery are taught in a room provided with 
twelve cabinet benches, each of which is fitted up with a set of 
carpenter's tools. 

Students are taught the use and care of these tools, the prin- 
ciples of wood working — from drawings and models — and have also 
such practical instruction as can be had from improvements and 
repairs of the buildings and furniture of the University. 

Besides doing the necessary work for the school, a limited 
amount of work is done for outside parties. Two Professors' 
houses have been built by the students, also a boiler-house; and 
extensive repairs have been made on other buildings. 

THE PRINTING OFFICE— Wm. E. Hill, Foreman. 

This office is equipped as any regular first-class printing estab- 
lishment would be. Besides the ordinary office furniture it has 
three first class printing-presses. 

In this office the Africo- American Presbyterian and the Bid 
die University Record are set up and printed, and job work is 
done, thus giving the students actual printing office instruction 
and practice, both in type-setting and press work. The office is 
amply equipped for doing execellent work, and the instruction is 
thorough and practical. 



32 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY, 



THE SHOE SHOP. 

The shoe shop is fitted up with twelve shoemakers' benches, 
each of which is provided with a set of tools. Students are taught 
the use and care of these tools, and such work as is done in a 
regular shoe shop — sewing, pegging, nailing, cementing, patching, 
halt-soling, fitting, lasting and putting together new work. 

By doing all the work for the students and professoes, ample 
opportunity is given for making this branch of work thoroughly 
practical. 



MASONRY AND PLASTERING. 

These two trades have been introduced, and instruction in 
them is being given daily with very satisfactory results. These 
branches are putting a goodly number in possession of skill that will 
command work and good pay. 

It is proposed to further enlarge this department by adding 
Tailoring and Blacksmithing, also, to organize a branch ol 
Agriculture. 

No of Students in Carpentry 40 

" Printing 37 

" Shoemaking 29 

'' Brickwork 25 

44 Plastering 11 

14 Drawing 14 



Total 



136 



SUMMARY. 

The School of Theology. 

Senior Class 5 

Middle Class 4 

Junior Class 9—18 

The School of Arts. 

Senior Class . ... 11 

Tunior Class 14 

Sophomore Class 12 

The name of J. E. Westberry, omitted from roll of Sophomore Class by mistake. 

Freshman Class 19 — 56 

The Preparatory and Normal School: 

Senior Class 40 

Junior Class 43—83 

Second Year . . . 66 

First Year 54 — 120 

The School of Industries. 
In the five trades 136 

Total 414 

Counted twice 136 

Total enrollment 277 



^Prjc riorr/c yepapfrrjerjf, 



Rev. Geo Carson, Superintendent. 



This department includes the orderly keeping of the grounds, 
the supervision of the dormitories and the public buildings, and all 
that pertains to the immediate management of the students as to 
board and home life. 

The Superintendent and his family live among the students 
and give to them such care and attention as they would receive in 
a well organized christian home. 

Except the day students, all are required to live in this depart- 
ment. 

The cost of living is eight dollars ($8.00) per month, payable 
two months in advance, which includes boarding, furnished rooms, 
light, fuel and washing, except wearing apparel This can be had 
at one dollar peV month. 

Boarders are not received for less than one month, and no 
deduction can be made for absence unless ordered by the Faculty- 



lfUer)£P<2n 1 r)T0prr)0 1 \6q, 



The School Year consists of one session of two terms, com 
mencing on the first Wednesday of October, and closing on the 
first Wednesday of June. Students wishing to enter should make 
early application. The best interests of the Institution and of the 
student require that he report himself for duty promptly at the 
opening of each term. 

TUTION. 

There is no charge for tuition, except in the case of local 
students, who are charged $3 per session. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are four flourishing literary societies — the Mattoon, 
the Clariosophic, the Johnson and the Douglass. The exercises 
consist of composition, discussion and debate, and there is a 
Moot Court connected with them These societies are governed 
by laws enacted by themselves, and their officers are also elected 
by themselves. The students are required each to become a 
member of one of these societies and to attend upon the exercises. 
The whole is under the supervision of the Faculty. 

THE LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

Two large airy rooms on the first floor of the main building 
have been set apart as Library and Reading Room. 

The former contains about 6,000 volumes of commentaries 
and religious literature, and also, a variety of the works of standard 
authors. About 300 volumes and 100 pamphlets have been added 
during the year 

The latter is well supplied with many of the best religious and 
secular weekly and daily papers. 

The students have frequent access to Library and Reading 
Room under special regulations. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 35 



COLLEGE Y. M. C. A. 

A college branch of the Y. M. C. A is in successful operation, 
with a membership of over 100. It is earnestly desired that all the 
students identify themselves with this noble work. 

PECUNIARY AID. 

Candidates for the ministry, and young men of promise, will 
receive such aid as their necessities and the resources at command 
will allow. Friends in Scotland have established a fund of over 
% 6,000, the interest of which is to be used to aid young men pre- 
paring for mission work in Africa 

LOCATION AND DESIGN IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE 

INSTITUTION. 

The University is located at Charlotte, North Carolina, and is 
named in memory of the late M -j Henry J. Biddle, of Philadel- 
phia, whose widow, Mrs. Mary D. Biddle, has been one of its most 
liberal supporters. It is chartered by the Legislature of the State, 
and is under the auspices of the Presbyterian Board of Missions 
for freedmen of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. 

The object of the Institution is the education of cMored teach- 
ers and preachers, and leaders for the race in other walks of life. 

It stands at the terminus of seven railroads, in the midst of a 
dense and comparatively intelligent colored population, and occu- 
pies a site of 60 acres in the suburbs of the city. 

It is situated in the heart of the South Atlantic region, which 
contains the two Synods of Atlantic and Catawba, having 278 
colored churches, 161 ministers, multitudes of young men in prep- 
aration for the ministry, with a large number of schools and acade- 
mies under their care. These schools and churches must be furnished 
with intelligent Christian teachers and preachers, who must be 
largely educated on the field, and in contact with the people among 
whom they are to labor. Such a training is given here at less 
expense than it could be elsewhere; the student has the best oppor- 
tunites for a liberal education together with the refining influence 
of a christian home, and he is kept at the same time in contact and 
sympathy with the people. 



vA/<ar)fs 0] frje Irjsfifulior), 



ist. In the language of a Secretary of the Freedmen's 
Board, "Permanent Endowment Funds for the adequate support 
of the Professors, is an imperative necessity." $5,000 have been 
secured ior the President's Chair. 

2nd. Scholarships: the establishment of which shall yield $100 
each per annum, to enable needy and promising students in the 
higher departments to pursue their studies, continuously, through 
the college year; and in addition to this a few hundred dollars 
annually to be placed in the hands ol the Faculty, to be used at its 
discretion, in aiding needy and worthy students, is a great desid- 
eratum 

3rd. Donations of Clothing, for distribution among needy 
students, are earnestly solicited. 

4th. Useful books for the Library are much needed, works of 
reference, biography, history and science. A Library Fund is 
much needed, that purchases may be made from time to time of 
new and useful books 

5th. Three thousand and five hundred dollars to aid in enlarg- 
ing and improving the School of Industries. 

6th. Twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) for the erection 
and fitting up of a substantial brick dormitory for the accomoda- 
tion of 250 students. 



0r)clusi0r) ( 



No Institution in the care of the Presbyterian Church has a 
wider field or greater opportunities Its students are gathered from 
all the South Atlantic States, and are scattered in their school and 
church work through all this vast region, and as far west as Texas. 

The Institution is consecrated to the glory of God and the 
welfare of a needy race. It is the only Institution of its kind 
maintained by our Presbyterian Church in the South; and it certainly 
is one of the most important agencies in the hands of the Church 
for the accomplishment of good among eight millions of Afro- 
Americans. It commends itself to the prayers and gifts of all 
good men 

The importance m the eyes of the Church, of the interests which 
Biddle University represents, is forcibly put in the language of a 
recent circular addressed to churches on its behalf by the Board 
af Missions for Freedmen : — 

"What is done," say they, "for Biddle University, will, in a 
great measure, determine the success of our whole work among the 
Freedmen." 

"Indifference to the Biddle University is indifference to our 
whole work among the Freedmen If liberally supported, no 
missionary undertaking will return speedier and more abundant 
fruit. Where are the men and women who will build up this 
Institution for the glory of God and the good of a needy race?" 

The Presbyterian Journal says : 

"Aiming to do a thorough work of education, there can be no 
question that it (Biddle University) is already doing a great work 
with the promise of still greater results hereafter." 

Rev E. P. Cowan, D. D., Corresponding Secretary of the 
Board of Missions for Freedmen, says; 

"The best argument in favor of Biddle University as at present 
organized, is the good condition in which it now is, and the good 
work that is now being done. This can be seen by any one who 
will take the time and trouble to visit the place and examine for 
himself. 



38 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

"The order and decorum of the students is remarkable. The 
rules are stringent, and obeyed. The buildings are well kept. 

"The Industrial Department is better organized and more 
efficient than it ever was before in the history of the Institution. 
Professor Hunt, a graduate of Atlanta University, is a practical 
carpenter. 

"Look into the shoe shop and you find a dozen young men 
(the room will hold no more) who an hour before were reading 
Greek and Latin; now they are sitting on cobblers' benches and 
are driving wooden pegs. In the next room a dozen or more are 
setting type, while two others are turning a large printing-press, 
and a third man is "feeding" the machine. 

"I visited every dass room in the institution, and found the 
instructor able to instruct; the learner able to learn. I devoutly 
wish every friend of the work could visit the school. If this 
were possible, the University would have all the money it needs. 
Its professors are workmen that need not be ashamed. Their work 
suffers most from not being known, or clearly understood. The 
institution is now running up to its utmost capacity as regards 
numbers. The boys are stowed away in their dormitories, in many 
cases eight in a room Two students sleep in the engine room, 
and over thirty in the main building, which was never intended for 
dormitory purposes. 

"If the University only had the necessary accomodations and 
scholarships, the roll would easily run up to 500. Over thirty good 
applications for admission this year were declined for lack of room, 
and lack of funds. A new dormitory seems to be an imperative 
necessity. 

"We have come to the point where the Presbyterian Church, 
in its work among the freedmen, must decide whether it is going 
to have a large strong first class University or not. Here is our 
opportunity. It is a grand one If we seize on it. future gene- 
rations will say, How wise! If we neglect it, they will say. How 
foolish." 

In the May Number of the Chnrch at Home and Abroad, Rev. 
Edward B. Hodge. D D., Corresponding Secretary of the Board of 
Education of the Presbyterian Church, says: "A recent visit to 
Charlotte, N. C, enabled the Secretary to make something of an 
inspection of the working of Biddle University. The situation of 
the institution is most delightful, commanding a wide view of the 
surrounding country. It is sufficiently far from town for the 
purpose of academic seclusion, and yet near enough for all purposes 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 39 

of convenience. President Sanders presides over the institution 
with ability, prudence and skill to a degree that commends him to 
the favorable comments of such intellegent observers as the pastors 
of the Presbyterian Churches in Charlotte. It is very gratifying to 
find with what interest they are regarding our work among the 
colored people. One of them recentlv personaly visited Biddle 
University and made a most acceptable address to the students. 
There is great need for additional room for students. The 
number is far larger than can be properly accommodated. It 
is delightful to find what an eagerness for learning the students 
display, and in many cases a very decided apitude. The order 
and discipline of the University is excellent." 

In proof of the estimation in which it is held by prominent 
Southern men, see the following extract from a letter by the late 
Hon. Z. B Vance, United States Senator from North Carolina: 

«•* * * I am well acquainted with Biddle University, and I 
think it better circumstanced to do good than any other institution 
of the kind in the south The whole people of the region are fully 
in accord with its objects " 

From Rev. Drury Lacy, D. D., late President of Davidson 
College, North Carolina: 

"I firmly believe that Biddle University is doing a greater work 
for missions, foreign and domestic, than any mission at home or 
abroad." 

From Dr. E Nye Hutchison: 

"It is my earnest prayer that some liberal Presbyterian may 
fully endow Biddle University, and make it not only useful to its 
generation at home, but a blessing to the world." 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

i. No one under twelve years of age will be admitted to the 
school. Applicants who are strangers to the faculty must bring a sat- 
isfactory certificate of good character, and steady, industrious habits. 
Every student by his enrollment contracts to obey the regulations 
of the University. 

2. Students are expected at all times to act with respect and 
courtesy towards their instructors and fellow-students, and observe 
cleanliness and neatness in person, clothing and room. 

3. All students except day scholars; are required to attend 
chapel exercises each morning, general prayer meeting Saturday 
evening, Sabbath School and evening services on the Sabbath, as 
well as their regular recitations. Day scholars are required to 
attend chapel exercises each morning except Saturday. 

4. In order to preserve health, cultivate manual skill, develop 
taste, and, at the same time, keep the buildings in order, and im- 
prove and beautify the grounds, all students except day scholars are 
required to work one hour each day. 

5. Students from abroad are required to board in the Home 
unless excused by the faculty; and when so excused shall be regard 
ed as day scholars, and shall pay $1.50 per term 

Board, including furnished room, light, fuel and washing of bed 
cloths, is $8 00 per calendar month, payment two months in ad- 
vance. Any student, who, without satisfactory arrangement, shall 
not pay within ten days from the first of the month, shall forfeit the 
privileges of the institution. 

6. Day pupils must pay their dues, $1.50 per term, at the begin- 
ning of each term, and while on the grounds be subject to all the 
rules of the institution. 

7. Punctuality and diligence in regard to all duties and exercises 
are required. 

8. During the time set apart for study, students will remain in 
their rooms or in such places as may be designated for study. 
Talking, loud studying, or visiting from room to room during study 
hours and boisterous rude conduct in any of the buildings at any 
time are prohibited. All students are expected to be in their 
rooms and quiet between 10 p, m., and 6 a. m. All lights out at 
10-30 p. m. 

9. Low, vulgar or profane language, the use of ardent spirits' 
wine or beer, tobacco in any form, keeping or handling of pistols' 
and all games of chance are prohibited. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



41 



10. Students are forbidden to mark or deface in any way 
the buildings or furniture, or to throw slops, waste water, paper or 
anything that would c-uise a nuisance from the windows or about 
the grounds. Any damage done bv wantonness or carelessness 
must be paid tor by the person doing the same. 

11. Students are forbidden to entertain other students, their 
friends or strangers in their rooms over night. Students having 
friends for whom they desire either meals or lodging will report 
to the Superintendent. 

12. The students are forbidden to hold any public meetings on 
the premises k>{ the University for any purpose whatever without 
special permission from the President. 

13 The students are forbidden to give entertainments of any 
character and invite guests without special permission. 

14 Students are allowed to attend church in Charlotte on Sab- 
bath afternoon; but no one will be permitted to leave the grounds 
at other times without special permission. 

15. A monitor shall be apo >inted for each floor or building 
who shall report any neglect of dutv, or disorder, 

16. Violation of the rules will subject the offender to discipline. 



TIME TABLE. 



6-00 A. M. — Rising Bell. 


12-50 p. 


M. — Dinner. 


6-45 ' — Warning Bell. 


1 45 ' 


' — Gong— 1st Rec. } Bell 3 


7-00 " — Breakfast, 


2-30 ' 


' — Gong — 2d Rec. j- Mins. 


8-25 " — Cadet In-pection. 


3-15 ' 


' — Gong — Close. J Before 


8-30 " — Chapel, Warning Bell. 


4-00 ' 


■ —Work Hour Bell. 


8-40 " —Chapel Bell. 


5-00 ' 


' —Cadet Drill. 


8-45 " — Gong— Doors Closed. 


6-00 ' 


' — Supper. 


Q-00 " — 1st Recitation. ] Bell 


7-~o ' 


' —Study Hours Bell. 


10-00 " — 2d Recitation. Thr^e 


9-45 ' 


' —Close Study Hours Bell. 


11-00 ' — 3d Recitation [- Minutes 


10-00 ' 


' —Night Bel*. 


12-00 M. — 4th Recitation. | Before. 






12-45 P. M.— Close. J 







STUDY HOURS. 



MONDAY . . From 7-00 to 9 45 P. M. 
TUESDAY . . From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M 
WEDNESDAY From 7-00 to 9 45 P. M 



THURSDAY From 700 to 9-45 P. M. 
FRIDAY . . From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 
SATURDAY From 9 00 to 12 A. M. 



MEETINGS. 



SUNDAY 8-30 A. M., Warn'gS.S 
SUNDAY 8-40 A. M., S, S B-ll. 
SUNDAY 8.45 A. M., Gong. 



Bell. 



SUNDAY 7-30 p. M„ Ch. Warn'g Bell. 
SUNDAY 7-56 P. M.. Church Bell. 
SUNDAY 8-00 P. M., Church Gong. 



TUESDAY 6-30 P. M., Students' Prayer Meeting. 
THURSDAY 6-30 P. M., Y. M. C. A. Meeting. 
FRIDAY 7 00 to 9-45 P. M., Societies. 



42 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



Each student on entering the University is required to sign 
the following: 

/ A. B., now entering Biddle University as a student, do 
solemnly promise to obey all the rules and regulations for the 
government of students, as long as I remain a member thereof 

{Signed) A. B 



LiniveFsifv vfjenend 



err 5 . 



1894. 

Friday, June 1 \ 7- 30 p m Preparatory closing exercises. Address 

by Rev. A. J. Tate. A. B., of Greensboro. 
Sunday, June 3. 3 p. m. Baccalaureate Sermon by Rev. D. J. 

Sanders, D. D. 
Monday, June 4, j-30 p m Junior Prize Contest. 
Tuesday \ June 5 ', 3 p. m Address before the Alumni by Bishop C 

C. Petty, D. D., Class of '78. 
Wednesday, June 6, 10 30 a m. Commencement Exercises. At 

3p.m, Annual Address by Rev. H. T. McClelland, D. D., 

of Pittsburg, Pa. 
Tuesday, Oct. 2, 3 p. m. Examination of applicants for admission 

begins, 
Wednesday, Oct. 3, First term begins. 
Friday, Dec 21, Winter Vacation begins 

1895. 

Thursday, Jan. 24, Day of Prayer for Colleges 
Thursday, Feb. 1, Second Term begins. 
Friday y March 29, Joint Exhibition of the Literary Societies. 
Wednesday, June 5, Commencement. 



u<ap|0=de,r)f<2,r)r)i(2tl /4<a<acr)<a<2r, 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 



Biddle University, Charlotte, N. C, is the outgrowth of what 
was at first and for a number of years, known as Biddle Memorial 
Institute. At the close of the war between the States, which 
resulted in the emancipation of the colored people of the South, a 
few consecrated christian missionaries— among them Rev. S. C. 
Alexander, now of Millerstown, Pa. and Rev. W. G. Miller — who 
were engaged in gathering the colored people into churches, 
appreciating the pressing demands for a school in which the future 
leaders of the people might be trained, and foreseeing in tome 
measure the possibilities of the future of such an institution, amid 
such favorable surroundings, set about devising such plans as would 
secure the desired results. 

The Presbytery of Catawba had been formed, and the 
movement for the School was formally inaugurated by the Presby- 
tery at a meeting in the old Charlotte Presbyterian Church, corner 
of D and 4th streets in that city, April 7th, 1867. A plan of the 
Institute was adopted, and Revs. S. C. Alexander and W. G. 
Miller were elected teachers in said Institution to be associated 
equally in the conduct and management of the same. Rev. W. 
G. Miller was sent as a commissioner to the General Assembly that 
yeai , He was authorized by the Presbytery, with the advice and 
consent of the General Assembly's Committee on Freedmen, to act 
as financial agent for the Institution during the Summer following. 
In the meantime the organization and conduct of the infant Insti- 
tution as well as the erection of a suitable building was placed in 
charge of Rev. Mr. Alexander, who was then on the ground with 
his family. These were thf» first steps toward the realization of the 
idea of an Institution for the purpose of training colored men in 
this region, which had been in contemplation for more than a year 
previous, but which had been held in abeyance by the want of funds, 



44 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Some months previous the matter had been brought to the 
notice of Mrs. Mary D. Biddle, an excellent christian lady of 
Philadelphia. Pa , who had noted an appeal on behalf of the work 
in one of the church papers, and who pledged $1400 for the cause. 
Grateful for this first and generous contribution, the colored people 
themselves, who had learned that her late husband had yielded his 
valuable life in the cause of the Union and human freedom, 
requested of Mrs. Bi> die the privilege of perpetuating his memory 
in connection with this school, which was granted; and accordingly 
it was named "The Biddle Memorial Institution," and was sub- 
sequently chartered by the Legislature of North Carolina under th^t 
designation. From that time forward Mrs Biddle has been an 
abiding and helpful friend of the School, watching its development 
and rejoicing in its growth and usefulness with all the solicitude of a 
devoted patroness. 

The first session commencing May 1, 1867 and continuing 
five months had 8 or 10 students. These consisted of discreet 
and pious young men (some of them not very young) of good 
ability and possessing a knowledge ol the simple elementary branches 
of an education. In the primary branches they were under the 
instruction of the teachers of the parochial school and under Prof. 
Alexander's instruction in the Bible and Catechism. They were 
also employed as catechists and assisted in that capacity in the care 
of the churches, six of which had now been organized in and in the 
region around Charlotte. 

The question of a location for the In-ti'ution was a very per- 
plexing one. The proposed location in the vicinity of the old 
church, in the city, was far from satisfactory. The >ite which the 
University now occupies was lying waste and was the property of 
Col. W. C. Myers, a wealthy citizen of Charlotte. When approached 
he thought he could not sell the 8 acres desired, but was willing to 
sell the entire tract, 130 acres for $3,000! That was far beyond the 
means at command and the offer had to be declined, and the plan 
to build on the undesirable lot in the city was proceeded with to 
this extent: When the first load of lumber was being removed to 
the spot the teams were met in the street by Col. Myers, who 
having learned the purpose, said, "Don't put up your building 
there, the location is not a suitable one. I will donate a site (8 acres) 
on the tract on the Beatty's Ford road." It was decided to accept 
it on the spot. The teams were turn d and driven to the ground 
on which Biddle now stands. Here the hand of Providence was 
conspiciously manifested as often before and since in behalf of the 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 45 

Institution. The noble and generous souled Col. Myers has lived 
to witness the splendid results for God and humanity of his timely 
act in behalf of a struggling and rising people 

The late United States Senator, Zebulon B. Vance, should also 
be mentioned as contributing $50 to the cause. 

In 1867 added to Mrs. Biddle' s gifts was that of $10 000 in 
several appropriations from the Freedmens Bureau, which completed 
the Institute building 54 x 50, two professors' houses, a student's 
d mitory, stabe, a fence around the grounds and sunk a well. All 
was complete and ready to be occupied in August, 1869, just 25 
years ago, when the work was fuHv organzed. 

In the spring of 1869 Rev. Mr. Miller removed to Statesvlle 
and his connection with the school became merely nominal until 
December of the same year when his relation thereto wholly ceased. 

UnHer Professor Alexander the school was opened in the new 
accommodat'ons, the latter part of September of the same year. 
He organized the School in two Departments — a preparatory in 
which pupils in primary studies were received from Charlotte and 
surrounding country, and a higher department in which those who 
were under training with a view to teaching and preaching were 
instructed 

In September 1869, R«-v. Wm Alexander, a brother of Rev. 
S. C. Alexander, now Dr. Alexander of the Theological Seminary, of 
San Rafael, California, was elected the first President of Biddle 
Institute but he declined, having received and accepted a call to the 
church of San Jose, Col Rev. S. Mattoon D D., was then 
elected, and he 'accepted the Presidency. He assumed the duties 
of his long and successful career in the Presidency of the Institution 
in February 1870 Rev. S. C. Alexander continued in the Insti- 
tution until May 1871, when he terminated his connection with 
Biddle Institute and the work among the colored people of the 
South. It has been seen that Rev. S. C Alexander bore a devoted 
and conspicuous part in laying deep and strong the foundations of 
Biddle University, and it will lend special interest to the approach- 
ing Qu-irto-Centenniai exercises that (D V ) he will be pres« nt 
and make an address. Refering to this in a recent letter, Rev. Mr. 
Alexander says: 'Five years of my life I gave to this work in its 
most critical and tryirg period, and especially to laying the 
foundation of your now noble University. They were trying years, 
full of self denying work and calling for constant patience and 
prayer; but I was wonderfully supported by divine grace, and 
never for a moment lost faith in its utmost success. I never felt 



46 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

seriously the pressure ol southern white opposition or contempt. 
My conviction of the essential righteousness of the work and of the 
Master's favor in it, rendered me proof against anything of that 
kind. I only deplored what seemed to hinder or retard the work, 
and nothing more than the apathy and want of liberality on the 
part of its friends North." 

Rev. S C. Logan, D. D., now of Scranton, Pa , was 
corresponding secretary of the Freed men's Committee of the 
Presbyterian Church during the years covering the infancy of the 
Institution, and in that capacity took a leading part in establishing 
the work. 

The burning of Dr. Mattoon's house in the fall of 1879 was not 
only a material loss, but resulted in a loss of the official records of 
the school. It seems, however, that from that period forward a 
persistent and successful effort was made to raise the standard of 
scholarship in the school, so that at present, as indicated in the an- 
nual catalogue (and what is put therein is being taught), the 
curriculum holds a reputable rank among those of similar institu- 
tions elsewhere. Under the eminently successful presidency of Dr. 
Mattoon, seconded, supported and aided in it all by that 'noblest 
woman of them all," Mrs. M L, Mattoon, three things were ac- 
complished, namely: The prejudices of the community against the 
school were largely overcome and opposition was changed to friend- 
ship Secondly, the policy adopted by his predecessors of develop- 
ing an evangelistic work with the growth of the school was broad- 
ened and deepened. Thirdly, the material resources of the institu- 
tion were greatly strengthened and the facilities enlarged 

In this connection, Rev. ' nomas Laurence, D. D , late a Pro- 
fessor of Hebrew and Greek in Biddle, now Principal of the 
Collegiate and Normal Institute at Asheville, N. C, should receive 
a just mede of praise for the conspicuous and successful part borne 
by him in securing the main building of the Universtty, which is 
the crowning glory of its material appointments. Under this ad- 
ministration should be mentioned also two other excellent men who 
left their impress upon Biddle and the young men brought under 
their influence. The one is Rev. J. H. Shedd, D. D , now a mis- 
sionary in Persia. He brought to the work a completness of 
scholarship and a Christian zeal, whose influence still lingers among 
us in a marked manner The other is Rev. Robert M Hall, A. 
M., now a pastor at Plymouth. 111. A scholar of fine attainments, 
a Christian of deep and fervent piety, Mr Hall is a man of childlike 
simplicity and withal a consistent and terrible opponent of wrong. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 47 

Prof George L. White impressed himself upon the life of Blddle 
by the reforms made in the Boarding Department of the school, 
which remains substantially as planned by him. 

A number of other teachers served long and well under Dr. 
Mattoon. 

In 1884 Rev W. A. Halliday was elected President to succeed 
Dr. Mnttoon. His administration was short and uneventful. 

Dr Halliday was succeeded by Rev. W. F. Johnson, D. D., 
whose administration is especially noted for the higher elevation 
still of the standard of scholarship in the school. 

The present administration came in June 1, 1891. 
The charter of the Institution was changed by the Legislature 
of North Carolina in 1883 arid it became ' 'Biddle University," with 
the property vested in a Board of Trustees, and a clause in said 
charter making it the perpetual heritage of the colored people in 
connection with the Presbyterian Church. 

As to the character, work and influence of the graduates of 
Biddle, it must suffice to refer the reader to the list of the grad- 
uates printed in these Quarto-Centennial Addenda, in connection 
with whom should be considered the hundreds who have attended 
upon the classes of the Institution without graduating. 

Five of the Alumni are members of the present Faculty of the 
Institution. 

And as to the present status and outlook of Biddle University 
the reader is referred to the Annual Catalogue in the preceeding 
pages. 



GRADUATES, 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Class of '72. 

NAME. WORK. POS I OFFICE. 

B F McDowell . . . Minister and Teacher . Greenville, S C 

Calvin McCurdy . . Honorably Retired . . Rome, Ga 

Eli Walker .... Minister Red Springs, N C 



Matthew Ijames 

M G Haskins . 

P G Lowrie . . . 
B F Russell . . . 
John G Murray . . 

J P Crawford, A M 
James A Rainey, . 

J C Simmons, A B 
R P Wyche, A M . 
A D Waugh, A M 

A C Johnson, A B 
D R Stokes, A B . 
Adam Frayer, A B 

W A Alexander AM 
M J Seabrook, B S 
T A Attles. A B . 
E H Garland, A B 
I F Miller .... 



Class of '74. 
Minister . . . 



. Shopton, N C 



Class of '76. 
. Minister and Teacher . Mebane, N C 

' Class of '77. 
. Minister and Teacher . Wadesboro, N C 

. Minister Black Stock, S C 

. Minister Mooresville, N C 

Class of '80 

. Minister Manning, S C 

. Minister Rock Hill, S C 

Class of '81. 

. Minister Darlington, S C 

. Minister Charlotte, N C 

. Minister Spartanburg, S C 

Class of '82. 

. Minister Columbia, S C 

. Teacher Texas 

. Minister Walterboro, S C 

Class of '83. 

Minister Plainfield, N J 

Minister Sumter, S C 

Deceased, '90 

Minister Texas 

Minister Winnsboro, S C 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 49 

Class of '84. 

NAME. WORK. POSTOFFICE. 

W E Partee, A M . Minister Jacksonville, Fla 

G S Leeper, AM.. Minister Gastonia, N C 

I D Davis, AM.. Minister . Winnsboro, S C 

Class of '85. 

D Brown, AM . . . Minister Wilmington, N C 

G W Wnite .... Minister Bamberg, S C 

Class of '87. 

A F Graham, BS . . Minister Biddleville, N C 

F B Perry, AM . Prof, and Missionary, Monrovia, Liberia, Africa 

S F Young, BS . . . Minister Shaw's Store, Va 

W H Shepperson . . Minister Chula, Va 

P G Drayton, AB . Professor and Minister . Biddle Universit y 

Class of '88. 

N Bell ....... Minister Huntersville, N C 

J W King Minister Shelby, N C 

B F Murray, BS . . Minister Cleveland, N C 

F L Brodie Minister Due West, S C 

A U Frierson .... Professor Biddle University 

B L Glenn Minister .... . . Newnan, Ga 

' Class of '8g. 

E W Carpenter AB . Minister Madison, Ga 

I E Hardy Minister Fountain Inn, S C 

S F Wentz, AB . . . Minister Statesville, N C 

A M Caldwell . . . Minister Greensboro, Ga 

Wm Hairston, BS . Minister Biddleville, N C 

Joseph Williams, AB Teacher Clinton, S C 

Class of '90. 
A J. Tate, AB . . . Minister Greensboro, N C 

Class of ,91. 

D D Davis Minister Greenwood, S C 

L J Melton Minister Wilson, N C 

J A Ramsuer, BS . . Minister Jonesboro, N C 

J O'Neal Knox, BS .Minister Charlotte, N C 

J M Caldwell .... Minister Pee Dee, N C 

S J Hargrave, AB . . Minister, AMSZ . . . Carbonton, N C 
S G Taylor Minister Biddleville, N C 



5C 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



NAME. 

I M Muldrow, AB 
DW Aiken . . 
S F Frazier . . 
P W Moone . . 
F L Toatley . . 



P W Russell. AB . 
S C Thompson, AB 

H L Peterson, AB 



Class of '92. 

WORK. POSTOFFICE. 

Minister and Teacher . Cheraw, S C 

Minister Winnsboro, S C 

Minister Riceboro, Ga 

Minister Wellford, S C 

Minister Lancaster, S C 

Class of '93. 

Minister Goldsboro, N C 

Minister Camden, S C 

Class of '94. 
C M Young, AB J A Tillman, AB 

N N Gregg, AB 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 



Class of '76. 

NAME. WORK. POSTOFFICE. 

D W Culp, AM, DD . Physician Palatka, Fla 

Clas of '77 

W I Lewis, AB . . . Editor Savannah, Ga 

J A Rattley, AM . . Pension Dep't .... Washington, D 

R P Wyche, AM . . Minister Charlotte. N C 

J P Crawford, AM . . Minister Manning, S C 

J A Rainey, AM . . Minister Rock Hill, S C 

Class of '78. 
C C Pettey, DD Bp . A M E Z Church . . . New Berne, N C 

A D Waugh, AB . . Minister Spartanburg, S C 

D R Stokes, AB . . Teacher Texas 

Class of '79 

W A Alexander, AM . Minister Plainfield. N J 

Adam Frayer, AB . Minister Waherboro, S C 

N W Harlee, AB . . Teacher Dallas, Texas 

J C Simmons. AB . . Minister Darlington, S C 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



51 



NAME. 



Class of '80. 

WORK. 



POSTOFFICE. 



T A Attles, AB . . 
E H Garland, AB . 
A C Johnson, AB . 
M J Seakrook, BS 



Deceased '90 

. Minister Texas 

. Minister Columbia, S C 

. Minister Sumter, S C 



Class of '81. 
I D Davis, AM . . . Minister .... Winnsboro, S C 

G S Leeper, AM . . Minister Gastonia, N C 

Wm E Partee, AM . Minister Jacksonville, Fla 

R H Richardson, AB Private Secretary . . . Washington, D C 

Class of '82. 
R M Alexander, AM Prin. Graded School . . Spartanburg, S C 

D Brown, AM . . . Minister Wilmingtou, N C 

E B Craig, AB . Deceased '83 

JFK Simpson, AM . Teacher, State Normal . Fayetteville, N C 



Geo E Davis, AM 
P G Hammett, BS 
F M Martin, AM 



A F Graham, BS . 
F B Perry, AM . 
H S Thompson, AB 
S F Young, BS . . 



A U Frierson, AM 
F P Laney, AB . 
J S Perry, AB . 
A Robertson, AB 
J B Sevelli, AB . 
B F Murray. BS 



E W Carpenter, AB 
A A Dryer, AB . . 
Wm Hairston, BS 
J Knox, BS . . . 
G J Melton .... 



Class of '83. 
Prof. Bid. Univ. . . . Charlotte, N C 
Prin. Parochial School . Spartanburg, S C 
Prin. State Normal . . Salisbury, N C 

Class of '84. 

Minister Biddleville, N C 

Prof. Liberia College . Liberia, Africa 

Teacher Dallas, Texas 

Minister Shaw's Store, Va 

Class of '85. 
Prof. Bid. Univ. .... Charlotte, N C 

Physician Washington, DC 

Teacher ........ Calahan, Fla 

Teacher Greenville, S C 

Teacher Texas 

Minister Cleveland, N C 

Class of '86, 
Minister Madison, Ga 

Deceased '86 

Minister . . . . . . . Biddleville, N C 

Minister . . . . . . . Charlotte, N C 

, . Deceased '90 



52 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



S F Wentz, AB 
J S Williams, AB 
S J Spencer, AB 
A N Ritchie, AB 



WORK. POS'IOHI'.K. 

Minister Statesville, N C 

Teacher Clinton. S C 

Pnn. Graded School . Texarkana, Tex 
Teacher Fla 



Class of '87. 

P H Brown, AB . . Mailing Clerk Columbia, S C 

A P Butler, BS . . Teacher Laurens, S C 

Lindsey Hunley, AB Teacher Mocksville, N C 



J DJMartin, AB . 
S B Pride, AB . 
S B Young, BS . 
J A Ramseur, BS 



S J Hargrave, AB 
J C Johnson, AB 
W T Reid, AB . 
I M Muldrow, AB 
A J Tate, AB . 



Class of '88 
. Prof. Bid. Univ . . . Charlotte, N C 

. Prof. Bid. Univ Charlotte, N C 

Deceased '89 

. Minister Jonesboro, N C 

Class of '89. 

. Minister Carbonton, N C 

Deceased '92 

. Mail Carrier Macon, Ga 

. Minister Cheraw, S C 

. Minister Greensboro, N C 



Class of 'go. 

J M Boger, AB Deceased '94 

PW Russell, AB . .Minister Goldsboro, NC 

S C Thompson, AB . Minister Camden, S C 

R W Williamson, AB Lawyer New Berne, N C 



Wm A Byrd, AB . 
H L Peterson, AB 
J A Tillman, AB . 
C M Young, AB . 
N N Gregg, AB . 
H B Rice, AB . . 
W A Walker, AB . 



H L McCrory, AB 
R L Douglass, AB 
D S Collier, AB . . 
J P Woolridge, AB 
E W Allen. AB . . 



Class of '91. 
Student Prin. The. Sem 
Theological Dep't . . . 
Theological Dep't . . 
Theological Dep't . . . 
Theological Dep't . . 

R. M. S 

Editor 

Class of '92. 
Theological Dep't 
Teacher .... 
Theological Dep't 
Theological Dep't . 
Theological Dep't 



Princeton, N J 
B.U.Charlotte, NC 
B.U.Charlotte, NC 
B.U.Charlotte, NC 
B.U Charlotte, NC 
Columbia, S C 
Chester, S C 

B. U. Charlotte, N C 
Winnsboro, S C 
Lincoln Univ , Pa 
Lincoln Univ., Pa 
B.U. Charlotte, NC 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



53 



NAME, 

J J Robinson, AB . 
W H Morrow, AB 
T H Ayers, AB . 
L B Ellerson, AB . 
G E Caesar, AB . . 
W P Donnell, AB . 
T R Veal, AB . . 
W B Middleton, AB 
J H Cooper, AB . 
P G Drayton, AB . 
J H Hutten, AB . 



J E Bowman 
A P Allison 
W D Hood 



Class of '93. 

WORK. 

Teacher 

Princeton Theo Sem. 
Princeton Theo. Sem. 
Princeton Theo. Sem. 
Princeton Theo, Sem. 
Theological Dep't . . 
Theological Dep't . . 
Theological Dep't . . 
Theological Dep't . . 
Prof Bid Univ. . . . 
Teacher, Haines Ins. , 

Class of '94. 
J A Rollins 
C H Shute 
A James 
H H Muldrow 



POSTOFFICE. 

Greenville, S C 
Princeton, N J 
Princeton, NJ 
Princeton, N J 
Princeton, N J 
B.U. Charlotte, NC 
B. U. Charlotte, NC 
B U. Charlotte, NC 
B.U Charlotte, NC 
Charlotte, N C 
Augusta, Ga 



Junius Gregg 
J M Vaughan 
S. M. Plair 



NORMAL AND PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



NAME. 



Class of '88. 



WORK. 



E W Allen Theological Dep't . Bid 

D S Collier Theological Dep't . . . 

J S Cooper Theological Dep't . Bid 

F S Frazier Teacher . . . . . 

J R Malloy Teacher ....... 

S S McCoy Teacher 

W H Mumford 

J M McGriff .... Teacher 

Wm F Ritchie . . Teacher 

Wm Thompson 

T L Toatley .... Minister 

J P Woolridge . . . Theological Dep't . . . 



POSTOFFICE. 

Univ, Charlotte. NC 
Lincoln Univ, Pa 
Univ, Charlotte, NC 
Fleming, Ga 
Laurinburg, N C 
Laurinburg, N C 
Deceased 
Winnsboro, S C 
Abbeville, S C 
Deceased 
Lancaster, S C 
Lincoln Univ, Pa 



Class of '88. 
T H Ayers ..... Theological Sem 

G E Caesar Theological Sem 

W P Donnell .... Theological Dep't 



. . Princeton, N J 
. . Princeton, NJ 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, NC 



54 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



NAME. 

L B Ellerson . 

I L Harris . , 

I H Hutten . 



H H Cardwell 
J H Clement 
R C Duncan 
J E Harris . 
J P Harrison 
A J Jefferson 
A P Johnson 
W L Metz . 
W M Pressley 
D E Speed . 
W H Stinson 
Guy Wadsworth 
J W Watkins 
F H Watkins 
J S Tyler . . 
C C Thompson 
J Q Moses . . 
A L Montgomery 
Wm M Malloy 
A L Martin . 



WORK. 



POSTOFFICE. 



Theological Sem . . . Princeton, N J 
College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N 
Prof Haines Institute . . Augusta, Ga 
Class of '91. 



College Dep't 
College Dep't 



College Dep't 
College Dep't 
College Dep't 
College Dep't 
College Dep't 
College Dep't 
College Dep't 
College Dep't 
College Dep't 
College Dep't 
College Dep't 



Printer 
College Dep't 



Theological Dep't 



Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ Charlotte, N C 
. . . Deceased 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ, Chnrlotte, N C 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. . . Charlotte, N C 
. . . Lincolnton, N C 
Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. . . Paw Creek, N C 
. . . Laurinburg, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, NC 



Class of 'go. 

S F Frazier ..... Minister Riceboro, Ga 

J E Graham . Concord, N C 

Junius Gregg .... College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
W D Hood . . . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Anderson James . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

Wm T Johnson Wilmington, N C 

J J Jordan . . . Rock Hill, S C 

M R McCain . . . . Teacher Walkup, N C 

C S McFadden . ., . Sardinia, S C 

S B McLamb . . . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

C S McMillan Laurinburg, N C 

H H Muldrow . . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ. Charlotte, N C 
S M Plair . . . . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

J M Steele . Rock Hill, S C. 

J W Still College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 55 

NAME. WORK. POSTOFFICE. 

C H Shute College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

J M Vaughan .... College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
C F Woolridge .............. Bradley's, S C 

Class of '89. 

T R Veal Theological Dep't . Bid Univ, Charlotte, NC 

F O Johnson .... Not Known Not Known 

H C Littles College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

Wm Means .... Teacher Winnsboro, S C 

Wm H Morrow . . . Theological Sem . . . Princeton, N J 

W B Middleton . . . Theological Dep't . Bid Univ, Charlotte, NC 

J A Rollins College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

C E Radford .... College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

J J Robinson .... Teacher Greenville, S C 

C L Sawyer Winnsboro, S C 

D C Stubbs Bennettsville, S C 

J J L Taylor ....US Army . . . 

F W Thompson Deceased 

E O Woodard . . . Medical Student .... Raleigh, N C 

Class of '90. 

John J Agurs .... Teacher Chester, S C 

A P Allison ■, . . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

B B Benjamin Sardinia, S C 

J E Bowman .... College Lept . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
J A Ellerbe ..... Cheraw, S C 

Class of '92. 

R J Boulware .... College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
W H Carroll .... College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
Wm M Flowers . . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

S J Grier College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

J M Henderson . . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
J A Pethel ..... College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

A W Scott College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

J H Sampson . . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

J W Westbrook . . Painter . Chester, S C 

J E Westberry . . . College Dep't . . Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 

E E Evans Cheraw. S C 

B B Funderburk . . Farmer Cheraw, S C 

T M Elrod Peidmont, S C, 



56 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



NAME. 

F J Anderson 
H W Bates 
W R Conners 
E W Ellis . 
L Fielder . 
J J Frazier . 
E W Gregg 
M } Jackson 
M H Lewis . 
G A Morrow 
J E Powe . 
F C Sadgwar, Jr 
W T Singleton 
J E Smith . . 
W H Spann . 
I D L Torrence 
S L Young . . 
Z Alexander 
J R Alsobrooks 
F M Boulware 
E C Byers 
L B Cooper 
J E Craig 
T H Davis 
Z A Dockery 
J E Tice 
T G Frierson 



Class of '93. 

WORK. 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 

College Dep't . 
H Harry 
W L Hudson 
J M Johnson 
L W Johnson 
J A Lightner 
I M Martin 
J L Massey 
W L McNair 
J C McNeill 
S I Moone 
J W Young 



FOSTOFFICE. 

. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Chanotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
. Bid Univ, Charlotte, N C 
J W Morrison 
T W Nance 
I H Russell 
J E Walker 
B M Ward 
J H Warren 
F Watson 
D F White 
R E Williams 
R A Wilson 



SUMMARY. 



School of Theology ................ 62 

School of Arts 96 

Normal and Preparatory School ... 147 

Total A . . 305 




,£2xa*c^ 



Q(yiy)^((y}y^^^)^(y^^. ^ ,j(^^. 4 



CATALOGUE 



OF* 



Biddle University 



% 



CHARLOTTE,^. 

1894-05 









■Ut. 



'% - 




Q 






| ^jffe|^l(fe |^l /Vr^x^yW /Vr^<^?V\ nfr%> ^ ^>W fjr%> j cS^M fjf^S> cg?w /7^<s^ /7^%>c§?U //^>c§^\) /7fe> 

TWENTY^SIXTH 

ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OK 

Biddle University, 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
1894-95. 



Under the Care of the Board of Missions for Freedmen of the 
Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A., Pittsburg, Pa. 



^2|^^ 



m 



j^oopd -ot- r 



J pusie,es 



Class whose term will expire June ist, 1895. 

Rev. D. S. Baker, Iincolnton, X. C. 

Rev. J. P r E. Kumler, I). I).. Pittsburg, Pa. 

Mr. Robert S. Davis, Pittsburg, Pa. 

J. C. McCombs, Esq., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Prof. J. C. Marquis, Chester, S. C. 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1896. 

Rev, G. C. Campbell, Burkeville, Va. 
REV. R. P. WYCHE, Charlotte. X. ('. 
Rev. W. R. Coles, Aiken, S. ( . 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1897. 

Rev. A. S. Billingsley, Statesville, X. ('. 
Rev. S. Loomis, A. M., Tryon City, X. C. 
Rev. H. N. Payne, D. D., Atlanta, Ga. 
Mr. C. S. Riggs, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Mr. A. Brady, Charlotte, N. C. 



icfcrs. 



Rev. A. S. Billingsley, President. 

Mr. A. Brady, Treasurer. 

Rev. R. P. Wyche, Secretary. 



I> (acuity. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 

Presidenl and Professor of Systematic and Ecclesiastical 

Theology. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D., Ph. D. 

Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis and German. 

Rev Yorke Jones, A. B., 
Professor of Homiletics, History, Rhetoric and English Literature 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 
Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Christian Evidence. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, D. D., 
Professor of Greek. 

Prof. George E. Davis, A. M., 
Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. W. F. Brooks, D. D., 
Professor and Principal of Preparatory School. 

J. D. Martin, A. B., 

Assistant Professor. 

P. G. Drayton, A. B., 
Assistant Professor. 

H. A. Hunt, A. B., 

Superintendent of the School of Industries. 

Rev. David Brown, A. M., 
Superintendent of Home, and College Pastor. 

A. U. Frierson, 
Librarian. 

George E. Davis, 
Secretary of Faculty. 



W'hd (l3cr)00l yrjeol 



001 2> 



ay- 



FACULTY. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, I). D., 
President and Professor of Systematic and Ecclesiastical Theology 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D., Ph. D., 
Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis. 

Rev. Yorke Jones, A. B., 
Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History and Bomiletics. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 

Professor of Christian Evidences and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, D. D., 

Assistant Professor of Greek Exegesis. 



( 


Senior Class. 






NAME. 


RFSIDENCE. 


COLLEGE. 


GKAD. 


Edward Wm. Allen A. B. 


. Winnsboro, S. C. 


. Biddle . . 


. "1)2 


Henry L. McCrorey, A. B. 


. Chester, S. C. . 


. Biddle . . 


. '92 


James M. McCay, . . . 


. Ridgeway, S. C. 


. Biddle 




HyderM. Stinson B. S. . 


. Land's Ford, " . 
— 4— 


. Biddle . . 


. '92 


Middle Class. 






NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


COLLEGE. 


GRAD. 


Jas. Henry Cooper, B. S. 


. Mayesville, S. C. 


. Biddle . . 


. '93 


AshasA. Crooke, A. B. . 


. Monroe, N. C. . 


. Livingstone. '93 


William P. Donnell A. B. 


. Monroe, N. C. . 


. Biddle 


'93 


Alexander L. Martin, . . 


Biddleville N. C. 


. Biddle 




Walter B. MiddUton, A.B. 


Charleston, S. C. 


. Biddle . . 


. '93 


John Cary Stanton, . . . 


. Sandifer, N. C. 


. Whiting 




Timothy R. Veal, B. S. . 


. Feasterville, S. C. 


. Biddle 


. '93 


Dennis Compentte Wilkes 


. Chester, S. C. . 


. Biddle 




P. Arthur White, A.B. . 


. Richmond, Ky, . 
—9— 


. Berea . , 


. '93 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 5 

Junior Class. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. COLLEGE. GRAD. 

Junius Gregg, A. B. . . Sumter, S. C. . . . Biddle ... '94 
Warren D. Hood, B. S. . . Charlotte . . '. . . Biddle ... '94 
J nines E. A. Jeffrey, .. . Br. Guiana, Demerara, S. A. 
Joseph A. Rollins, A. B. . Charleston, S. C. . Biddle ... '94 

Cliarles H. Shute, A. B. . Charlotte Biddle ... '94 

Daniel Shadd Monroe, N. C. . .Shaw 

Total Number in School of Theology 19. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



The numerals in brackets indicate the number of weekly recitations. 



Junior Year — First Term. 

Hebrew — Grammar and Manual [5] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [4] The Gospels. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Biblical History [2] 

Christian Evidences [1] 

Homiletics [2] 

Junior Year — Second Term. 

Hebrew — Grammar and Manual . . . [5] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [4] The Gospels. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Bible History . . [2] 

Systematic Theology . •■••[!] Hodge's Outlines. 
Homiletics [2] 



6 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Middle Year — First Term. 

Hebrew — Historical Books [2] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Church History [2] 

Theology [4] Hodge's Outlines. 

Christian Ethics [1] 

Homiletics [2] Broadus. 

Middle Year — Second Term. 

Hebrew — Historical Books [2] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church Government [2] 

Church History [2] 

Theology . . [4] Hodge's Outlines. 

Christian Ethics [1] 

HomileticS [2] Broadus. 

Senior Year — First Term. 

Hebrew — Prophecy and Poetry . . . [2] 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church History [2] 

Theology [2] Hodge's Outlines. 

Church Government [2] 

Pastoral Theology [4] 

Senior Year — Second Term. 

Hebrew — Prophecy and Poetry . . . [2] 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church History . . [2] 

Theology [2] Hodge's Outlines. 

Homiletics [2] 



OLD TESTAMENT---Professor Bissell. 

1. During 1892-3, and every second year, a course upon Old 
Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice a week 
for half the year. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 7 

'2. Junior Class. Hebrew begun. Recitations five times a 
week throughout the year. Text book : Harper's Elements of 
Hebrew, Harper's Introductory Hebrew Method and Manual. 
Special emphasis is laid upon the acquisition of a vocabulary. 
The inflections of the language and several hundred of the 
commonest words are memorized. There is daily drill in recip- 
rocal oral translation and in writing Hebrew. 

3. Middle Class. Reading from the Historical Books twice a 
week throughout the year. Textbook: Hebrew Bible, Harper's 
Hebrew Syntax, Driver's Hebrew Tenses. Special attention 
will be given to the Syntax, to enlarge the vocabulary and to 
rapid reading. For a part of the year the class will take English 
Bibles to the blackboards and, with these alone, write the 
Hebrew from memory. 

4. Senior Class. Reading at sight from the Historical Books. 
Exegesis of Hebrew Prophecy and Poetry, twice a week through- 
out the year. 

5. During 1893-4, and every second year, such members of 
the Middle and Senior classes as are qualified for it, may make 
a beginning in Comparative Semitic Grammar by reading com- 
paratively the first chapters of Genesis in Hebrew, Aramaic, 
Syriac and Arabic. 

NEW TESTAMENT— -Professor Bissell. 

1. During 1893-4, and every second year, a course upon New 
Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice a week 
for half the year. 

2. a. Junior Class will read the remaining three Gospels with 
reference to the Harmony, and, also, to the distinctive charac- 
ter of each of the four Gospels, four times a week throughout 
the year. 

b. Middle Class will read Ephesians with exegesis, twice a 
week through the year. The other epistles of the captivity — 
Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon — will be assigned for 
private reading. A summary of their contents will be consid- 
ered in the class room, and they will be required in the exam- 
ination. 

c. Senior Class will read Romans with exegesis, twice a week, 
through the year. The other epistles of the third Missionary 
Journey, I Corinthians, II Corinthians and Galatians, will be 



8 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

assigned Cor private reading. Their scope and contents will be 
discussed in the school room, and they will be required in the 

examination. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY — Dr. Sanders. 

In this Departmenl the purpose is to have each studenl read, 
during his course, some standard work on Systematic Theology, 
and in addition to this to read some authority on Theism. 

This course of reading will be made the subjeel of the mosl 
thorough examination and free discussion, and will be supple- 
mented by every available means winch are likely to encourage 
and stimulate the student in his search for truth, and in prep- 
arations lor its defence. 

Systematic Theology is begun in the second term of the Junior 
year and completed in the Senior year. The doctrines of The- 
ology are presented didactically, historically anil polemically. 
The order of topics pursued is: The nature, forms, and sources 
of Theology; the being of God, His nature and attributes; the 
Trinity; the Divinity of Christ; the Holy Spirit: the decrees 
of God; creation; providence; miracles: the origin, nature and 
primitive state of man: the covenant with Adam: the fall: sin: 
imputation; original sin; inability; the covenant of grace: the 
person of Christ; His offices; the nature, necessity, perfection 
and extent of the atonement; His kingdom; His humiliation 
and exaltation; vocation; regeneration: faith: justification; 
sanctitication ; the law of God; the sacraments: eschatology. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Homilctics. — Professor Jones. — The work of this Department 
is carried on throughout the Seminary Course. In the Junior 
and Middle years, a text book on the "Preparation and Delivery 
of Sermons" is read. This is supplemented by exercises in the 
analysis of Sermons, and preaching before the Professors and 
students of the Universiry weekly. 

In the Middle and Senior Classes much attention is given to 
the preparation and criticism of Sermon plans and extempore 
preaching. 

Christian Evidence. — Dr. Hargrave. — By means of Text hooks 
and discussions the student is aided in verifying the Biblical 
j .roofs of doctrine and Christian truth as represented in the 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 9 

symbols of the church, and he is thus trained to express with 
facility and clearness the revealed will of God. 

Pastoral Theology. — The treatment of this subject is confined 
to the third year of the course. It is designed that each student 
shall become thoroughly acquainted with the best method of 
applying the message of salvation to the hearts and lives of 
men. Lectures are given, accompanied by use of text book. 

The course includes the importance of ministerial piety prop- 
er habits of study, skill and ability in the various branches of 
church work, the pastor's relation and duty to the various 
courts of the church, and the various private and public duties 
pertaining to his office. 

Church Government. — Dr. Sanders. — Four lectures on the 
general subject are given to the Junior Class. 

In the Middle year the Form of Government with proof texts 
is taken up and pursued through one term, and a minute com- 
parison with other forms of church polity is made. 

In the Senior year, Dr. Hodge's work, "What is Presbyterian 
Law?," and the Book of Discipline are used as text books, ac- 
companied by lectures. 

BIBLICAL AND ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY---Prof. Jones. 

Since Sacred History is of vital importance as a part of a 
thorough Theological Education, the subject is pursued through 
the entire three years' course. 

Biblical History is studied by the Junior Class with the 
English version of the Old Testament as a text book, and 
Smith's Old Testament History as a guide, and is taught by 
lectures and constant reference to the typical and preparatory 
nature of the Old Testament. The connection between sacred 
and profane History is pointed out and attention is given to 
Archaeology, Geography and Chronology. 

Ecclesiastical History. — This subject is taken up by the Middle 
class and is taught by lectures and with text book, covering the 
period from Apostolic times to the Reformation — 16th Century. 

The Senior Class continues the subject from the Reformation 
to the present time, devoting the second term to the history of 
the Presbyterian church in the United States. 

During each year a carefully prepared thesis having for its 
subject some leading personage, epoch, or phase, etc., of sacred 
history, is required from each student. 



io liiDUi.K UNivKksrrv. 



INFORMATION 



ADMISSION. 

This School is open to young men of all denominations. 
Candidates for admission musl produce evidence thai they are 
members in good and regular standing in some evangelical 
church; that they possess competent talent; and thattheyhave 
been regularly graduated at some College or University, or in 
some way they have received an equivalent for the training of a 
College course. Applicants for admission to an advanced stand- 
ing must present a dismission from some other Theological 
Seminary, or be prepared for examination on the subjects which 
have been pursued by the class which they desire to enter. 

When a student who has been a member of any other Theo- 
logical School seeks admission into this, he musl produce cer- 
tificate of good standing and orderly dismission ere he can be 
received. 

EXCEPTIONAL CASES. 

In exceptional cases, promising youngmen who have not had 
the benefit of a full college course will be received and will be 
allowed to pursue an eclectic course. 

PERIOD OF STUDY. 

The regular course of study, as in the other Seminaries of the 

Church, covers a period of three full years. 

PRACTICAL WORK. 

The practical work of the Ministry is joined with study, as 
the theological students have opportunities of laboring as sup- 
plies in ,the neighboring churches during vacation and term time. 

With the facilities at hand special and successful efforts are 
made to aid students in obtaining vacation employment along 
the lines of their future work as teachers and preachers among 
the people. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. I I 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



Except in a few particulars the students of the School of The- 
ology are not subject to the rules and regulations which govern 
those of the other schools of the University. 



ROOMS. 

The rooms in Divinity Hall, so far as is necessary, are reserved 
for Theological Students. These rooms are furnished with a 
bedstead, mattress, pillows, bureau, washstand, chairs, looking- 
glass, etc. , and are heated by steam. 

EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition or room rent. g^" There is a 
charge of $8.00 per month for board, in connection with the 
Boarding Department where all students living on the grounds 
are required to board. This fee of $8.00 per month covers also 
expenses of fuel, light, and washing of towels and bed clothing. 

Books can be bought on the ground at a liberal discount. 

THE EXAMINATION. 

The next Annual Examination will be conducted during the 
last week in May. The examination will be oral and written. 
Each student is required to take this examination, and if by 
sickness or absence one fails to take it, he must submit to an 
examination with a corresponding class in a subsequent year. 



:r)0©l 0] /IpJs. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Rev. I). J. Sanders, I). I).. 
President. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, D. I).. 
Professor of Greek. 

REV. YORKE JONES, A. ]>. . 

Professor of English Literature Rhetoric and History. 

Rev. W. M. Eargrave, D. D., 
Professor of Mental and Moral Science and the Evidence 

of Christianity. 

Prof. Geo. E. Davis, A. M., 
Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics and Assistant in Latin. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D., 
Professor of Modern Languages. 



COURSES, DEGREES, AND TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

The School of Arts embraces two courses of study, the Clas- 
sical and the Scientific. Students completing the Classical 
Course satisfactorily receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts; 
those completing the Scientific Course, that of Bachelor of 
Science. Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are 
examined in the studies prescribed in our Preparatory Course, 
or their equivalent in case of those coming from other schools. 

For advanced standing the candidate, in addition to the pre- 
paratory studies, will be examined in those previously studied 
by the class he wishes to enter, or others equivalent to them. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. I 3 

COURSES OF STUDY. 



The numerals in brackets indicate the number of weekly recitations. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Freshman Year. 



Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek .... Xenophon's Anabasis, Books, I, II, III, IV. [4] 

" Grammar, Godwin [4] 

Latin Virgil, Greenough [4] 

" Allen and Greenough [4] 

History Myers [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric . [1] 

Sophomore Year — First Term. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworth [2] 

Greek Homer, Iliad Books I, II, III ... . [4] 

Latin Horace, Satires and Epistles [4] 

Natural Science . Physics, Gage [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [2] 

Sophomore Year — Second Term. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek Xenophon's Memorabilia . . ■ • . . [4] 

Latin Tacitus ' s Germania and Agricola .... [4] 

Natural Science . Physics, Gage; Botany, Wood. .... [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric . . [2] 



Junior Year — First Ter 



m. 



Mathematics . Plane Trigonometry and Ana'l Geometry . [3] 

Greek Plato, Apology and Crito [4] 

Natural Science . Astronomy, Young [4] 

Rhetoric .... Genung [4] 



14 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Junior Year — Second Term 

Mathematics . . Surveying [3] 

Greek New Testament, one of the Gospels I r 4 -, 

" iEschines vs. ( Jtesiphon ( 

Natural Science . Physical Geography, Maury [4] 

English Literature [2] 

Rudiments Psychol. Steele [2] 

Senior Year — First Term. 

Greek New Testament [2] 

Chemistry Williams [4] 

Political Economy . . . Laughlin [2] 

Logic Jevons, Hill [2] 

Mental Philosophy .... Haven, with Lectures. . .[2] 

English Literature . . . [1] 

Evidences op Christianity . Barrows [2] 

Senior Year — Second Term 

Greek ... . . New Testament [2] 

Zoology Steele . . [4] 

Civil Government . . Thorpe [2] 

Ethics Robinson [2] 

Mental Philosophy . Haven, with Lectures [2] 

Science and Religion . Frazer [3] 



scientific course. 

Freshman Year. 

Mathematics . . . Algebra and Geometry, Wentworth . . [4] 

Greek or Latin . . . [4] 

German [4] 

History ..... Myers [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [1] 

Sophomore Year— First Term. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworth [2] 

G reek or Latin [4] 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 1 5 

German [3] 

Natural Science . Physics, Gage [3] 

" Physical Geography, Appleton's . . . [4] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [2] 

Sophomore Year — Second Term. 

Mathematics .... Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

German [3] 

Natural Science . Physics, Gage; Botany, Wood . . . [3] 

Bible . . . [1] 

Rhetoric [2] 



Junior Year — First Term. 

Mathematics .... Trigonometry and Ana'l Geometry . [3] 

Civil Government [4] 

Natural Science . Astronomy, Young [4] 

Rhetoric Genung [4] 



Junior Year — Second Term. 

Mathematics . . . Surveying [3] 

Greek New Testament, one of the Gospels . . [4] 

Natural Science . . Physical Geography, Maury [4] 

English Literature [2 J 

Rudiment. Psychol. Steele [2] 



Senior Year — First Term. 

Greek . New Testament [2] 

Natural Science Chemistry, Williams .... [4] 

Political Economy .... Laughlin [2] 

Logic Jevons, Hill [2] 

Mental Philosophy .... Haven, with Lectures .... [2] 

English Literature [1] 

Evidences of Christianity . Barrows [2] 

Sacred History [2] 



1 6 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Senior Year — Second Term. 

Greek New Testamenl [2] 

Zoology Steele [4] 

Ciail Government . .Thorpe .[2] 

Ethics Robinson [2] 

Mental Philosophy . Haven, with Lectures [2] 

Science and Religion . Frazer [3] 

Sacred History ... [2] 

Throughout the College Course there is ;i weekly recitation in 
the Bible, either in English or Greek. 

Stenography, Typewriting and Book-keeping are taughl ae 
electives. 



NATURAL SCIENCE---Prof Davis. 

Outline. 

Physics — Five months 4 time- ;i week. 

Botany — Three months 

Physical Geography — Four months 

Astronomy — Four months 

Chemistry — Five months 

Zoology — Three months 

i. Physics. 

During the Sophomore year the following topics, with others, 
will be treated: Mathematical Physics, Molecular Physics. Hy- 
drostatics, Pneumatics, the Kinetic Theory of Gases. Acoustic.-: 
Electricity and Magnetism, the Correlation and Conservation of 
Energy. 

Gage's Elements of Physics is used. 

2. Chemistry. 

Chemistry will be studied during the first five months of the 
Senior year. The work embraces the general treatment of 
Cherriical Philosophy, Chemistry of the non-metals, the metals, 
organic Chemistry and Chemical Archaeology. 

The lectures on this subject will be illustrated by experi- 
ments and be followed by reviews and examinations during the 



BIDDT,E UNIVERSITY. I 7 

course. Apparatus and re-agents sufficient for laboratory works 
will be furnished the student at a small cost. 

Williams' Introduction to Chemical Science will be used in 
connection with lectures. 

3. Astronomy. 

The second half of the Junior year is devoted to the study of 
Astronomy : embracing the elementary principles of mathemat- 
ical and physical Astronomy, such as Parallax, Refraction, Lat- 
itude and Longitude, Precession, Nutation, Aberration, Theory 
of tides and lunar eclipses, and elements of a planet's orbit. 

Young's Elements of Astronomy is used. 

4. Botany. 

The subject of Botany is pursued during the last three months 
of the Sophomore year. The student is required to gather 
specimens of flowers and plants; to analyze and classify the 
same. An herbarium of thirty specimens is required. 

Wood's New Botanist and Florist is used. 

5. Zoology. 

The last three months of the Senior year will be devoted to 
Zoology. Typical forms will be used to illustrate the subjects 
as they may be obtained in the locality. 

Steele's Fourteen Weeks in Zoology is used as a text book. 

6, Physical Geography. 

This subject covers the first half of the Junior year. It 
will be treated mainly by lectures. Maury's Geography will be 
used as a text book; but the student will have daily access to 
such books as Maury's Geography of the Sea, Foye's Child and 
Nature, Guyot's Earth and Man, Goldthwaite' s Geographical 
Magazine, Ritter's Comparative Geography, and similar books 
for collateral reading. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE— Prof. Davis. 

Harkness's Latin Grammar will be the standard of reference 
throughout the course. 

Freshman Year: First and Second Terms — Virgil's iEneid, 
first four books. Second term, Juvenal's Satires. 



1 8 KIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Sophomore Year: First and Second Terms — Satires and Epis- 
tles of Horace. Special attention will be given to scanning t li<* 
metres of Horace. Lectures on Roman Life, art and customs 

will occupy part of the last term. 

GREEK---Prof. Frierson. 

The course of study as outlined is intended or designed to lay 
for the ordinary student a foundation for the successful prose- 
cution of the Greek language and literature. 

The Junior Class will read from the New Testament one of 
the Gospels. Recitation daily till completed. 

The Senior Class will read "The Acts of the Apostles", with 
attention to the growth of the Apostolic church. Recitation 
twice per week throughout the Bchool year. 

Examination required of each class. 

MODERN LANGUAGE. GERMAN---Prof. Bissell. 

The study of modern languages has been introduced, hut for 
the coming year only the German will be taught, in the Scien- 
tific course, pursued by both Sophomores and Juniors. 

MATHEMATICS — Prof. Pride. 

The required course in Mathematics comprises Plane and 
Solid Geometry, Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Plane Geometry. — The Freshmen begin with Plane Geometry 
(Wentworth's), in the study of which special attention is given 
to the exercises for original demonstration, and that a love for 
and interest in the science may be developed, a free discussion 
of the possibilities of each proposition is encouraged. 

Solid and Spherical Geometry. — This is the prescribed course 
for Sophomores, and in order that the students may have a 
proper notion for solid figures as graphically represented on plane 
surfaces, they are encouraged to make their own models for il- 
lustration. This is facilitated by the co-operation of the Indus- 
trial School. 

Trigonometry and Surveying. — The course for Juniors includes 
Trigonometry and Surveying with practical use of instruments. 
Special attention devoted to field work. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 1 9 

HISTORY— Prof. Jones. 

The study of General History is carried through the 
Freshman year with text book and by lectures. On 
this subject there will be three recitations a week. This subject 
receives that careful and exhaustive attention which its import- 
ance demands. 

PHILOSOPHY.— Dr. Hargrave. 

Psychology. — Rudimentary Psychology is taught during the 
second term of the Junior year. 

Mental Science. — Mental Science is taught through the Senior 
year by the use of text books and lectures. 

Moral Science. — Moral Science is studied through the second 
term of the Senior year, and the students are instructed in the 
principles of Theoretical and practical Ethics. 

Rational Philosophy, or Formal and Particular Logic. — Logic is 
studied so as to make the student familiar with Logical Termi- 
nology and forms, and with the laws of Discursive Thought. 

Civil Government. — Civil Government and the Constitution of 
the United States, and Political Economy, are studied in the 
Senior year, and each student is made acquainted with the gov- 
ernment of the people of the United States, and American citi- 
zenship. 

Evidences of Christianity, Science and Religion, and Theism. — 
Instruction in these subjects is given by means of text books 
and class room discussions during the first term of the Senior 
year. 

Seniors 

John Henry Clement Mocksville. 

John Emmanuel Harris Huntersville. 

JohnPride Harrison Rock Hill, S. C. 

Alonzo Jonathan Jefferson Mayesville, S. C. 

Archie Pleasant Johnson Guthrisville, S. C. 

Samson Bryant McLamb Goldsboro. 

William Lee Metz Clinton, S. C. 

Calvin Elias Radford . Doaksville, I. T. 

Dallas Edward Speed Henderson. 

William Henry Stinson Land's Ford, S. C. 

Joseph Wallace Stitt , , ♦ Matthews. 



20 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

GuyWadsworth Clinton, 8. C. 

Frederick Henry Watkins Brie Milk. 

—13— 

Juniors. 

Robert James Boulware Flint Hill, S, C. 

Hunter Holmes Caidwell Charlotte. 

William Henry Carroll Waukulla. 

William Meridith Flowers Cairo. 

SamuelJames Grier Winnsboro, S. C. 

James Monroe Henderson Winnsboro, 8. C. 

James Alexander Pethel . . . Charlotte. 

Armand Wendell Scott Wilmington. 

John Henry Sampson Pikeville. 

Henry Clay Littles Coddle Creek. 

James Washington Watkins Martinsville. Va. 

John Elliott Westberry Mechanics ville, S. C. 

—12— 

Sophomores. 

Floyd Joseph Anderson Jeters ville, Va. 

William Randall Conners Savannah, Ga. 

Walter Chresfield Coles Aiken, S. C. 

Thaddeus Jerome Coles Aiken, S. C. 

Charles Washington Ellis Due West, S. C. 

Ludie Fielder Wellford, S. C. 

Miles Junius Jackson Mayesville, S. C. 

Moses Henderson Lewis Greenleaf. 

George Alexander Morrow ....... Greensboro. 

Walter Thomas Singleton Cheraw, S. C. 

John Edgar Smith Charlotte. 

Issac D. L. Torrance Huntersville, 

—12— 

Freshmen. 

Frank Madison Boulware Flint Hill, S, C. 

Ernest Caswell Byers Davidson. 

Lucius Billinger Cooper Sardinia, S. C. 

Thomas Ebbort Craig Waxhaw. 

Thomas Henry Davis . Mayesville, S, C, 

Zander Adam Dockery „ Mangum, 






BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 2 1 

William Lafayette Fitzgerald Johnson City, Tenn. 

Taylor Jirardeau Frierson Sumter, S. C. 

Hugh Harry Winnsboro, S. C. 

William Lorenzo Hudssn , Stout's. 

John Moses Johnson Blackstocks, S. C. 

Lazarus William Johnson Winnsboro, S. C. 

Isaac McLaughlin Martin Mechanics ville, S. C. 

John Lee Massey Waxhaw. 

John Calvin McNeil Red Springs. 

Samuel Isaac Moone Powers, S. C. 

James William Morrison Matthews. 

William Randolph Muldrow Mayesville, S. C. 

Thomas William Nance Yorkville, S. C. 

James Wesley Owens Timmons ville, S. C. 

Moses Samuel Pharr Biddleville. 

James Eugene Powe Cheraw, S. C. 

Fred. Cottingham Sadgwar Wilmington. 

Isaac Henry Russell Monroe. 

John Elijah Tice Biddle University. 

John Eli Walker Charlotte. 

Beverley Major Ward Jenning's Ordinary, Va. 

Jeremiah Henry Warren Concord. 

Freeman Watson Nottoway C. H. , Va. 

David French White Richmond, Ky. 

Richard Edward Williams Goldsboro. 

James Wells Young Shelby. 

—32— 
Total in School of Arts 69 



INFORMATION, 



Students of the School of Arts are subject to all the Rules 
and Regulations for the government of the students of the Uni- 
versity, except that cadet duty and services in the School of 
Industries are optional. 

There are two regular examinations, one near the close of each 



22 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



of the two terms. The final grading of the Senior class is now- 
based upon in part and made up after the second examination, 
which will be given six weeks earlier each year than the general 
examinations, from which time the class will be excused from 
recitations. 

The examinations are oral and written and the requirements 
in connection therewith are absolute, except that a student may 
be conditioned for one term or not more than two studies, and 
the minimum general average for promotion to a higher class is 
65, and any one falling below 50 in any three studies is dropped 
from the School. 

Students are required to conform to the prescribed courses in 
every particular unless expressly excused by the Faculty. 

The discipline is impartial and firm, and all demerits arising 
from misconduct or infringement of the Rules and Regulations 
enter in and modify the grading, and when the number of de- 
merits reaches 25 in any one term the delinquent is subject to 
suspension. 



gpeparafopy czrrjd. r/oprrjtzrl ©^crjool 



FACULTY. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 
President. 

Rev. William F. Brooks, D. D. , 
Principal and Professor of English. 

Jas. D. Martin, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of Latin and English: 

P. G. Drayton, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of English. 



The Preparatory School aims to prepare the student thor- 
oughly for the studies of either course of the School of 
Arts. The Preparatory English course is a necessity, as 
the large majority of the students coming to the Institution 
have not had the opportunity to ground themselves in the com- 
mon English branches. Upon completing the studies of this 
course, the student is prepared to teach in the common schools 
of the State, as well as to enter the Freshman Class. A certifi- 
cate will be given to each student completing this course. 

All applicants for admission to this course must be at least 
twelve years of age, must furnish satisfactory testimonials of 
good moral character, and must be able to pass a satisfactory 
examination in the Fourth Reader, Primary Geography, and 
Wentworth's Grammar School Arithmetic through Addition 
and Subtraction of Common Fractions. 



24 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 
THIRD CLASS. 

Swinton's Fifth Reader, Tilden's Grammar School Geogra- 
phy, Grammar (Reed and Kellogg' s Graded Lessons), United 
States History (Montgomery's), Arithmetic to Stock- and Bonds, 
Spelling, Penmanship, Bible (Harper's Smith's Small History), 
History of the Negro Race in America, Ethics for Young People. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Latin First Latin Book, Tuell and Fowler. 

English Lessons in Language, Tarbell, 

Mathematics . . Arithmetic & Algebra, Wentworth. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Spelling . Once a week throughout the year. 

Dole's American Citizen. 

FIRST CLASS. 

First Term. 

Latin Caasar. 

Grammar, Allen &Greenough. 
Greek .... Beginner's Greek, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 
English. . . . Composition and Rhetoric, Genung's Outlines. 
Mathematics . Algebra, Wentworth' s Elements. 
Physiology . . Walker. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Drawing . . . Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

Second Term. 

Latin •*••.. Csesar. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 
Greek . . . Beignner's Greek, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 
Mathematics . Algebra. Wentworth. 

English .... Composition and Rhetoric, Genung's Outlines. 
Book Keeping . Scribner. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines, 

Spelling . . . Once a week throughout the year. 
Pedagogy . . . Essentials of Method, DeGarmo. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 25 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Swinton's Fifth Reader, Grammar (Reed and Kellogg' s 
Graded Lessons), United States History (Montgomery's), 
Wentworth's Arithmetic to Miscellaneous Examples at end, 
Spelling, Penmanship, Bible (Harper's Smith's Small History). 
Tilden's Grammar School Geography, Exercises in Declamation. 

SECOND CLASS. 

English Lessons in Language, Tarbell, 

Mathematics . . Arithmetic & Algebra, Wentworth. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Penmanship and Spelling . . Once a week throughout the year. 
Drawing .... Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Latin or Greek . First Latin Book, Tuell and Fowler. 
Beginners' Greek, White 
Grammar, Goodwin. 
Mathematics . . Algebra, Wentworth completed. 
English .... Rhetoric and Composition Genung's Outlines. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Natural Science Physiology, Walker. 
Spelling .... Once a week throughout the year 
Pedagogy . . . Essentials of Method, DeGarmo. 
Drawing. . . . Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

Exercises throughout both years in Composition, Decla- 
mation, and Vocal Music. 

Every student in the Preparatory and Normal School is 
required to take a trade in the School of Industries. 



First Class. 

Claudius Eugene Aiken Abbeville, S. Carolina. 

Charles Edward Alexander Lodo. 

Clayton Brooks Bailey Clinton. 

John Richard Baker Lincolnton. 

John Henry Byers Greensboro. 



26 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

* Timothy Andrew Chresfield .... Monroe. 

William Robert Coles, Jr Aiken. 

f Albert Sidney Cottingham . . . . Bennettsville, S. C. 

John Daniel Cowan Due West, 8. C. 

John Addie Croom Goldsboro. 

Alexander Hamilton Gaston . . . . Savannah, Georgia. 
Robert Beauregard Henderson . . . Huntersville. 

Thaddeus Gray Jenkins Enterprise, S. C. 

Charles Newton Jenkins Wellford, B. C. 

Samuel William James Camden, S. C. 

Charles Berkley Johnson Greenville, S. C. 

Richard Patterson Johnson .... Jetersville, Ya. 

Edgar Layton Timmonsville, S. C. 

James Eugene Mebanes Durham. 

John Hume Miller Grahamville, S. C. 

William Arthur Pethel Charlotte. 

Robert Alexander Pindle ...... Abbeville, S. ( '. 

Paul Tunstall Rison Danville, Ya. 

Sampson Leefield Russell Orangeburg, S. C. 

Joseph Joshua Sharp Monrovia, Lib., \Y. C. A 

John Augustus Smith Turnersburg. 

George Richard Spaulding Rosindale. 

Lloyd Spaulding Rosindale. 

George Francis Wilson MayesvUle, S. C. 

William Henry Wright Amelia C. H. , Ya. 

—30— 
* Deceased. f Irregular. 

Second Class. 

Wade Hampton Ancrum Cash's Depot, S. C. 

Warren Halsey Arch Quogue, L. I., N. Y. 

Jacob Baggett . . Lumberton. 

Charles Jeremiah Baker Grahamville, S. C. 

William Mark Barnwell Beauford, S. C. 

Luther Melancthon Brown ... Wilmington. 

William Benjamin Catus Mt. Airy. 

Richard James Christmas Oxford. 

Miller Calhoun Cooper Mayesville, S. C. 

Jacob Alexander Davis Pineville. 

Alvin Henry Dean Wellford, S. C. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 27 

Edward Elmoor Drinkwater Nottoway C. H., Va. 

Charles Henry Dunn Matthews. 

Samuel Lee Fulwood Mayesville, S. C. 

Charles Edward Graham Cowan's Ford. 

Herbert Bruce Grigg Biddle University. 

William Alfred Grigg Biddle University. 

John Welmon Gross Derita. 

John Calvin Hargrave Willmington. 

Walter Clarence Hargrave Lexington. 

Mack Hardy Spartanburg, S. C. 

John Moultrie Harleston Charleston, S. C. 

John David Howie Harrisburg. 

James Lincoln Hughes Mebanes. 

Oscar Joseph Jackson • . Charlotte. 

Walter Alexander Jenkins Steel Creek. 

Henry Marcus Johnson Harrisburg. 

Benjamin Franklin Lewis Lumberton. 

Cornelius Robert Means Charlotte. 

William Bloom Moone Powers, S. C. 

George Lewis McLeane Bunn's Level. 

Edward Washington Murray Rembert, S. C. 

John Adam Nicholson Rockingham. 

John Andrew Patterson Matthews. 

Joseph Samuel Patton Troy, S. C. 

Theodore Guy Rucker , Elberton, Ga. 

Reuben Lee Russell Walkup. 

William Lawrence Russell Winnsboro, S. C. 

Thomas Alfred Scott ...'... Wilmington. 

James Leonard Scott Danville, Va. 

Elliott Madison Simms Winnsboro, S. C. 

Henry Wilson Spaulding Rosindale. 

Alonzo Joseph Tyson Charlotte. 

Augustus Avery Thomas Sumter, S. C. 

* John Andrew Thompson Winnsboro, S. C. 

Jacob Thompson, Jr Charlotte. 

Waddy O'Hear Thompson Greenville, S. C. 

Hardy Mack Tony Mayesville, S. C. 

Robert Otter Tyler Biddleville, 

James Calvin Valentine Due West, S. C. 

* Suspended. 



28 HIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

f Joseph Benjamin Vaughan Crewe. \'a. 

Edgar Essex Watkins Erie Mills. 

Richard Reminger Watkins Reidsville. 

John Franklin Whitley Martindale. 

—54— 
f Excused indefinitely. 

Third Class. 

Frederick Ralph Arch Quogue, L. I., N. Y 

James Robert Barber Blackstock, S. C. 

John Weston Benton . . . Coburn'e Store. 

Robert Baxter Bittings Lexington. 

Lee Oscar Black Matthews. 

Ambus McDaniel Boat Concord. 

William Thomas Boulware . . . Charlotte. 

Nathaniel Laird Boger Concord. 

Edward Bonchet Brooks Biddle University. 

Adam Daniel Bruin Beaufort S. C. 

Rufus Kisslar Bristow . . . Rock Hill, S. ( '. 

Eugene George Bumpass . Durham, 

John Byers . Charlotte. 

Walter M. Caldwell Huntersville. 

David Wadsworth Cannon .... Concord. 

William Coakley Cantey Charlotte. 

John William Carter Mayesville, S. C. 

James Baxter Caldwell Harrisburg. 

David Thomas Cardwell Charlotte. 

Monroe M. Crawford Gastonia. 

John Craig Waxhaw. 

John Davis Charlotte. 

Leonidas Franklin Davis .... Wilmington. 
Chapel Hilliard Davis ... Waxhaw. 

Ailey Walter Davis Pinevillle. 

Charles Baxter Dixon Charlotte. 

William Dubose Shamrock. 

Crawford Mayes Fielder Wellford, S. C. 

Robert Foster Glenn Spring, S. C. 

Edward Gibson Concord. 

John Nelson Goins Wilmington. 

Ernest Claywood Grigg Biddle University. 



RIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 29 

Clarence Hagler Charlotte. 

James Seabrook Harris Harrisburg. 

Samuel Hemphill Matthews. 

Amziah Hendricks Charlotte. 

Elmer George Haskins Mebanes. 

James Ellis Hunter Charlotte. 

Thomas Walter Hughes . . Mebanes. 

William Henry Hunter Charlotte. 

John William Jamerson . . . . Martinsville, Va. 

Thomas Edward Jones . . . Charlotte. 

John Allen Johnson . . Guthriesville, S. C. 

James Rattray Scott Jeffrey . . . .Br. Guiana, Demerara, S. A. 

William Junior Darlington, S. C. 

Robert Kirkpatrick Matthews. 

Eugene Walter Lewis Charlotte. 

Washington David Leake .... Erie Mills. 
Elymas McDuff Lineberger . . . Gastonia. 
Eugene Richmond McCrorey . . . Chester, S. C. 

James W alter Massey Walkersville. 

Charles Richard McClure .... Biddleville. 
Wm. Alexander McCrorey . . . • Chester, S. C. 

Joseph Richard Pearson W r alterboro, S. C. 

Abram Bethel Penn Mount Airy. 

James Edward Phifer Charlotte. 

Leroy Pope Stanley Creek. 

Robert Monroe Pickens Statesville. 

W T alter Lewis Patterson .... Eastfield. 

Edward Michael Reid ...... Nimrod. 

James Thomas Richardson . . . Matthews. 
Samuel Alexander Richardson . . Matthews. 
Thomas Alexander Sanders . . . Spartanburg. S. C. 

Joseph Saville Charlotte. 

Benjamin Franklin Scott .... Wilmington. 

Wm. Mattox Simond Matthews. 

Ladson Patrick Simms Winnsboro, S. C. 

John Thomas Smith Charlotte, N. C. 

Arthur Stitt Biddleville. 

Moses Mack Spears Harrisburg. 

Brown Stewart Mint Hill. 

John Andrew Torrence Lodo. 



3° 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



Od ie Green Walker . . . 
Robert Alexander Walker 
Charles Alexander Ward 
William Walkup .... 
John Memphord Waddel 
James Jackson Watson 
Sidney Johnson Wentz 
Columbus White . . . 
Albert Coles Williams . 
James Edward Williams 
George Lee AVinn .... 
* Alvin Haley Williams 
Samuel Henry Withers 
James Edward Young . 
Thomas Young .... 
Wesley Young .... 



. Charlotte. 

. Roc* Hill, S. C. 

. Lincolnton. 

. Pineville. 

. Oak Forest. 

. Charlotte 

Coburn'fl Store. 
. Charlotte. 
. Columbia, S. C. 
. Bellfield, S. C. 

Wedgefieldj S. C. 
. Quogue, L. I., N. Y. 
. Steel Creek. 
. Biddleville. 
. Concord. 
. WinnsborOj S. C. 
—88.— 



* Suspended. 



cr)0(Z)l 0| lrjdusfpKzs. 



H. A. Hunt, Superintendent. 



All students in the Preparatory Course are required to take 
some trade, and report every day for work in the Industrial 
School. 

At present five trades are being taught — Carpentering, Print- 
ing, Brick laying, Plastering and Shoe making. Each student 
is allowed to have his choice of the trades being taught, but no 
changes will be allowed after the choice is once made. One- 
sixth of the time in recitation hours is devoted to industrial 
training. 

WOOD WORK— H. A. Hunt, Foreman. 

Carpentry and Joinery are taught in a room provided with 
twelve cabinet benches, each of which is fitted up with a set of 
carpenter's tools. 

Students are taught the use and care of these tools, the prin- 
ciples of wood-working — from drawings and models — and have 
also such practical instruction as can be had from improvements 
and repairs of the buildings and furniture of the University. 

Besides doing the necessary work for the school a limited 
amount of work is done for outside parties. Two Professors' 
houses have been built by the students, also a boiler house; and 
extensive repairs have been made on other buildings. 

THE PRINTING OFFICE.--- William E. Hill, Foreman. 

This office is equipped as any regular, first class printing es- 
tablishment would be. Besides the ordinary office furniture it 
has three first class printing presses. 

In this office the Africo American Presbyterian and the Biddle 
University Record are set up and printed, and job work is done, 
thus giving the students actual printing office instruction and 



32 



BIDDLE UNIYERSITV. 



practice, 1 >< » 1 1 1 in type-setting and press-work. The office is 
amply equipped for doing excellent work, and the instruction is 

thorough and practical. 

THE SHOE SHOP. 

The shoe shop is fitted up with twelve shoemakers' benches, 
each of which is provided with a set of tools. Student- are 
taught the use and care of these tools, and such work as is done 
in a regular shoe shop — sewing, pegging, nailing, cementing, 
patching, half-soling, fitting, lasting and putting together new 
work. 

By doing all the work for the students and professors ample 
opportunity is given for making this branch of work thoroughly 
practical. 

MASONRY AND PLASTERING. 

These two trades have heen introduced and instruction in 
them is being given daily with very satisfactory results. These 
branches are putting a goodly number in possession of skill 
that will command work and good pay. 

It is proposed to further enlarge this department by adding 
Tailoring and Blacksmithing, also to organize a branch of agri- 
culture. 



No of Students in Carpentrry 41 

Printing . . 50 

Shoemaking 29 

Brickwork 23 

Plastering 9 

Drawing 25 



Total 



177 



SUMMARY. 



The School of Theology. 

Senior Class . • 4 

Middle Class . . . . - .9 

Junior Class 6 — 19 

The School of Arts. 

Senior Class . ....,„.:. 13 

Junior Class 12 

Sophomore Class 12 

Freshman Class 32 — 69 

The Preparatory and Normal School. 

First Class 30 

Second Class 54 

Third Class 88—172 

Total Enrollment . 260 

The School of Industries. 
In the Five Trades 177 

Total 437 

Counted Twice 177 

Total Enrollment 260 



\T)e> rlon^e kieperpfrr/er)!, 



Rev. David Brown, A. M., Superintendent. 



This department includes the orderly keeping of the grounds, 
the supervision of the dormitories and the public buildings, and 
all that pertains to the immediate management of the students 
as to board and home life. 

The Superintendent and his family live among the students 
and give to them such care and attention as they would receive 
in a well organized christian home. 

Except the day students, all are required to live in this de- 
partment. 

The cost of living is eight dollars ($8.00) per month, paya- 
ble two months in advance, which includes boarding, furnished 
rooms, light, fuel and washing, except wearing apparel. This 
can be had at one dollar per month. 

Boarders are not received for less than one month, and no de- 
duction can be made for absence unless ordered by the Faculty. 



(§Ier)ep0:l li^toprr^fior). 



The School Year consists of one session of two terms, com- 
mencing on the first Wednesday of October, and closing on the 
first Wednesday of June. Students wishing to enter should 
make early application. The best interests of the Institution 
and of the student require that he report himself for duty 
promptly at the opening of each term. 

TUITION. 

There is no charge for tuition, except in the case of local 
students, who are charged S3 per session. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are four flourishing literary societies — the Mattoon, 
the Clariosophic, the Johnson and the Douglass. The exercises 
consist of composition, discussion and debate, and there is a 
Moot Court connected with them. These societies are governed 
by laws enacted by themselves, and their officers are also elected 
by themselves. The students are required each to become a 
member of one of these societies and to attend upon the exer- 
cises. The whole is under the supervision of the Faculty. 

THE LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

Two large airy rooms on the first floor of the main building 
have been set apart as Library and Reading Room. 

The former contains about 8,000 volumes of commentaries 
and religious literature, and also a variety of the works of stan- 
dard authors. About '400 volumes and 100 pamphlets have 
been added during the year. 

The latter is well supplied with many of the best religious 
and secular weekly and daily papers. 

The students have frequent access to Library and Reading 
Room under special regulations. 



36 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

COLLEGE Y. M. C. A. 

A college branch of* the Y. M. C. A. is in succc<;ssful"o jura- 
tion, with a membership of over 100. It is earnestly desired 
that all the students, identify themielyes with this noble work. 

PECUNIARY AID. 

Candidates for the ministry and young men of promise will 
receive such aid as their necessities and the resources at com- 
mand will allow. Friends in Scotland have established a fund 
of over $6,000, the interest of which is to he used to aid young 
men preparing for mission work in Africa. 

LOCATION AND DESIGN IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF 
THE INSTITUTION. 

The University is located at Charlotte, North Carolina, and is 
named in memory of the late Henry J. Biddle, of Philadelphia, 
whose widow, Mrs. Mary D. Biddle, has been one of its 
most liberal supporters. It is chartered by the Legislature of 
the State and is under the auspices of the Presbyterian Chinch 
in the U. S. A. 

. The object of the Institution is the education of colored teach- 
ers and preachers, and leaders for the race in other walks of life. 

It stands at the terminus of seven railroads, in the midst of a 
dense and comparatively intelligent colored population, and 
occupies a site of sixty acres in the suburbs of the city. 

It is situated in the heart of the South Atlantic region, which 
contains the two Synods of Atlantic and Catawba, having 290 
colored churches, 180 ministers, scores of young men in 
preparation for the ministry, with a large number of schools 
and academies under their care. These schools and churches 
must be furnished with intelligent Christian teachers and 
preachers, who must be largely educated on the field, and in 
contact with the people among whom they are to labor. Such 
a training is given here at less expense than it could be else- 
where; the student has the best opportunities for a liberal edu- 
cation together with the refining influence of a christian home, 
and he is kept at the same time in contact and sympathy with 
the people. 



\A/<2rr)fs 0| frje Irjsfifufior), 



1st. In the language of a Secretary of the Freedmen's 
Board, "Permanent Endowment Funds for the adequate support 
of the Professors is an imperative necessity." Five thousand 
dollars ($5,000) have been secured for the President's chair. 

2d. Scholarships: The establishment of which shall yield 
$100 each per annum, to enable needy and promising students 
in the higher departments to pursue their studies, continuously, 
through the college year; and in addition to this a few hundred 
dollars annually, to be placed in the hands of the Faculty, to 
be used at its discretion, in aiding needy and worthy students, 
is a great desideratum. 

3d. Donations of Clothing, for distribution among needy 
students, are earnestly solicited. 

4th. Useful books for the Library are much needed, works 
of reference, biography, history and science. A Library Fund 
is much needed, that purchases may be made from time to time 
of new and useful books. 

oth. Three thousand five hundred dollars to aid in enlarging 
and improving the School of Industries. 



£ 



0r)ciusi0r), 



No institution in the care of the Presbyterian Church has a 
wider field or greater opportunities. Its students arc gathered 
from all the South Atlantic States, and are scattered in their 
school and church work through all this vast region, and as far 
west as Texas. 

The Institution is consecrated to the glory of God and the 
welfare of a needy race. It is the only institution of its kind 
maintained by our Presbyterian Church in the South; and it 
certainly is one of the most important agencies in the hands of 
the Church for the accomplishment of good among eight millions 
of Afro-Americans. It commends itself to the prayers and gifts 
of all good men. 

The importance in the eyes of the Church, of the interests 
which Biddle University represents, is forcibly put in the lan- 
guage of a recent circular addressed to churches on its behalf by 
the Board of Missions for Freedmen : — 

, "What is done," say they, "for Biddle University, will, in a 
great measure, determine the success of our whole work among 
the Freedmen." 

"Indifference to the Biddle University is indifference to our 
whole work among the Freedmen. If liberally supported, no 
missionary undertaking will return speedier and more abundant 
fruit. Where are the men and women who will build up this 
Institution for the glory of God and the good of a needy race?' ' 

The Presbyterian Journal says: 

' 'Aiming to do a thorough work of education, there can be no 
question that it (Biddle University) is already doing a great 
work with the promise of still greater results hereafter. ' ' 

Rev. E. P. Cowan, D. D., Corresponding Secretary of the 
Board of Missions for Freedmen, says : 

' 'The best argument in favor of Biddle University as at present 
organized, is the good condition in which it now is, and the 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 39 

good work that is now being done. This can be seen by any 
one who will take the time and trouble to visit the place and 
examine for himself. 

"The order and decorum of the students is remarkable. The 
rules are stringent and obeyed. The buildings are well kept. 

"The Industrial Department is better organized and more 
efficient than it ever was before in the history of the Institution. 
Professor Hunt, a graduate of Atlanta University, is a practical 
carpenter. 

"Look into the shoe shop and you find a dozen young men 
(the room will hold no more) who an hour before were reading 
Greek and Latin; now they are sitting on cobbler's benches and 
are driving wooden pegs. In the next room a dozen or more 
are setting type, while two others are turning a large printing 
press, and a third man is 'feeding' the machine. 

"I visited every class-room in the institution, and found the 
instructor able to instruct; the learner able to learn. I de- 
voutly wish every friend of the work could visit the school. If 
this were possible, the University would have all the money it 
needs. Its professors are workmen that need not be ashamed. 
Their work suffers most from not being known, or clearly un- 
derstood. The institution is now running up to its utmost ca- 
pacity as regards numbers. 

"If the University only had the necessary accommodations 
and scholarships, the roll would easily run up to -500. Over 
thirty good applications for admission this year were declined 
for lack of funds. 

' 'We have come to the point where the Presbyterian Church, 
in its work among the freedmen, must decide whether it is going 
to have a large, strong, first-class University or not. Here is 
our opportunity. It is a grand one. If we seize it future 
generations will say, How wise! If we neglect it, they w T ill say, 
How foolish!" 

In the May No., '94, of the Church at Home and Abroad, Rev. 
Edward B. Hodge, D. D. , Corresponding Secretary of the 
Board of Education of the Presbyterian Church, says: "A recent 
visit to Charlotte, N. C. , enabled the Secretary to make some- 
thing of an inspection of the working of Biddle University. 
The situation of the institution is most delightful, commanding 
a wide view of the surrounding country. It is sufficiently far 
from town for the purpose of academic seclusion, and yet near 



40 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

enough for all purposes of convenience. President Banders 

presides over the institution with ability and skill to a degree 
that commends him to the favorable comments of such inteli- 
gent observers as the pastors of the Presbyterian Churches in 
Charlotte. It is very gratifying to find with what interest they 
are regarding our work among the colored people. One of them 
recently personally visited Kiddle University and made a most 
acceptable address to the students. There is great need for 
additional room for students. The number is far larger than 
can be properly accommodated. It is delightful to find what 
an eagerness for learning the students display, and, in many 
cases, a very decided aptitude. The order and discipline of 
the University is excellent. ' ' 

In proof of the estimation in whieh it is held by prominent 
Southern men, see the following extract from a letter by the late 
Hon. Z. B. Vance, United Statee Senator from North Carolina: 

"# * * I am well acquainted with Kiddle University, and I 
think it better circumstanced to do good than any other insti- 
tution of the kind in the South. The whole people of the 
region are fully in accord with its objects.*' 

From Rev. Drury Lacy, D. D., late President of Davidson 
College, North Carolina: 

"I firmly believe that Biddle University is doing a greater 
work for missions, foreign and domestic, than any mission at 
home or abroad. ' ' 

From Dr. E. Nye Hutchison: 

"It is my earnest prayer that some liberal Presbyterian may 
fully endow Biddle University, and make it not only useful to 
its generation at home, but a blessing to the world. ' ' 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



1. No one under twelve years of age will be admitted to the 
school. Applicants who are strangers to the faculty must bring 
a satisfactory certificate of good character, and steady industri- 
ous habits. Every student, by his enrollment, contracts to 
obey the regulations of the University. 

2. Students are expected at all times to act with respect and 
courtesy towards their instructors and fellow students, and ob- 
serve cleanliness and neatness in person, clothing and room. 

3. All students, except day scholars, are required to attend 
chapel exercises each morning except Saturday. 

4. In order to preserve health, cultivate manual skill, de- 
velop taste, and, at the same time keep the buildings in order, 
and improve and beautify the grounds, all students except day 
scholars are expected to work one hour each day. 

5. Students from abroad are required to board in the Home 
unless excused by the faculty; and when so excused shall be 
regarded as day scholars and shall pay $1.50 per term. Board, 
including furnished room, light, fuel and washing of bed 
clothes, is $8.00 per calendar month — payment two months in 
advance. Any student, who, without satisfactory arrangement, 
shall not pay within ten days from the first of the month, shall 
forfeit the privileges of the institution. 

6. Day pupils must pay their dues, $1.50 per term, at the 
beginning of each term, and while on the grounds be subject to 
all the rules of the institution. 

7. Punctuality and diligence in regard to all duties and ex- 
ercises are required. 

8. During the time set apart for study, students will remain 
in their rooms or in such places as may be designated for study. 
Talking, loud studying, or visiting from room to room during 
study hours, and boisterous rude conduct in any of the build- 
ings at any time are prohibited. All students are expected to 
be in their rooms and quiet between 10 p. m. and 6 a. m. All 
lights out at 10-30 p. m. 

9. Low, vulgar or profane language, the use of ardent spirits, 
wine or beer, tobacco in any form, keeping or handling of pis- 
tols, and all games of chance are prohibited. 



42 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



10. Students are forbidden to murk or deface in any way the 
buildings or furniture, or to throw slops, waste water, paper, or 
anything thai would cause a nuisance, from the window- or 
about the grounds. Any damage done by wantonness or care- 
lessness must be paid for by tin: person doing the same. 

11. Students are forbidden to entertain other students, their 
friends, or strangers in their rooms overnight. Students having 
friends for whom they desire either meals or Lodging will report 
to the Superintendent. 

12. The students arc forbidden to hold any public meetings 
on the premises of the University for any purpose whatever 
without special permission from the President. 

13. The students are forbidden to give entertainments of any 
character and invite guests without special permission. 

14. Students are allowed to attend church in Charlotte OB 
Sabbath afternoon; hut no one will be permitted to leave the 
grounds at other times without special permission. 

15. A monitor shall he appointed for each floor or building 
who shall report any neglect or disorder. 

1*6. Violation of the rules will subject the offender to disci- 
pline. - 





TIME TABLE. 




6-oo 


A M. — Rising Bell. 


12-50 P. M 


— Dinner. 


6-45 


" — Warning Bell. 


i-45 " 


—Gong — ist Rec ] Bell 3 


7-00 


— Breakfast. 


2-30 


— Gong — 2d Rec > Mins. 


8-25 


" — Cadet insDection. 


3- r 5 " 


— Gong — Close. J Before 


8-30 


" — Chapel, Warning BeU. 


4 00 


—Work Hour Bell 


8-40 


" —Chapel Bell. 


500 " 


— Cadet Drill. 


8-45 


" — Gong— Doors Closed. 


6-00 


— Supper. 


9-00 


" — ist Recitation. ^ R ,, 

" — 2d Recitation, ~, 

j r» • 1 hree 
— 3d Rccitaiion. /.,. 

M. - 4 th Recitation. ^ m f utes 

P. M.-Close. J Refore - 


7-00 


—Study Hours Bell. 


10-00 


9-45 


—Close Study Hours Beli. 


11-00 


10-00 


—Night Bell. 


12-00 
12-45 


1030 


—Lights Out Bell. 



STUDY HOURS. 



MONDAY . . From 7 00 to 9-45 p. M. 
TUESDAY . . From 7-00 to 9-45 p. M. 
WEDNESDAY From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 



THURSDAY From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 
FRIDAY . . From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 
SATURDAY From 9-00:012 P.M. 



MEETINGS. 



SUNDAY 8-30 A. M., Warn'g S. S. Bell. 

SUNDAY 8-40 A. M., S. S. Bell. 

SUNDAY 8-45 A.M.. Gong. 

TUESDAY 6-30 P. M., 
THURSDAY 6 30 P. M. 



FRIDAY 7-00 to 9-45 P. M., Societies. 



SUNDAY 7-30 P. M.. Ch. Warng Bell, 
SUNDAY 7-50 P. M., Church Bell. 
SUNDAY 8-00 P. M., Church Gong. 
Student's Prayer Meeting. 
Y. M C. A. Meeting. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 43 



Each student on entering the University is required to sign 
the following: 

i", A. B., now entering Biddle University as a student, do solemnly 
'promise to obey all the rules and regulations for the government of 
student*, as long as I remain a member thereof 

(Signed) A. B. 



Lirjivepsify vfjeclerjelecp. 



1895. 

Friday, May 31, 7-30 p. m. Preparatory closing exercises. 

Sunday, June 2, 3 p. m. Baccalaureate Sermon by Rev. D. J. 
Sanders, D. D. 

Monday, June 3, 7-30 p. m. Junior Prize Contest. 

Tuesday, June If., 7-30 p. m. Address before the Alumni by Rev. 
S. F. Wentz, Class of '86. 

Wednesday, June 5, 10-30 a. m. Commencement Exercises. At 
3 p. m., Annual Address. 

Tuesday, Oct. 1, 3 p. m. Examination of applicants for admis- 
sion begins. 

Wednesday, Oct. 2. First Term begins. 

Friday, Dec. 21p. Winter Vacation begins. 

i8g6. 

Ihursday, Jan. 30. Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

Saturday Feb. 1. Second Term begins. 

Friday, March 27. Joint Exhibition of the Literary Societies. 

Wednesday, June 3. Commencement. 



c 

ft 3 H- 



TWENTY-SEVENTH 



Annual Catalogue 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY, 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



1895-96. 



Under the Care of the Board of Missions for 

Freedmen of the Presbyterian Church 

in the U. S. A., Pittsburg, Pa. 



ffioarfc ot trustees. 



Class whose term will expire June ist, 1896. 

Rev. (r. 0. Campbell, Burkeville, Va. 
Rev. R. P. Wyche, I). I)., Charlotte, N. C. 
Rev. W. R. Coles, Aiken, S. C. 
L. P. Beeby, Esq., Statesville, N. C. 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1897. 

Rev. A. S. Billlktgsley, Statesville, N. C. 

Rev. S. Loomis, A. M., Tryon City, N. C. 
Rev. H. N. Payne, I). D., Atlanta, (iu. 
Mh. C. S. Riggs, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Mr. A. Brady, Charlotte, N. 0. 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1898. 

Rev. D. S. Baker, Lincolnton, X. C. 

Rev. J. P. E. Kumler, D. D., Pittsburg, Pa.. 

Mr. Robert S. Davis, Pittsburg, Pa. 

J. C. McCombs, Esq., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Proe. J. C. Marquis, Chester, S. C. 



©fftcers- 



Rev. W. R. Coles, President. 
Mr. A. Brady, Treasurer. 
Rev. R. P. Wyche, Secretary. 



faculty. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 

President and Professor of Systematic and Ecclesiastical 

Theology. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D., Ph. D., 

Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis and German. 

Rev. Yorke Jones, D. D., 

Professor of Homiletics, History, Rhetoric and English 

Literature. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 
Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Christian Evidences. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, D. D., 
Professor of Greek. 

Prof. George E. Davis, A. M., 
Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. 3VL, 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. W. F. Brooks, D. D., 
Professor and Principal of Preparatory School. 

J. D. Martin, A. B., 
Assistant Professor. 

Rev. P. G. Drayton, A. B., 
Assistant Professor. 

Rev. H. L. McCrory, A. B., 
Tutor. 

H. A. Hunt, A. B., 

Superintendent of the School of Industries. 

Rev. David Brown, A. M., 

Superintendent of Home, and College Pastor. 

A. U. Frierson, 

Librarian. 

George E. Davis, 
Secretary of Faculty. 






ZTbe Scboolot XTbeoloGK?. 



FACULTY. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 

President and Professor of Systematic and Ecclesiastic 

Theology. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D., Ph. D. 
Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis. 

Rev. Yorke Jones, D. D., 
Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History and Homiletics. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D. 
Professor of Christian Evidences and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, D. D., 
Assistant Professor of Greek Exegesis. 



Senior Class. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. COLLEGE. GRAD. 

William P. Donnel, A. B Greensboro, N. C.Biddle '93 

Walter B. Middleton, A. B Charleston, S. Biddle '93 

Timothy R. Veal, B. 8 Feasterville, S. C.Biddle '93 

Dennis Compentte Wilkes Chester, S. C Biddle 

P. Arthur White, A. B Richmond, Ky Berea '93 

— 5. — 

Middle Class. 

Jas. H. Cooper, B. S., Mayesville, S. C... Biddle '94 

Junius Gregg, A. B Sumter, S. C Biddle '94 

James E. A. Jeffrey Br. Guiana Demerara, S. A. 

Joseph A. Rollins, A. B Charleston, S. C... Biddle '94 

Charles H. Shute, A. B Charlotte Biddle '94 

I hiniel Shadd Monroe, N. C Shaw 

—6.— 



BIDDER UNIVERSITY. 5 

Junior Class. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. COLLEGE. CRAD. 

Albert S. Cottingham Bennettsville, S. C.Biddle 

John II. C lenient Mocksville Biddle 

Randolph Davis Biddleville Bennett 

Alonzo J. Jefferson Mayesville, S. C... .Biddle '95 

Archie P. Johnson Gnthriesville, S. C.Biddle '95 

Allen Lewis Biddleville Biddle 

Samson B. M'Lamb Goldsboro Biddle '95 

William L. Metz Clinton, S. C Biddle...... '95 

Joseph W Stitt Matthews Biddle '95 

W. D. Rice Slighs, S. 0. 

—10.— 
Total in School of Theology 21. 



Course ot Unstruction, 



The numerals in brackets indicate the number of zveekly recitations. 

Junior Year — First Term. 

Hebrew — Grammar and Manual [5] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [4] The Gospels. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Biblica l History [2] 

Christian Evidences [1] 

ho miletics [2] 

Junior Year — Second Term. 

Hebrew — Grammar and Man ual [5] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [4] The Gospels. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Bible History [2] 

Systematic Theology [I] Hodge's Outlines. 

Homiletics [2] 



6 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Middle Year — First Term. 

II ebrew — Historical Books [2 j Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

blblica l i introduction [2] 

Church History [2] 

Theology [4 1 Hodge's Outlines. 

Christian Ethics [ l J 

Homil et [cs [ 2 ] Broadus. 

Middle Year — Second Term. 

1 1 ebrew — Historical Books ( 2 ] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church Government [2] Hodge. Pres. Law. 

( h riiCH History [2] 

Theo log v [4] Hodge's Outlines. 

( Ihristian Ethics [1 ] 

Homi letics [2] Broadus. 

Senior Year — First Term. 

Hebrew — Prophecy and Poetry [2] 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church History [2 J 

Theology ' [2] Hodge's Outlines. 

Church Government [2] Hodge Pres. Law. 

Pastoral Theology [4] 

Senior Year — Second Term. 

Hebrew — Prophecy and Poetry [2] 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church History [2] 

Theology % [2] Hodge's Outlines. 

Homiletics [2] 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



SCHEDULE. 



School of Theology, First Term, Modified Somewhat by Substi- 
tion in Second Term, but Same Number of Subjects. 





Mondaj'. 


Tuesday. 


Wednesday. 


Thursday. 


Friday. 


A. M. 

9 




Jr. Bib. Hist. 
Mid. Heb. 


Jr. Bib. Hist. 
Mid. Hebrew. 


Sr. Heb. 


Sr. Heb. 

Jr. Ev. Chrst. 













Sr. Ch. Hist. 
Mid. Theol. 
Jr. Gk. Test. 

Sr. Theol. 
Mid Ch.Hist. 
Jr. Hebrew 


Sr. Ch. Hist. 
Mid. Theol. 
Jr. Gk. Test. 

Sr. Theol. 
Mid. Ch.Hist. 
Jr. Hebrew. 


Sr. Past. The. 
Mid. Theol. 
Jr. Gk. Test. 

Sr. Ch. Gov. 
Mid. Horn. 
Jr. Hebrew. 

Sr. Gk. Test. 
Mid. Gr. Test. 
Jr. Bib. Intro. 


Sr. Past. The. 




:::::::::::::::: 


Mid. Theol. 




Jr. Gk. Test. 


Sr. Ch. Gov. 


» 


Jr. Hebrew. 


Mid. Horn. 
Jr. Hebrew. 

Sr. Gk. Test 














Mid. Gr. Test 










Jr. Bib Int 


P. M. 

i:45 










Mid.Chrs.Eth. 
Jr. Horn. 












Jr. Horn. 

















Old Testament — Professor Bissell. 

1. Daring 1892-3, and every second year, a course upon Old 
Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice a week 
for half the year. 

2. Junior Class. Hebrew begun. Recitations five times a 
week throughout the year. Text book : Harper's Elements of 
Hebrew, Harper's Introductory Hebrew Method and Manual. 
Special emphasis is laid upon the acquisition of a vocabulary. 
The inflections of the language and several hundred of the 
commonest words are memorized. There is daily drill in recip- 
rocal oral translation and in writing Hebrew. 

3. Middle Class. Reading from the Historical Books twice a 
week throughout the year. Text book : Hebrew Bible, Harper's 
Hebrew Syntax, Driver's Hebrew Tenses. Special attention 
will be given to the Syntax, to enlarge the vocabulary and to 
rapid reading. For a part of the year the class will take English 
Bibles to the blackboards and, with these alone, write the 
Hebrew from memory. 

4. Senior Class. Reading at sight from the Historical Books. 
Exegesis of Hebrew Prophecy and Poetry, twice a week through- 
out the year. 



8 BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. 

5. During 1893-4, and every second year, such members of 
the Middle and Senior classes as are qualified for it, may make 
a beginning in Comparative Semitic Grammar by reading com- 
paratively the first chapters of Genesis in Hebrew, Aramaic, 
Syriac and Arabic. 

New Testament — Professor Kissel I. 

1. During 1893-4, and every second year, a course upon New 
Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice a week 
for half the year. 

2. a. Junior Class will read the remaining three Gospels with 
reference to the Harmony, and, also, to the distinctive charac- 
acter of each of the four Gospels, four times a week throughout 
the year. 

b. Middle Class will read Ephesians with exegesis, twice a 
week through the year. The other epistles of the captivity — 
Philippians, Colossians and Philemon — will be assigned for 
private reading. A summary of their contents will be considered 
in the class room, and they will be required in the examination. 

c. Senior Class will read Romans with exegesis, twice a week 
through the year. The other epistles of the third Missionary 
Journey, I Corinthians, II Corinthians and Galatians, will be 
assigned for private reading. Their scope and contents will be 
discussed in the school room, and they will be required in the 
examination. 

Systematic Theology — Dr. Sanders. 

In this Department the purpose is to have each student read, 
during his course, some standard work on Systematic Theology, 
and in addition to this to read some authority on Theism. 

This course of reading will be made the subject of the most 
thorough examination and free discussion, and will be supple- 
mented by every available means which are likely to encourage 
and stimulate the student in his search for truth, and in prep- 
arations for its defence. 

Systematic Theology is begun in the second term of the Junior 
year and completed in the Senior year. The doctrines of The- 
ology are preseented didactically, historically and polemically. 
The order of topics pursued is : The nature, forms, and sources 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 9 

of Theology; the being of God, His nature and attributes; the 
Trinity; the Divinity of Christ; the Holy Spirit; the decrees of 
God; creation; providence; miracles; the origin, nature and 
primitive state of man ; the covenant with Adam ; the fall ; sin ; 
imputation ; original sin ; inability ; the covenant of grace ; the 
person of Christ ; His offices ; the nature, necessity, perfection 
and extent of the atonement; His kingdom; His humiliation 
and exaltation; vocation; regeneration; faith; justification; 
sancitication ; the law of God ; eschatology ; the sacraments. 

Practical Theology. 

Homiletics. — Professor Jones. — The work of this Department 
is carried on throughout the Seminary Course. In the Junior 
and Middle years, a text book on the " Preparation and Delivery 
of Sermons " is read. This is supplemented by exercises in the 
analysis of Sermons, and preaching before the Professors and 
students of the University weekly. 

In the middle and Senior classes much attention is given to 
the preparation and criticism of Sermon plans and extempore 
preaching. 

Christian Evidence. — Dr. Hargrave. — By means of Text books 
and discussions the student is aided in verifying the Biblical 
proofs of doctrine and Christian truth as represented in the 
symbols of the church, and he is thus trained to express with 
facility and clearness the revealed will of God. 

Pastoral Theology. — The treatment of this subject is confined 
to the third year of the course. It is designed that each student 
shall become thoroughly acquainted with the best method of 
applying the message of salvation to the hearts and lives of 
men. Lectures are given, accompanied by use of text book. 

The course includes the importance of ministerial piety, prop- 
er habits of study, skill and ability in the various branches of 
church work, the pastor's relation and duty to the various 
courts of the church, and the various private and public duties 
pertaining to his office. 

Church Government. — Dr. Sanders. — Four lectures on the 
general subject are given to the Junior Class. 

In the Middle year the Form of Government with proof texts 



IO BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. 

is taken up and pursued through one term, and a minute com- 
parison with other forms of church polity lb made. 

En the Middle and Senior years, Dr. dodge's work, "Whal Is 
Presbyterian Law?" and the Book of Discipline are used as text 

books, accompanied by lectures. 

BIBLICAL AND ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY— Prof. Jones. 

Since Sacred History is of vital importance as a part of a 
thorough Theological Education, tin- subjecl is pursued through 
the entire three years' course. 

Biblical History is studied by the Junior Class with the 
English version of the Old Testament as a text book, and 
Smith's Old Testament History as a guide, and is taught by 
lectures and constant reference to the typical and preparatory 
nature of the Old Testament. The connection between sacred 
and profane History is pointed out and attention is given to 
Archaeology, Geography and Chronology. 

Ecclesiastical History. — This subject is taken up by the Middle 
Class and is taught by lectures and with text book, covering the 
period from Apostolic times to the Reformation — 16th Century. 

The Senior Class continues the subject from the Reformation 
to the present time, devoting the second term to the history of 
the Presbyterian church in the United States. 

During each year a carefully prepared thesis having for its 
subject some leading personage, epoch, or phase, etc., of sacred 
history, is required from each student. 



BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. II 



Information, 



Admission. 

This School is open to young men of all denominations. 
Candidates for admission must produce evidence that they are 
members in good and regular standing in some evangelical 
church; that they possess competent talent; and that they have 
been regularly graduated at some College or University, or in 
some way they have received an equivalent for the training of a 
College course. Applicants for admission to an advanced stand- 
ing must present a dismission from some other Theological 
Seminary, or be prepared for examination on the subjects which 
have been pursued by the class which they desire to enter. 

When a student who has been a member of any other Theo- 
logical School seeks admission into this, he must produce cer- 
tificate of good standing and orderly dismission ere he can be 
received. 

Exceptional Cases. 

In exceptional cases, promising young men who have not had 
the benefit of a full college course will be received and will be 
allowed to pursue an eclectic course. 

Period of Study. 

The regular course of study, as in the other Seminaries of the 
Church, covers a period of three full years. 

Practical Work. 

The practical work of the Ministry is joined with study, as 
the theological students have opportunites of laboring as sup- 
plies in the neighboring churches during vacation and term 
time. 

With the facilities at hand special and successful efforts are 
made to aid students in obtaining vacation employment along 
the lines of their future work as teachers and preachers among 
the people. 



12 BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. 

Rules and Regulations. 

Except in ii few particulars the students of the school of 
Theology are not subjecl fco the rules and regulations which 
govern those of the other schools of the University. 

Rooms. 

The rooms in Divinity Hall, so far as is neccessary, arc reserved 
for Theological Students. These rooms are furnished with a 
bedstead, mattress, pillows, bureau, washstand, chairs, looking- 
glass, etc., and are heated by steam. 

Expenses. 

There is no charge for tuition or room rent. J^-There is a 
charge of $8.00 per month for board, in connection with the 
Boarding Department where all students living on the grounds 
are required to board. The fee of $8.00 per month covers also 
expenses of fuel, light, and washing of towels and bed clothing. 

Books can be bought on the ground at a liberal discount. 

The Examination. 

The next Annual Examination will be conducted during the 
last week in May. The examination will be oral and written. 
Each student is required to take this examination, and if by 
sickness or absence one fails to take it, he must submit to 
an examination with a corresponding class in a subsequent year. 

Prizes. 

For the year 1896-7, a prize of Ten Dollars is offered to those 
members of the Junior Theological Class, who are in regular 
attendance on the Hebrew recitations from the beginning to the 
close of the school year and who attain a standing of 90 per 
cent, in the daily recitations and in the different class examina- 
tions of the year. In case more than two members of the class 
reach the standard, the amount of two prizes, Twenty Dollars, 
will be divided among the whole number in the ratio of their 
respective grades. 

The prizes in Hebrew for the year 1894-5, were awarded to 
P. A. White of the Middle (5lass and to Chas. H. Shute of the 
Junior Class. 



BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. 1 3 



Scbool of Hrte- 

Faculty of Arts. 

Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 

President. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, D. D., 

Professor of Greek. 

Rev. York Jones, D. D., 
Professor of English Literature, Rhetoric and History. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science and the Evidences 

of Christianity. 

Prof. Geo. E. Davis, A. M., 
Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics and Assistant in Latin. 

Rev. A. P. Bisseu,, D. D., Ph. D., 

Professor of Modern Lauguages. 



Courses, Degrees, and Terms of Admission. 

The School of Arts embraces two courses of study, the Clas- 
sical and the Scientific. Students completing the Classical 
Course satisfactorily receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts; 
those completing the Scientific Course, that of Bachelor of 
Science. Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are 
examined in the studies prescribed in our Preparatory Course, 
or their equivalent in case of those coming from other schools. 

For advanced standing the candidate, in addition to the pre- 
paratory studies, will be examined in those previously studied 
by the class he wishes to enter, or others equivalent to them. 



14 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



The numerals in brackets, indicate the number of weekly recitations. 



classical course. 

Freshman Year. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek . . Xenophon's Anabasis, Books, I, II, III, IV. [4] 

a .... Grammar, Goodwin [4] 

Latin .... Virgil, Greenough [4] 

" .... Allen and Greenough [4] 

History . . . Myers [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [1] 

Sophomore Year — First Term. 

Mathematics . . Geometry, Wentworth [2] 

Greek Homer, Iliad Books I, II, III . . . [4] 

Grammar .... Goodwin 

Latin Horace, Satires and Epistles ... [4] 

Natural Science.. Physics, Gage [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [2] 

Sophomore Year — Second Term. 

Mathematics . . Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek Xenophon's Memorabilia [4] 

Grammar .... Goodwin 

Latin Tacitus's Germania and Agricola . [4] 

Natural Science. Physics, Gage ; Botany, Wood . . [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [2] 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 1 5 

Junior Year — First Term. 

Mathematics.. Plane Trigonometry and Ana'l Geom. . [2] 

Greek . . Plato, Apology and Crito . [3] 

Greek Prose Composition 

Grammar . . Goodwin 

Natural Science . Astronomy, Young [4] 

Rhetoric . . Genung [2] 

German [4] 

Junior Year — Second Term. 

Mathematics . . . Surveying [2] 

f Vocabulary of N. T. Word .... 1 

Greek . . . ] N. T. Words and Tenses, Burton . \ [3] 

1 N. T. Grammar, (Buttman). . . . 

Naturae Science . Physical Geography, Maury: . . [4] 

English Literature [1] 

Rudiments Psychol . Steele [2] 

German [4] 

Senior Year — First Term. 

New Testament . . Acts ) r -. 

Greek, Vocabulary of N. T. Words i J 

Natural Science . . Chemistry, Williams . . . . [4] 

Political Economy [2] 

Logic Jevons, Hill [2] 

Mental Philosophy . Haven, with Lectures . . . . [1] 

English Literature [1] 

Evidences of Christianity . Barrows [2] 

German [2] 

Senior Year — Second Term. 

Greek . . . ( Vocabulary of N. T. Words . . 1 

I New Testament J L J 

Zoology Steele [4] 

Civil Government . Thorpe [1] 

Ethics Robinson [2] 



16 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Mental Philosophy . Haven, with Lectures . . . . [i] 

Science and Reugion . Frazer [3] 

German [2] 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Freshman Year. 

Mathematics . . Algebra and Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

History . . . Myers . . . [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [1] 

Sophomore Year — First Term. 

Mathematics . . . Geometry, Wentworh [2] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

Naturae Science . Physics, Gage [3] 

" " . Physical Geography, Appleton's [4] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [2] 

Sophomore Year — Second Term. 

Mathematics. . . . Geometry, Wentworh . . v [4] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

Natural Science . . Physics, Gage ; Botany, Wood . [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [2] 

Junior Year — First Term. 

Mathematics . . Trigonometry and Ana'l Geometry [2] 

Civil Government [4] 

Natural Science . Astronomy, Young [4] 

German [4] 

Junior Year — Second Term. 

Mathematics . . . Surveying [2] 

Natural Science . Physical Geography, Maury . . [4] 



BIDDER UNIVERSITY. 



17 



English Literature [1] 

Rudiment. Psychol. Steele [2] 

German [4] 

Senior Year — First Term. 
Natural Science . . . Chemistry, Williams . . . [4] 

Political Economy [2] 

Logic Jevons, Hill [2] 

Mental Ppilosophy . . Haven, with Lectures . . . [1] 

English Literature *•*... [1] 

Evidences of Christianity [2] 

German [2] 

Senior Year — Second Term. 

Zoology Steele [4] 

Civil Government . . . Thorpe [1] 

Ethics Robinson [2] 

Mental Philosophy. . . Haven, with Lectures. . . [1] 

Science and Religion . . Frazer [3] 

German [2] 

Throughout the College Course there is a weekly recitation in 
the Bible either in English or Greek. 

Stenography, Typewriting and Book-keeping are taught as 
electives. 

SCHEDULE. 

School of Arts and Sciences, First Term, Modified Somewhat by 

Substitution in the Second Term, but Same Number of Subjects. 



Monday. 



A. M. 



Soph. Greek. 
Jr. Math. 
Sr. Chem. 

Fresh. Math. 
Soph. Phys. 
Jr. German. 

Fresh Bible. 
Soph. Latin. 



Tuesday. 



P. M. 

i:45 



Sr. Gr. Test. 

Fresh. Hist. 
Soph. Bible. 
Jr. Astron. 
Sr. Logic. 

Fresh. Greek 
Sr. German. 



Soph. Greek. 
Jr. Math. 
Sr. Chem. 

Fresh. Math. 
Soph. Phys. 
Jr. German. 

Fresh. Latin. 
Soph. Latin. 
Jr. Greek. 
Sr. Pol. Econ. 

Fresh. Hist. 



Wednesday. 



Soph. Greek. 

Sr. Chem. 

Fresh. Math. 
Soph. Phys. 
Jr. German. 

Fresh. Latin. 
Soph. Latin. 
Jr. Greek. 
Sr. Pol. Eeon. 



Thursday. 



Friday. 



Fresh. Math. : 

Soph. Greek. ! Jr. Rhet. 
Jr. Rhet. | Sr. Chem. 



Soph. Math. 
Jr. German. 

Fresh. Latin. 
Soph. Latin. 



Sr. Ment. Ph. 
Fresh Hist. 



Sr. Logic. 
Fresh. Greek 



Jr. Astron. 
Soph. Rhet. 



Fresh. Greek 
Sr. Ev. Chrst 



Jr. Astron. 
Sr. German. 



Fresh. Greek 
Sr. Ev. Chrst. 



Soph. Math. 
Sr. Eng.Lit. 

Fresh. Lat. 

Jr. Greek. 



Fresh. Rht. 
Jr. Astron. 



Soph. Rhet. 



18 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Natural Science — Prof. Davis. 
Outline. 

/'////sirs — Five months 4 times a wreek. 

Botany — Three months 

Physical Geography — Four months 

Astronomy — Four Months 

Chemistry — Five Months 

Zoology — Three months 

i. Physics. 

During the Sophomore year the following topics, with others, 
will be treated: Mathematieal Physics, Molecular Physics, Hy- 
drostatics, Pneumatics, the Kinetic Theory of Gases, Acoustics, 
Electricty and Magnetism, the Correlation and Conservation of 
Energy. 

Gage's Elements of Physics is used. 

2. Chemistry. 

Chemistry will be studied during the first live months of the 
Senior year. The work embraces the General treatment of 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemistry of the non-metals, the metals, 
organic Chemistry and Chemical Archaeology. 

The lectures on this subject will be illustrated by experiments 
and be followed by reviews and examinations during the course. 
Apparatus and re-agents sufficient for laboratory works will be 
furnished the student at a small cost. 

Williams' Introduction to Chemical Science will be used in 
connection with lectures. 

3. Astronomy. 

The second half of the Junior year is devoted to the study of 
Astronomy; embracing the elementary principles of mathemat- 
ical and physical Astronomy, such as Parallax, Refraction, Lat- 
itude and Longitude, Precession, Nutation, Aberration, Theory 
of tides and lunar eclipses, and elements of a planet's orbit. 

Young's Elements of Astronomy is used. 
4. Botany. 

The subject of Botany is pursued during the last three months 
of the Sophomore year. The student is required to gather 
Specimens of flowers and plants; to analyze and classify the 
same. An herbarium of thirty specimens is required. 

Wood's New Botanist and florist is used. 



BIDULK UNIVERSITY. 1 9 

5. Zoology. 

The last three months of the Senior year will be devoted to 
Zoology. Typical forms will be used to illustrate the subjects 
as they may be obtained in the locality. 

Steel's Fourteen weeks in Zoology is used as a text book. 

6. Physical Geography. 

This subject covers the first half of the Junior year. It 
will be treated mainly by lectures. Maury's Geography will be 
used as a text book; but the student will have daily access to 
such books as Maury's Geography of the Sea, Foye's Child and 
Nature, Guyot's Earth and Man, Goldthwaite's Geographical 
Magazine, Hitter's Comparative Geography, and similar books 
for collateral reading. 

Latin Language and Literature — Prof. Davis. 

Harkness's Latin Grammar will be the standard of reference 
throughout the course. 

Freshman Year: First and Second Terms — Virgil's iEneid, 
first four books. Second term, Juvenal's Satires. 

Sophomore Year: First and Second Terms — Satires and Epis- 
tles of Horace. Special attention will be given to scanning the 
metres of Horace. Lectures on Roman life, art and customs 
will occupy part of the last term. 

Greek — Prof. Frierson. 

The course of study as outlined is intended or designed to lay 
for the ordinary student a foundation for the successful prose- 
cution of the Greek language and literature. 

The Junior class will read from the New Testament one of 
the gospels. Recitations daily till completed. 

The Senior class will read "The Acts of the Apostles" with 
attention to the growth of the Apostolic church. Recitation 
twice per week throughout the school year. 

Examination required of each class. 

flodern Language. German — Prof. Bissell. 

The study of modern languages has been introduced, but for 
the coming year only the German will be taught, in the Classi- 
cal and Scientific courses, pursued by both Juniors and Seniors. 



20 RIDDIJ-; UNIVERSITY. 



Mathematics — Prof. Pride. 



The required coarse in Mathematics comprises Plane and Solid 
Geometry, Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Plane Geometry. — The Freshmen begin with Plane Geometry 
(Wentworth's), in the study of which special attention ifi given 
to the exercises for original demonstration, and that a love for 
and interest in the science may be developed, a free discussion 
of the possibilities of each proposition is encouraged. 

Solid and Spherical Geometry. — This is the prescribed course 
for Sophomores, and in order that the students may have a 
proper notion for solid figures as graphically represented on plane 
surfaces, they are encouraged to make their own models for il- 
lustration. This is facilitated by the co-operation of the indus- 
trial School. 

Trigonometry and Surveying. — The course for Juniors includes 
Trigonometry and Surveying with practical use of instruments. 
Special attention devoted to field work. 

History — Prof. Jones. 

The study of General History is carried through the Freshman 
year with text book and by lectures. On this subject there will 
be three recitations a week. This subject receives that careful 
and exhaustive attention which its importance demands. 

Philosophy — Dr. Hargrave. 

Psychology. — Rudimentary Psychology is taught during the 
second term of the Junior year. 

Mental Science. — Mental Science is taught through the Senior 
year by the use of text books and lectures. 

Moral Science. — Moral Science is studied through the second 
term of the Senior year, and the students are instructed in the 
principles of the Theoretical and practical Ethics. 

Rational Philosophy, or Formal and Particular Logic. — Logic 
is studied so as to make the student familiar with Logical 
Terminology and forms, and with the laws of Discursive 
Thought. 

Civil Government. — Civil government and the Constitution of 
the United States, and Political Economy, are studied in the 
Senior year, and each student is made acquainted with the gov- 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 21 

ernment of the people of the United States, and American citi- 
zenship. 

Evidences of Christianity, Science and Religion, and Theism. — 
Instruction in these subjects is given by means of text books 
and class room discussions during the first term of the Senior 
year. 

Seniors. 

Robert James Boulware Flint Hill, S. C. 

Hunter Holmes Card well Charlotte. 

William Henry Carroll Wauknlla. 

William Meridith Flowers Cairo. 

Samuel James Grier Wlnnsboro, S. C. 

James Monroe Henderson Winnsboro, S. C. 

James Alexander Pethel Charlotte. 

Armand Wendall Scott Wilmington. 

John Henry Sampson Pikeville. 

Henry Clay Littles Coddle Creek. 

James Washington Watkins Martinsville, Va. 

John Elliott W^estberry Mechanicsville, S. C. 

—12— 

Juniors. 

Floyd Joseph Anderson Jetersville, Va. 

William Randall Conners Savannah, Ga. 

Walter Chresfield Coles Aiken, S. C. 

Thaddeus Jerome Coles Aiken, S. C. 

Ludie Fielder Wellford, S. C. 

Miles Junius Jackson Mayesville, S. C. 

George Alexander Morrow G reensboro. 

Walter Thomas Singleton Cheraw, S. C. 

John Edgar Smith Charlotte. 

Isaac I). L. Torrence Huntersville. 

—10— 

Sophomores. 

Prank Madison Boulware Flint Hill, S. C. 

Ernest Caswell Byers Davidson. 

Lucius Billinger Cooper Sardinia, S. C. 

Thomas Ebbort Craig Waxhaw. 

Thomas Henry Davis Mayesville, S. C. 



22 BIDDER UNIYKKSITY. 



Zander Adam Dockery Mangnm. 

Taylor Jirardeau Frierson Sumter, S. ( . 

Hugh Harry Winnsboro, B. C. 

Willam Lorenzo Hudson Stout's. 

John Moses Johnson Blackstocks, S. ('. 

Isaac McLaughlin Martin Mechanicsville, S. ('. 

John Lee Massey Wax haw. 

John Calvin McNeil Red Springs. 

Samuel Isaac Moone Powers, S. C. 

James William Morrison M atthew 8. 

William Randolph Mnldrow Mayesville, S. C. 

Thomas William Nance Yorkville, S. C. 

James Wesley Owens Tinnnonsville, S. 0. 

Moses Samuel Pharr Biddleville. 

Isaac Henry Kussell M onroe. 

John Eli Walker Charlotte. 

Freeman Watson Nottoway ('. II.. Va. 

Richard Edward Williams Goldsboro. 

James Wells Young Shelby. 

—24.— 

Freshmen. 

Claudius Eugene Aiken Abbeville, S. C. 

Charles Edward Alexander Lodo. 

John Richard Baker Lincolnton. 

William Robert Coles Aiken, S. C. 

John Addie Croom Goldsboro. 

Chas. Newton Jenkins Wellford, S. C. 

Samuel William James Camden, S. 0. 

Charles Berkely Johnson Greenville, S. C. 

Edgar Layton Timmonsville, S. C. 

James Eugene Mebane Durham. 

J. L. Massey Waxhaw. 

William Arthur Pethel Charlotte. 

John Augustus Smith Turnersburg. 

George Richard Spaulding Rosindale. 

Lloyd L Spaulding Rosindale. 

George Francis Wilson Mayesville, S. C. 

—16.— 
Total number in School of Arts and Sciences 62. 



BIDDER UNIVERSITY. 23 



Information* 



Students of the School of Arts are subject to all the Rules 
and Regulations for the government of the students of the Uni- 
versity, except that cadet duty and services in the School of In- 
dustries are optional. 

There are two regular examinations, one near the close of each 
of the two terms. The final grading of the Senior class is now 
based upon in part and made up after the second examination, 
which will be given six weeks earlier each year than the general 
examinations, from which time the class will be excused from 
recitations. 

The examinations are oral and written and the requirements 
in connection therewith are absolute, except that a student may 
be conditioned for one term or not more than two studies, and 
the minimum general average for promotion to a higher class is 
65, and any one falling below 50 in any three studies is dropped 
from the School. 

Students are required to conform to the prescribed courses in 
every particular unless expressly excused by the Faculty. 

The discipline is impartial and firm, and all demerits arising 
from misconduct or infringement of the Rules and Regulations 
enter in and modify the grading, and when the number of de- 
merits reaches 25 in any one term the delinquent is subject to 
suspension. 



24 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



preparatory anfc IRormal School. 



FACULTY. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 
President. 

Rev. William F. Brooks, D. D., 

Principal and Professor of English. 

Jas. D. Martin, A. B., 

Assistant Professor of Latin and English. 

Rev. P. G. Drayton, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of English. 

Rev. H. L. McCrory, A. B., 
Tntor. 

The Preparatory School aims to prepare the student thor- 
oughly for the studies of either course of the School of Arts. 
The Preparatory English course is a necessity, as the large ma- 
jority of the students coining to the Institution have not had the 
opportunity to ground themselves in the common English 
branches. Upon completing the studies of this course the stu- 
dent is prepared to teach in the common schools of the State, as 
well as to enter the* Freshman Class. A certificate will be given 
to each student completing this course. 

All applicants for admission to the lowest class of this course 
must be at least twelve years of age, must furnish satisfactory 
testimonials of good moral character, and must be able to pass a 
satisfactory examination in the Fourth Reader, Primary Geogra- 
phy, and Wentwortlrs Grammar School Arithmetic through 
Decimal and Common Fractions. To enter a higher class the 
applicant must pass an examination in the studies of the class 
next below it. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 25 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 
Third Class. 



Swinton's Fifth Reader, Tilden's Grammar School Geography, 
Grammar (Reed and Kellogg's Graded Lessons), United States 
History (Montgomery's), Arithmetic to Stocks and Bonds, Spell- 
ing, Penmanship, Bible (Harper's Smith's Small History), His- 
tory of the Negro Race in America, Ethics for Young People. 

Second Class. 

Latin First Latin Book, Tuell and Fowler. 

English Lessons in Language, Tarbell. 

Mathematics ...Arithmetic and Algebra, Wentworth. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Spelling Once a week throughout the year. 

Dole's American Citizen. 

First Class. 
First Term. 

Latin Caesar. 

Grammar, Allen and Greenough. 
Greek Beginner's Greek, White. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 

English Composition and Rhetoric, Genung's Outlines. 

Mathematics ...Algebra, Wentworth's Elements. 

Physiology Walker. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Drawing Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

Second Term. 

Latin Caesar. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 
Greek Beginner's Greek, W T hite. 

Grammar, Goodwin. 
Mathematics ...Algebra, Wentworth. 

English Composition and Rhetoric, Gegung's Outlines. 

Book Keeping... Scribner. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Spelling Once a week throughout the year. 

Pedagogy Essentials of Method, DeGarmo. 



26 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Third Class. 

Swinton's Fifth Reader, Grammar (Reed and Kellogg's Graded 
Lessons), United States History (Montgomery's), Wentworth's 

Arithmetic to Miscellaneous Examples at end, Spelling, Pen- 
manship, Bible (Harper's Smith's Small History). Tilden's 
Grammar School Geography, Exercises in Declamation. 

Second Class. 

English Lessons in Language, Tarbell. 

Mathematics Arithmetic and Algebra, Wentworth. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Penmanship and Spelling... Once a week throughoul the year. 
Drawing Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

First Class. 

Latin or Greek... First Latin Book, Tuell and Fowler. 
Beginners' Creek, White. 
Grammar, Goodwin. 

Mathematics Algebra, Wentworth completed. 

English Rhetoric and Composition Genung's Outlines. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's utlines. 

Natural Science Physiology, Walker. 

Spelling Once a week throughout the year. 

Pedagogy Essentials of Method, DeGarmo. 

Drawing Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

Exercises throughout both years in Composition, Declamation 
and Vocal Music. 

Every student in the Preparatory and Normal School is re- 
quired to take a trade in the School of Industries. 



BIDDT.E UNIVERSITY. 



27 



SCHEDULE. 

Preparatory and Normal Department. 



FIRST CLASS. 



SECOND CLASS. 



THIRD CLASS. 



A. M. 

9.00 Bible, Monday. 

Latin, Caesar, 4 days. 



9-45 



io.30 



n. 15 



12 to 

12.45 



• 45 



Algebra, every day, 



Rhetoric, every day, first 
term. (Physiology, 
Thursday and Friday, 
second term.) 

Industrial Department, 
every day. 



Greek, Monday, Tues 
day, Friday. *Draw 
ing, Wednesday and 
Thursday. 

Greek, Wednesday and 
Thursday. Music and 
Declamation, Friday 



Write and Spell, Mon- 
day. Arithmetic, 4 
days. 

Eng. Grammar, every 
day. 

Industrial Department, 
every day. 



Bible, Monday. 
Latin, 4 days. 



Algebra, every day 



Civil Government, Mon 
day and Tuesday 
Reading, Wednesday 
and Thursday. Music 
and Declamation, Fri 
day. 



Bible, Monday. 
Geography, 4 days. 



Arithmetic, every daj'. 



Language lessons and 
Grammar, every day. 



U. S. History, 3 days. 
tFlem. Ethics, Thurs- 
day and Friday. 

Industrial Department, 
every day. 



Write and Spell, Mon- 
day, Tuesday. Read- 
ing, Wednesday, 
Thursday. Declama- 
tion, Friday. 



♦Elements of Bookkeeping and Pedagogy, Second Term. tNegro History, Sec- 
ond Term. 

First Class. 

Wade Hampton Ancrum Cash's Depot, S. 0. 

Jacob Baggett Lnmberton. 

Charles Jeremiah Baker Graham ville, S. C. 

William Mark Barnwell Beaufort, S. C. 

Miller Calhoun Cooper Mayesville, S. C. 

Edward Elmoore Drinkwater Nottoway C. H., Ya. 

Samuel Lee Fulwood Mayesville, S. C. 

Hurbert Bruce Grigg Biddle University. 

William Albert Grigg. Biddle University. 

Walter Clarence Hargrave. Lexington. 

John Moultrie Harleston Charleston, S. C. 

Robert Beauregard Henderson Hunters ville. 

John David Howie Harrisburg. 

Benjamin Franklin Lewis Lnmberton. 

Cornelius Eobert Means Charlotte. 

Joseph James Mason Keeling, Tenn. 



28 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

William Bloom Moone Powers, S. ('. 

Edward Washington Murray Rembert, S. ('. 

John Andrew Patterson Matthews. 

Joseph Samuel Patton Troy, 8. C. 

Paul Tunstall Rison Danville, Va. 

James Leonard Scott Danville, Va. 

Elliott Madison Sims Wiunsboro, S. ( '. 

Henry Wilson Spaulding Rosindale. 

Augustus Avery Thomas Sumter, 8. ( '. 

Jacob Thompson Charlotte. 

Richard Rominger W T atkins Keidsville. 

William Henry Wright Amelia ('. H., \'a. 

—28.— 

Second Class. 

James Robert Barber Blackstock, S. ('. 

John Robert Beaver Kadesh, Va. 

Charles Alexander Booker Deatonsville. Va. 

Rufus Kisslar Bristow Rock Hill, S. C. 

Edward Bouchet Brooks Biddle University. 

Edward Kirby Brown Spartanburg, S. C. 

Eugene Pearson Brown Wilmington. 

Adam Daniel Bruen Beaufort, S. 0. 

Eugene George Bumpass Durham. 

Eurney George Burney Rosendale. 

Walter Monroe Caldwell Hunters ville. 

David Wads worth Cannon Concord. 

Francis Henry Cardozo Chester, S. C. 

David Thomas Cardwell Charlotte. 

John William Carter Mayes ville, S. C. 

William Seward Crosby Greensboro. 

Richard James Christmas Oxford. 

Jacob Alexander Davis Pineville. 

Charles Baxter Dixon Charlotte. 

William Dubose Shamrock. 

William Zenos Foster Biddleville. 

William Bratton Gilliard Ridgeway, S. C. 

William Aldrich Gilmore Lewis' Turnout, S. C 

William Green Sumter, S. C. 



BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. 29 

Earnest Claywood Grigg Biddle University. 

John Calvin Hargrave Wilmington. 

James Kennon Holmes Petersburg, Va. 

Elmer George Haskins Mebanes. 

John William Jamerson Martinsville, Va. 

James Rattray Scott Jeffrey Br. Guiana, Demerara, S. A. 

Walter Alexander Jenkins Steel Creek. 

Ralph Eugene Jones McConnellsville, S. C. 

Thomas Edward Jones Charlotte. 

John Richard Logan Danville, Va. 

Henry Marion Martin Mechanicsville, S. C. 

George Lewis McLean Bunn's Level. 

Lucius Alexander McLeod Bennettsville, S. C. 

Edward James McLeod Anderson, S. C. 

Charles Richard McClure Biddleville. 

John Adam Nicholson Rockingham. 

Morris Samuel Noah Alba, S. C. 

Joseph Richard Pearson Walterboro, S. C. 

Abe Bethel Penn Mount Airy. 

Robt. Monroe Pickens Statesville. 

Melbourne Percy Ramsey Petersburg, Va. 

Francis Cardoza Reese Mayes ville, S. C. 

Reubin Russell Walkup. 

Thomas Alfred Scott Wilmington. 

William Mattock Simond Matthews. 

Ladd. Patrick Sims Winnsboro, S. C. 

Prince Debout Smith Wilmington. 

Empy Grant Spaulding Rosindale. 

John Wihatt Starnes Monroe. 

Arthur Stitt Biddleville. 

Robert Cross Terry Gibson's Mills. 

George Washington Thompson Raleigh. 

Waddie O'Hear Thompson Greenville, S. C. 

Robert Othoa Tyler Charlotte. 

Thomas Robert Vanderhost Ridge way, S. C. 

Odie Green Walker Charlotte. 

Robert Alexander Walker Rock Hill, S. C. 

Columbus White Charlotte. 

John Franklin Whitley Martindale. 



30 BIJ)])J,K UNIVERSITY. 

Albert Coles Williams Columbia, S. ('. 

Edward Williams Bellefield, S. C. 

Otto Simmons Williams Colombia, S. C. 

George Lee Winn Wedgefield, 8. C. 

James Edward Young Biddleville. 

—68.— 

Third Class. 

William Allison Davenporl . 

Edward David Armstrong Brunswick, Ga. 

Harry Pearse Bearden C harlot t < \. 

James Lee Black Hopewell. 

Lee Black M ati hews. 

Claudius Joseph Bradshaw Biddlevi lie. 

Isaac Cureton Brown Winnsboro, S. ('. 

William Henry Bryant Salisbury. 

James Arthur B vers ( I reen sboro. 

William Cantey Charlotte. 

Anthony Benjamin Caruthers Providence. 

Baxter Caldwell Harrisburg. 

Thomas Garriett Clarke Wilson. 

Henry George Corn well Charlotte. 

Henderson Crawford Cluster. 

Ailey Walter Davis Pineville. 

John Davis Charlotte. 

Henry Davis Shamrock. 

Clarence Wood Deane Statesville. 

Charles Gandy Mount Clair. S. C. 

Edward Lawrence Graham Monroe. 

Thomas Walter Graham Monroe. 

Samuel Eice Griffin L T ncas. 

James Seabrum Harris Harrisburg. 

Samuel Matthew Hemphill Charlotte. 

John W. Henderson Bristow. 

Reuben Joseph James Columbia, S. C. 

John Thomas Jackson Athens Ga. 

J ames Logan Jenkins Salisbury. 

.Joseph Houston Kelly Brunswick, Ga. 

Robert Kirkpatrick Matthews. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 3 1 

Arnold Winston Logan Greenwood, S. G. 

Winbush Lucius McBeth Charlotte. 

Joseph Milas McLean Shop town. 

William Franklin McLeod Anderson, S. 0. 

John Martin Miller Sharon, S. 0. 

Monroe Morse Steele Creek. 

Edward Alexander Murdock Statesville. 

Harvey Lee Murphy Statesville. 

Edward Marcellus Trever Murray... Mooresville. 

Neil Lincoln Nicholson Elerbe. 

Walter Lewis Patterson Eastfield. 

Gibson Peeler Biddleville. 

George Henry Pettie Martinsville, Va. 

Smilie Hamilton Pharr Biddleville. 

Sylvester Pharr , Harrisburg. 

Samuel Powell Charlotte. 

Isaac Porter Providence. 

John Garner Porter Providence. 

Samuel Russell Sardis. 

William Russell Fort Mill, S. C. 

Joseph Saville Concord. 

Joseph Simond Matthews. 

Moses Spears Harrisburg. 

Edward Springs Fort Mill, S. C. 

John Thomas Smith Charlotte. 

Maurice Smith Wilmington. 

Charles Isham Taylor Anderson, S. C. 

Robert Thomas Taylor Davenport. 

John Memphord Waddell Oak Forest. 

Frank William Walker Charlotte. 

Andrew Wallace Sardis. 

Benjamin Millard Wallace Sardis. 

Brilliant Standhope Wallace Furr's P. 0. 

Sidney Johnson Wentz Couborn's Store. 

Brooks Robert Williamson Society Hill, S. C. 

Samuel Withers Steele Creek. 

Thomas Young Concord. 

William Robert Young Biddleville. 

—69.— 



32 BIDDUv UNIVERSITY. 

Scbool of lln&ustriee 

H. A. Hunt, Superintendent. 



All students in the Preparatory Course are required to take 
some trade, and report every day for work in the Industrial 
School. 

At present six trades are being taught — Carpentering, Print- 
ing, Bricklaying, Plastering, Tailoring and Shoemaking. Each 
student is allowed to have his choice of trades being taught, but 
no changes will be allowed after the choice is once made. One- 
sixth of the time in recitation hours is devoted to industrial 



training. 



WOOD WORK— H. A. Hunt, Foreman. 



Carpentry and Joinery are taught in a room provided with 
twelve cabinet benches, each of which is fitted up with a set of 
carpenter's tools. 

Students are taught the use and care of these tools, the prin- 
ciples of wood working — from drawings and models — and have 
also such practical instruction as can be had from improvements 
and repairs of the buildings and furniture of the University. 

Besides doing the necessary work for the school a limited 
amount of work is done for outside parties. Two Professors' 
houses have been built by the students, also a boiler house ; and 
extensive repairs have been made on other buildings. 

THE PRINTING OFFICE— William E. Hill, Foreman. 

This office is equipped as any regular, first-class printing es- 
tablishment would be. Besides the ordinary office furniture it 
has three first-class printing presses. 

In this office the Africo- American Presbyterian and the Biddle 
University Record are set up and printed, and job work is done, 
thus giving the students actual printing office instruction and 
practice, both in type-setting and presswork. The office is 




Is 

i 






BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 33 

amply equipped for doing excellent work, and the instruction is 
thorough and practical. 

THE SHOE SHOP— W. B. riiddleton, Foreman. 

The shoe shop is fitted up with twelve shoemakers' benches, 
each of which is provided with a set of tools. Students are 
taught the use and care of these tools, and such work as is done 
in a regular shoe shop — sewing, pegging, nailing, cementing, 
patching, half-soling, fitting, lasting and putting together new 
work. 

By doing all the work for the students and professors ample 
opportunity is given for making this branch of work thoroughly 
practical. 

HASONRY AND PLASTERING— R. A. Walker and R. K. 
Bristow, Foremen. 

These two trades have been introduced and instruction in 
them is being given daily with very satisfactory results. These 
branches are putting a goodly number in possession of skill that 
will command work and good pay. 

It is proposed to further enlarge this department by adding 
Tailoring and Blacksmithing, also to organize a branch of agri- 
culture. 

TAILORING— J. T.Jackson, Foreman. 

The room for this branch of industry is provided with all 
necessary facilities for teaching and learning this important 
trade. Cleaning, pressing, hand and machine sewing, repairing 
and making new work are done, and the various elementary prin- 
ciples of the trade are taught. The advanced students are taught 
cutting and fitting. 

Number of Students in Carpentry 37 

" " " Printing 46 

" " k> " Shoemaking 16 

" Brickwork 22 

" Plastering 7 

" " " Drawing 28 

Tailoring 21 

Total 177 



3| BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



Summary. 



School of Theology, 

Senior Class 5 

Middle Class 6 

Junior Class 10 — 21 

The School of Arts. 

Senior Class 12 

Junior Class 10 

Sophomore C lass 24 

Freshman Class 16 — 62 

The Preparatory and Normal School. 

First Class 28 

Second Class 68 

Third Class 69—165 

Total Enrollment 248 

The School of Industries. 

In the Five Trades 165 

Total 413 

Counted Twice 165 

Total Enrollment 248 



BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. 35 



Zbe 1bome Department. 

Rev. David Brown, A.H., Superintendent. 



This department includes the orderly keeping of the grounds, 
the supervision of the dormitories and the public buildings, and 
all that pertains to the immediate management of the students 
as to board and home life. 

The Superintendent and his family live among the students 
and give to them such care and attention as they would receive 
in a well organized Christian home. 

Except the day students, all are required to live in this de- 
partment. 

The cost of living is eight dollars ($8.00) per month, payable 
two months in advance, which includes boarding, furnished 
rooms, light, fuel and washing, except wearing apparel. This 
can be had at one dollar per month. 

Boarders are not received for less than one month, and no de- 
duction can be made for absence unless ordered by the Faculty. 



36 BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. 



(Beneral Unformation. 



The School Year consists of one session of two terms, com- 
mencing on the first Wednesday of October and closing on the 
first Wednesday of Jnne. Students wishing to enter should 
make early application. The best interests of the Institution 
and of the student require that he report himself for duty 
promptly at the opening of each term. 

Tuition. 

There is no charge for tuition, except in the case of local stu- 
dents, who are charged $4 per session. 

Literary Societies. 

There are four flourishing literary societies — the Mattoon, the 
Olariosophic, the Johnson and the Douglass. The exercises con- 
sist of composition, discussion and debate, and there is a Moot 
Court connected with them. These societies are governed by 
laws enacted by themselves, and their officers are also elected by 
themselves. The students are required each to become a member 
of one of these societies and to attend upon the exercises. The 
whole is under the supervision of the Faculty. 

The Library and Reading Room. 

A large airy room on the first floor of the main building has 
been set apart as Library and a similar one on the third floor as 
a Reading Room. 

The former contains about 8,500 volumes of commentaries and 
religious literature, and also a variety of the works of standard 
authors. About 500 volumes and 100 pamphlets have been 
added during the year. 

The latter is well supplied with many of the best religious and 
secular weekly and daily papers. 

The students have frequent access to Library and Reading 
Room under special regulations. 



BIDDLR UNIVERSITY. 37 

College Y. M. C. A. 

A college branch of the Y. M. 0. A. is in successful operation, 
with a membership of over 100. It is earnestly desired that all 
the students identify themselves with this noble work. 

Pecuniary Aid. 

Candidates for the ministry and young men of promise will 
receive such aid as their necessities and the resources at command 
will allow. Friends in Scotland have established a fund of over 
$6,000, the interest of which is to be used to aid young men pre- 
paring for mission work in Africa. 

Location and Design in the Establishment of the 
Institution. 

The University is located at Charlotte, North Carolina, and is 
named in memory of the late Maj. Henry J. Biddle, of Philadel- 
phia, whose widow, Mrs. Mary I). Biddle, has been one of its 
most liberal supporters. It is chartered, by the Legislature of 
the State and. is under the auspices of the Presbyterian Church 
in the II. S. A. 

The object of the Institution is the education of colored teach- 
ers and preachers, and leaders for the race in other walks of life. 

It stands at the terminus of seven railroads, in the midst of a 
dense and comparatively intelligent colored population, and oc- 
cupies a site of sixty acres in the suburbs of the city. 

It is situated in the heart of the South Atlantic region, which 
contains the two Synods of Atlantic and Catawba, having 320 
colored churches, 180 ministers, scores of young men in prepara- 
tion for the ministry, with a large number of schools and acade- 
mies under their care. These schools and churches must be fur- 
nished with intelligent Christian teachers and preachers, who 
must be largely educated on the field, and in contact with the 
people among whom they are to labor. Such a training is given 
here at less expense than it could be elsewhere ; the student has 
the best opportunities for a liberal education together with the 
refining influence of a Christian home, and he is kept at the same 
time in contact and sympathy with the people. 



38 HIUIJIJ', UNIVERSITY. 



Wants of tbc llnetitution. 



First. In the language of a Secretary of the Freedmen's Board. 
" Permanent Endowment Funds for the adequate support of the 
Professors is an imperative necessity." Five thousand dollars 
($5,000) have been secured for the President's chair. 

Second. Scholarships: The establishment of which shall yield 
$100 each per annum, to enable needy and promising students in 
the higher departments to pursue their studies, continuously, 
through the college year ; and in addition to this a few hundred 
dollars annually, to be placed in the hands of the Faculty, to be 
used at its discretion, in aiding needy and worthy students, is a 
great desideratum. 

Third. Donations of Clothing, for distribution among needy 
students, are earnestly solicited. 

Fourth. Useful books for the Library are much needed, works 
of reference, biography, history and science. A Library Fund 
is much needed, that purchases may be made from time to time 
of new and useful books. 

Fifth. Three thousand five hundred dollars to aid in enlarg- 
ing and improving the School of Industries. 



BIDDER UNIVERSITY. 39 



Conclusion. 



No institution in the care of the Presbyterian Church has a 
wider field or greater opportunities. Its students are gathered 
from all the South Atlantic and other States, and are scattered 
in their school and church work through all this vast region, 
and as far west as Texas. 

The Institution is consecrated to the glory of God and the wel- 
fare of a needy race. It is the only institution of its kind main- 
tained by our Presbyterian Church in the South; and it certainly 
is one of the most important agencies in the hands of the Church 
for the accomplishment of good among eight millions of Afro- 
Americans. It commends itself to the prayers and gifts of all 
good men. 

The importance in the eyes of the Church, of the interests 
which Biddle University represents, is forcibly put in the lan- 
guage of a recent circular addressed to churches on its behalf by 
the Board of Missions for Freedmen : 

" What is done," say they, " for Biddle University, will, in a 
great measure, determine the success of our whole work among 
the Freedmen." 

" Indifference to the Biddle University is indifference to our 
whole work among the Freedmen. If liberally supported, no 
missionary undertaking will return speedier and more abundant 
fruit. Where are the men and women who will build up this 
Institution for the glory of God and the good of a needy race? " 

The Presbyterian Journal says : 

" Aiming to do a thorough work of education, there can be no 
question that it (Biddle University) is already doing a great work 
with the promise of still greater results hereafter." 

Rev. E. P. Cowan, D. D., Corresponding Secretary of the Board 
of Missions for Freedmen, says : 

" The best argument in favor of Biddle University as at pres- 
ent organized, is the good condition in which it now is, and the 



40 BIDDUv UNIVERSITY. 

good work that is now being (lone. This can be seen by anyone 
who will take'the time and trouble to visit the place and examine 

for himself. 

"The order and decorum of the students is remarkable. The 
rules are stringent and obeyed. The buildings are well kept. 

'.'The Industrial Department is better organized and more 
efficient than it ever was before in the history of the Institution. 
Professor Hunt, a graduate of Atlanta University, is a practical 
carpenter. 

" Look into the shoe shop and you find a dozen young men 
(the room will hold no more) who an hour before were reading 
Greek and Latin ; now they arc sitting on cobbler's benches and 
are driving wooden pegs. In the next room a dozen or more are 
setting type, while two others are turning a large printing press, 
and a third man is 'feeding' the machine. 

"I visited every class room in the institution, and found the 
instructor able to instruct: the learner able to learn. I devoutly 
wish every friend of the work could visit the school. Jf this 
were possible, the University would have all the money it needs. 
Its professors are workmen that need not be ashamed. Their 
work suffers most from not being known, or clearly understood. 
The institution is now running up to its utmost capacity as re- 
gards numbers. 

"If the University only had the necessary accommodations and 
scholarships, the roll would easily run up to 500. Over thirty 
good applications for admission this year were declined for lack 
of funds. 

"We have come to the point where the Presbyterian Church, 
in its w r ork among the freedmen, must decide whether it is going 
to have a large, strong, first-class University or not. Here is our 
opportunity. It is a grand one. If we seize it future genera- 
tions will say, ' How wise ! ' If we neglect it, they will say, 
' How foolish ! ' " 

In the Church at Home and Abroad, Rev. Edward B. Hodge, 
D. D., Corresponding Secretary of the Board of Education of the 
Presbyterian Church, says : " A recent visit to Charlotte, N". C, 
enabled the Secretary to make something of an inspection of the 
working of Biddle University. The situation of the institution 
is most delightful, commanding a wide view of the surrounding 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 4 1 

country. It is sufficiently far from town for the purpose of 
academic seclusion, and yet near enough for all purposes of con- 
venience. President Sanders presides over the institution with 
ability and skill to a degree that commends him to the favorable 
comments of such intelligent observers as the pastors of the Pres- 
byterian Churches in Charlotte. It is very gratifying to find 
with what interest they are regarding our work among the col- 
ored people. One of them recently personally visited Biddle 
University and made a most acceptable address to the students. 
There is great need for additional room for students. The num- 
ber is far larger than can be properly accommodated. It is de- 
lightful to find what an eagerness for learning the students dis- 
play, and, in many cases, a very decided aptitude. The order 
and discipline of the University is excellent." 

In proof of the estimation in which it is held by prominent 
Southern men, see the following extract from a letter by the late 
Hon. Z. B. Vance, United States Senator from North Carolina: 

" * * * 1 am well acquainted with Biddle University, and 
I think it better circumstanced to do good than any other insti- 
tution of the kind in the South. The whole people of the region 
are fully in accord with its objects." 

From Rev. Drury Lacy, T). I)., late President of Davidson Col- 
lege, North Carolina: 

" I firmly believe that Biddle University is doing a greater 
work for missions, foreign and domestic, than any mission at 
home or abroad." 

From Dr. E. Nye Hutchinson : 

" It is my earnest prayer that some liberal Presbyterian may 
fully endow Biddle University, and make it not only useful to 
its generation at home, but a blessing to the world. " 



42 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



1. No one under twelve years of age will be admitted to the 
school. Applicants A\ho are strangers to the faculty must bring 
a satisfactory certificate of good character, and steady industri- 
ous habits. Every student, by his enrollment, contracts to 
obey the regulations of the University. 

2. Students are expected at all times to act with respect and 
courtesy toward their instructors and fellow students, and ob- 
serve cleanliness and neatness in person, clothing and room. 

3. All students, except day scholars, are required to attend 
chapel exercises each morning except Saturday. 

4. In order to preserve health, cultivate manual skill, de- 
velop taste, and at the same time keep the buildings in order, 
and improve and beautify the grounds, all students except day 
scholars are expected to work one hour each day. 

5. Students from abroad are required to board in the Home 
unless excused by the faculty ; and when so excused shall be re- 
garded as day scholars and shall pay $2.00 per term. Board, 
including furnished room, light, fuel and washing of bed clothes, 
is $8.00 per calendar month — payment two months in advance. 
Any student, who, without satisfactory arrangement, shall not 
pay within ten days from the first of the month, shall forfeit 
the privileges of the institution. 

6. Day pupils must pay their dues, $2.00 per term, at the 
beginning of each term, and while on the grounds be subject to 
all the rules of the institution. 

7. Punctuality and diligence in regard to all duties and ex- 
ercises are required. 

8. During the time set apart for study, students will remain 
in their rooms or in such places as may be designated for study. 
'Calking, loud studying, or visiting from room to room during 
study hours, and boisterous rude conduct in any of the build- 
ings at any time are prohibited. All students are expected to 



BIDDLK UNIVERSITY. 43 

be in their rooms and quiet bet ween 10 p. m. and 6 a. m. All 
lights out at 10:80 p. m. 

9. Low j vulgar or profane language, the use of ardent spirits, 
wine or beer, tobacco in any form, keeping or handling of pis- 
tols, and all games of chance are prohibited. 

10. Students are forbidden to mark or deface in any way the 
buildings or furniture, or to throw slops, waste water, paper, or 
anything^ that would cause a nuisance, from the windows or 
about the grounds. Any damage done by wantonness or care- 
lessness must be paid for by the person doing the same. 

11. Students are forbidden to entertain other students, their 
friends, or strangers in their rooms over night. Students having 
friends for whom they desire either meals 01 lodging will report 
to the Superintendent. 

12. The students are forbidden to hold any public meetings 
on the premises of the University for any purpose whatever 
without special permission from the President. 

13. The students are forbidden to give entertainments of any 
character and invite guests without special permission. 

14. Students are allowed to attend church in Charlotte on 
Sabbath afternoon ; but no one will be permitted to leave the 
grounds at other times without special permission. 

15. A monitor shall be appointed for each floor or building 
who shall report any neglect or disorder. 

16. Violation of the rules will subject the offender to dis- 
cipline. 

TIME TABLE. 



6-00 A. M— Rising Bell 

6-45 " — Warning Bell. 

7-00 " —Breakfast. 

8-25 " —Cadet Inspection. 

8-30 " —Chapel Warning Bell. 

8-40 " —Chapel Bell. 

8-45 " —Gong— Doors Closed. 

9-00 " — 1st Recitation. I Bell. 

10-00 " — 2d Recitation. | Three 

11-00 " —3d Recitation. \ Minutes. 

12-00 M. —4th Recitation. | Before. 

12-45 p - M.— Close. J 



12-50 P. 

i-45 
2-30 

3-15 
4-00 
5-00 
6-00 
7-00 

9-45 
10-00 
10-30 



M. — Dinner. 

' — Gong— 1st Rec. ) Bell 3 
' —Gong— 2d Rec. f Minutes 
— Gong— Close. \ Before. 
' —Work Hour Bell. 
' —Cadet Drill. 
' —Supper. 
' —Study Hours Bell. 
' —Close Study Hours Bell. 
' —Night Bell. 
' — Lights Out Bell. 



STUDY HOURS. 



MONDAY .... From 7-00 to 9-45 P- M. 
TUESDAY.... From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 
WEDNESDAY From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 



THURSDAY.. From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 

FRIDAY From 7-00 to 9-45 P. M. 

SATURDAY.. From 9-00 to 12 P. M: 



44 BIDDLF. UNIVERSITY. 

flEETINGS. 

bUNDAY 8-30 A. M., Warning S. S. Bell ! SUNDAY 7-30 P. M., Ch. Warning Bell. 
SUNDAY 8-40 A. M., S. S. Bell. SUNDAY 7-50 P M., Church Bell. 

SUNDAY 8-45 A. M., Gong. I SUNDAY 8-00 P. M., Church Gong. 

TUESDAY 6-30 P. M., Student's I'raver Meeting. 
THURSDAY 6-30 P. M., V. M. C. A. Meeting. 

FRIDAY 7-00 to 9.45 l J . M., Societies. 

Each student on entering the University is required to sign 
the following : 

/, A. B., noio entering Biddle University as a student, do sol- 
emnly promise to obey all the rules and regulations for the govern- 
ment of students, as long as 1 remain a member thereof. 

I Signed) A. B. 



TTlniveusitp Calendar. 



1896. 



Friday, May 29, 7-30 p. in. Preparatory closing exercises. 

Annual Address, Normal and Preparatory School, by Rev. 

S. C. Thompson, Camden, S. C. 
Sunday, May 31, 3 p. m. Baccalaureate Sermon by Rev, D. J. 

Sanders, D. D. 
Monday, June 1, 7-30 p. m. Junior Prize Contest. 
Tuesday, June 2, 7-30 p. m. Address before the Alumni by Rev. 

8. F. Wentz, Class of 'SC. 
Wednesday, June 3, 10-30 a. m. Commencement Exercises. At 

3 p. m., Annual Address, by Hon. Ceo. II. White,. New- 

berne, N". C. 
Tuesday, Oct. 6, 3 p. m. Examination of applicants for admis- 
sion begins. 
Wednesday, Oct. 7. First Term begins. 
Thursday, Dec. 24. Winter Vacation begins. 

1897. 
Sunday, Jan. 10. Day of Prayer for College. 
Monday, Feb. 2. Second Term begins. 

Friday, March 28. Joint Exhibition of the Literary Societies. 
Wednesday, June 4. Commencement. 



<)^> 00<X><><><X>0<K>000<KK >0<><^ gj^g^ 



-0<KWXHK><>00<><><><>0<H>0<K>0<><><><X><XKKK^ 

CATALOGUE 

OF 

BlDDLiE UfUVEt^SITY, 

Charlotte, N. C. 

1897-98, 



AND 



GENERAL CATALOGUE 



00000<K><><><>0<XM><><><K>0<><><^^ 



<HXX><>0<KKKKK><><K><H>0<><><>^^ 



/'., 



Tfa 



to 



^ 



«+ 4 V, 



^ 



%. 







^ : 



. :-, 




TWENTY-NINTH 



Annual Catalogue 



OF 



BIDDUE UfUVE^SITY, 



Charlotte, N. C. 



1897-98. 



UNDER THE CAKE OF THE BOARD OF MISSIONS FOR 

FREEDMEN OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IN THE U. S. A., PITTSBURG, PA. 



Boarfe of Urustees. 



Class whose term will expire June ist, 1898. 

Rev. I). S. Bakek, Lineolnton, N. C 
Rkv. J. P. E. Kumleb, D. D., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Mr. Robert S. Davis, Pittsburg, Pa. 
J. C. McCombs, Esq., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Prof. J. C. Marquis, Chester, S. C. 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1899. 

Rev. G. 0. Campbell, Burkeville, Va. 
Rev. R. P. Wyche, D. D., Charlotte, N. C. 
Rev. W. R. Coles, Aiken, S. C. 
L. P. Berry, Esq., Charlotte, N. C. 

Class whose term will expire June ist, 1900. 

*Rev. A. S. Billingsley, Statesville, N. C. 
Rev. S. Loomis, A. M., Tryon City, N. C. 
Rev. H. N. Payne, D. D., Atlanta, Ga. 
Mr. C. S. Riggs, Pittsburg, Pa. 



©fficers. 



Rev. R. P. Wyche, President. 
D. J. Sanders, Acting Treasurer. 
L. P. Berry, Esq., Secretary. 
* Deceased. 



ffacults. 

Rev. D. J. Sanders, D, D., 

President and Professor of Systematic and Ecclesiastical 

Theology. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D., Ph. D., 

Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis and German. 

Rev. Yorke Jones, D. D. 

Professor of Homiletics, History, Rhetoric and English 

Literature. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Christian 

Evidences. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, D. D., 

Professor of Greek. 

Prof. George E. Davis, A. M., 

Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

*Rev. W. F. Brooks, D. D, 

Professor and Principal of Preparatory School. 

J. D. Martin, A. M., 

Assistant Professor. 

Rev. P. G. Drayton, A. B., 

Assistant Professor. 

Rev. H. L. McCrorey, A. B., 

Assistant Professor. 

H. A. Hunt, A. B., 

Superintendent of the School of Industries and Home 

Department. 

A. U. Frierson, 

Librarian. 
George E. Davis, 
Secretary of Faculty. 
* Deceased. 



XTbe Scbool of Ubeolog^. 



FACULTY. 

Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 

President and Professor of Systematic and Ecclesiastical 

Theology. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D., Ph. D.. 

Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis. 

Rev. Yorke Jones, D. D., 

Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History and 

Homiletics. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 

Professor of Christian Evidences and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. A. U. Friekson, D. D., 

Assistant Professor of Greek Exegesis. 



Senior Class. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. COLLEGE. GRAD. 

Albert S. Cottingham . . . Bennettsville, S. C. . Biddle 

John H. Clement Mocksville Biddle 

Alonzo J. Jefferson, A. B. . Mayesville, S. C. Biddle . . . '95 
Archie P. Johnson, A. B. . Gulhiiesville, S. C. . Biddle . . . '95 

William L. Metz, A. B. . Clinton, S. C Biddle . . '95 

—5— 

Middle Class. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. COLLEGE. GRAD. 

William H. Carroll, A. B. Waukulla Biddle . . . '96 

Samuel J. Grier, A. B. Winnsboro, S. C. ... Biddle . '96 
Isaac H. Russell Monroe Biddle 



B1DDLE UNIVERSITY. 5 

John H. Sampson, A. B. Pikesville Biddle ... '96 

Thomas James Smith . . . .Geod Fortuin, W. B. Demerara 

S. A. St. Thos 
W. Edward Williams .Boydton, Va. . . .Boydton Inst. . '96 

Samuel L. Young Due West, S. C Biddle 

John Daniel Lewis Lumberton Albion Acad. '96 

— 8— 

Junior Class. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. COLLEGE. GRAD. 

Floyd J. Anderson, A. B. . Jetersville, Va Biddle . . .'97 

Charles A. Hendricks . Den Amastel, W. C, Demerara, 

British Guiana, S. A. 

Miles J. Jackson, A. B. . . Mayesville, S. C Biddle . . .'97 

—3— 
Total in School of Theology, 16. 



Course of flnstvuction, 



The numerals in brackets indicate the number of weekly recitations. 



Junior Year — First Term. 

Hebrew— Grammar and Manual. .. [5] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [4] The Gospels. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Biblical History [2] 

Christian Evidences [1] 

Homiletics [2] 

Junior Year — Second Term. 

Hebrew — Grammar and Manual. . . [5] Harper. 
Greek Exegesis [4] The Gospels. 



6 riddle university. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Bible History [2] 

Systematic Theology [1] Hodge 's Outlines. 

Homiletics [2] 

Middle Year — First Term. 

Hebrew — Historical Books [2] Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Biblical Introduction [2] 

Church History [2] 

Theology [4] Hodge's Outlines 

Christian Ethics [1] 

Homiletics [2] Broadus. 

Middle Year — Second Term. 

Hebrew— Historical Books [2^ Harper. 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church Government [2] Hodge Pres. Law. 

Church History [2] 

Theology * [4] Hodge's Outlines. 

Christian Ethics [1] 

Homiletics [2] Broadus. 

Senior Year — First Tirm. 

Hebrew — Prophecy and Poetry [2] 

Greek Exegesis [2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church History [2] 

Theology [1] Hodge's Outlines. 

Church Government [3] Hodge Pres. Law. 

Pastoral Theology [4] 

Homiletics [1] 

Senior Year — Second Term, 

Hebrew — Prophecy and Poetry [2] 

Greek Exegesis. .[2] Pauline Epistles. 

Church History [2] 

Theology . [2] Hodge's Outlines. 

Homiletics [2] 



KIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



SCHEDULE. 

School of Theology, First Tjrm, Modified Somewhat by 
Substitution in Second Term, but Same Number of Subjects. 





Monday. 


Tuesday. 


Wednesday. 


Thursday. 


Friday. 


A. M. 
9 




Jr. Bib. Hist. 
Mid Heb. 


Jr. Bib. Hist. 
Mid. Heb. 


Sr. Heb. 


Sr. Heb. 

Jr. Ev. Cbrst. 








10 :1a 




Sr. Ch. Hist. 
Mid. Theoi. 
Jr. Gk. Test. 

Sr. Theol. 
Mid. Ch. Hist. 
Jr. Hebrew. 


Sr. Ch. Hist. 
Mid. Theol. 
Jr. Gk. Test 

Sr. Ch. Gov. 
Mid. Ch. Hist 
Jr. Hebrew. 


Sr. Past. The. 
Mid. Theol. 
Jr. Gk. Test. 

Sr. Ch Gov. 
Mid. Horn. 
Jr. Hebrew. 

Sr. Gk. Test. 
Mid Gk. Test. 
Jr. Bib. Intro 


Sr. Past. The. 
Mid. Theol. 




Jr. Gk. Test. 
Jr. He )rew. 




11:30 

P. M. 
2 


Sr. Ch Gov. 
Mid Horn. 
Jr. Hebrew. 

Sr. Gk. Test. 
Mid. Gk. Test. 










Jr. Bib. Int. 


3 












Mid.Chrs.Eth. 
Jr. Horn. 




Sr. Horn. 








Jr. Horn. 















OLD TESTAMENT===Professor Bissell. 

1. During 1892-3, and every second year, a course upon 
Old Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice a 
week for half the year. 

2. Junior Class. Hebrew begun. Recitation five times 
a week throughout the year. Textbook: Harper's Elements 
of Hebrew, Harper's Introductory Hebrew Method and 
Manua 1 . Special emphasis is laid upon the acquisition of a 
vocabulary. The inflection of the language and several hun- 
dred of the commonest words are memorized. There is daily 
drill in reciprocal oral translation and in writing Hebrew. 

3. Middle Class. Reading from the Historical Books 
twice a week throughout the year. Text book: Hebrew 
Bible, Harper's Hebrew Syntax, Driver's Hebrew Tenses. 
Special attention will be given to the Syntax, to enlarge the 
vocabulary and to rapid reading. For a part of the year the 
class will take English Bibles to the blackboard and, with 
these alone, write the Hebrew from memory. 



8 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

4. Senior Class. Reading: at sight from the Historical 
Books. Exegesis of Hebrew Prophecy and Poetry, twice a 
week throughout the year. 

5. During 1893-4, and every second year, such members 
of the Middle and Senior classes as are qualified for it, may 
make a beginning in Comparative Semitic Grammar by read- 
ing comparatively the first chapters of Genesis in Hebrew, 
Aramaic, Syriac and Arabic. 

NEW TESTAMENT--=Prof. Bissell. 

1. During 1893-4, and every second year, a course upon 
New Testament Introduction, Criticism and Theology, twice 
a week for half the year. 

2. a. Junior Class will read the remaining three gospels 
with reference to the Harmony, and, also, to the distinctive 
character of each of the four gospels, four times a week 
throughout the year. 

b. Middle Class will read Ephesians with Exegesis twice 
a week through the year. The other epistles of the captivity 
— Philippians, Colossians and Philemon— will be assigned for 
private reading. A summary of their contents will be con- 
sidered in the class room, and they will be required in the 
examination. 

c. Senior Class will read Romans with exegesis, twice a 
week through the year. The other epistles of the third Mis- 
sionary Journey, I Corinthians, II Corinthians and Galatians, 
will be assigned for private reading. Their scope and con- 
tents will be discussed in the school room, and they will be 
required in the examination. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY===Dr. Sanders. 

In this Department the purpose is to have each student 
read, during his course, some standard work on Systematic 
Theology, and in addition to this to read some authority on 
Theism. 

This course of reading will be made the subject of the 
most thorough examination and free discussion, and will be 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 9 

supplemented by every available means which are likely to 
encourage and stimulate the student in his search for truth, 
an I in preparation for its defence. 

Systematic Theology is begun in the second term of the 
Junior year and completed in the Senior year. The doctrines 
of Theology are presented didactically, historically and 
polemically. The order of topics pursued is: The nature, 
forms and sources of Theology; the being of God, His nature 
and attributes; the Trinity; the Divinity of Christ; the Holy 
Spirit; the decrees of God; creation; providence; miracles; 
the origin, nature and primitive state of man; the covenant 
with Adam; the fall; sin; imputation; original sin; inability; 
the covenant of grace; the person of Christ; His offices; the 
nature, necessity, perfection and extent of the atonement; 
His kingdom; His humiliation and exaltation; vocation- 
regeneration; faith; justification; sanctification; the law of 
God; eschatology; the sacraments. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Homiletics. — Prof. Jones. — The work of this Department 
is carried on throughout the Seminary course. In the Junior 
and Middle years, a text book on the " Preparation and 
Delivery of Sermons " is read. This is supplemented by 
exercises in the analysis of Sermons, and preaching before the 
Professors and students of the University weekly. 

In the Middle and Senior classes much attention is £iven 
to the preparation and criticism of Sermon plans and extem- 
pore preaching. 

Christian Evidence. — Dr. Hargrave. — By means of Text 
books and discussions the student is aided in verifying the 
Biblical proofs of doctrine and Christian truth as represented 
in the symbols of the Church, and he is thus trained to express 
with facility and clearness the revealed will of God. 

Pastoral Theology. — The treatment of this subject is con- 
fined to the third year of the course. It is designed that each 
student shall become thoroughly acquinted with the best 
method of applying the message of salvation to the hearts 



10 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

and lives of men. Lectures are driven, accompanied by use 
of text hook. 

The course includes the importance of ministerial piety, 
proper habits of study, skill and ability in the various 
branches of church work, the pastor's relation and duty to 
the various courts of the church, and the various private and 
public duties pertaining to his office. 

Church Government. — Dr. Sanders — Four lectures on the 
general subject are given to the Junior Cla-< 

In the Middle year the Form of Government with proof 
texts is taken up and pursued through one term, and a min 
ute comparison with other forms of church polity is made. 

In the Middle and Senior years, Dr Hodge's work, 
"What is Presbyterian Law?" and the Book of Discipline 
are used as text books, accompanied by lectures. 

BIBLICAL AND ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY==Prof. Jones. 

Since Sacred History is of vital importance as a part of a 
thorough Theological Education, the subject is pursued 
through the entire three year's course. 

Biblical History is studied by the Junior Class with the 
English version of the Old Testament as a text book, and 
Smith's Old Testament History as a guide, and is taught by 
lectures and constant reference to the typical and preparatory 
nature of the Old Testament. The connection between sacred 
and profane History is pointed out and attention is given to 
Archaeology, Geography and Chronology. 

Ecclesiastical History. — This subject is taken up by the 
Middle Class and is taught by lectures and with text book, 
covering the period from Apostolic times to the Reformation 
—16th Century. 

The Senior Class continues the subject from the Refor- 
mation to the present time, devoting the second term to the 
history of the Presbyterian Church in the United States. 

During each year a carefully prepared thesis having for 
its subject some leading personage, epoch, or phase, etc., 
of sacred history, is required from each student. 



Information* 



Admission. 



This school is open to young men of all denominations. 
Candidates for admission must produce evidence that they 
are members in good and regular standing in some evangeli- 
cal Church; that they possess competent talent, and that they 
have been regularly graduated at some College or University, 
or in some way they have received an equivalent for the 
training of a College course. Applicants for admission to an 
advanced standing must present a dismission from some 
other Theological Seminary, or be prepared for examination 
on the subjects which have been pursued by the class which 
they desire to enter. 

When a student who has been a member of any other 
Theological School seeks admission into this, he must pro- 
duce certificate of good standing and orderly dismission ere 
he can be received. 

Exceptional Cases. 

In exceptional cases, promising young men who have 
not had the benefit of a full College course will be received 
and will be allowed to pursue an eclectic course. 

Period of Study. 

The regular course of study, as in the other Seminaries 
of the Church, covers a period of three years. 

Practical Work. 

The practical work of the Ministry is joined with study, 
as the theological students have opportunities of laboring as 
supplies in the neighboring churches during vacation and 
in term time. 

"With the facilities at hand special and successful efforts 



12 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

are made to aid students in obtaining vacation employment 
along the lines of their future work as teachers and preachers 
among the people. 

Rules and Regulations. 

Except in a few particulars the students of the School 
of Theology are not subject to the rules and regulations 
which govern those of the other Schools of the University. 

Rooms. 

The rooms in Divinity Hall, so far as is necessary, are 
reserved for Theological Students. These rooms are fur- 
nished with a bedstead, mattress, pillows, bureau, washstand, 
chairs, looking-glass, etc., and are heated by steam. 

Expenses. 

There is no charge for tuition or room rent. ^Sf^There 
is a charge of 18.00 per month for board in connection with 
the Boarding Department where all the students living on 
the grounds are required to board. The fee of $8.00 per 
month covers also expenses of fuel, light, and washing of 
towels and bed clothing. 

The Examination. 

The next Annual Examination will be conducted during 
the last week in May. The examination will be oral and 
written. Each student is required to take this examination, 
and if by sickness or absence one fails to take it, he must 
submit to an examination with a corresponding class in a 
subsequent year. 

Prizes. 

The prize in Hebrew for the year ISOG-'OT was awarded 
to Thomas J. Smith of the Junior Class. 



Scbool of Hrte an& Sciences* 



Faculty of Arts. 

Rev. D. J. Sanders, D. D., 

President. 
Rev. A. U Frierson, D. D., 

Professor of Greek. 

Rev. Yorke Jones, D. D., 

Professor of English Literature, Rhetoric and History. 

Rev. W. M. Hargrave, D. D., 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science and the Evidences of 

Christianity. 

Prof. Geo. E. Davis, A. M , 

Professor of Natural Science and Latin. 

Prof. S. B. Pride, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Assistant in Latin. 

Rev. A. P. Bissell, D. D, Ph. D., 

Professor of Modern Languages. 



Courses, Degrees, and Terms of Admission. 

The School of Arts embraces two courses of study, the 
Classical and the Scientific. Students completing the Classi- 
cal Course satisfactorily receive the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts ; those completing the Scientific Course, that of Bach- 
elor of Science. Candidates for admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the studies prescribed in our Prepara- 
tory Course, or their equivalent in case of those coming from 
other schools. 

For advanced standing the candidate, in addition to the 
preparatory studies, will be examined in those previously 
studied by the class he wishes to enter, or others equivalent 
to them. 



Courses of Stu&?, 



The numerals in brackets indicate the number of weekly recitations. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Freshman Year. 



Mathematics. . . Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek.. ..XenophoiTs Anabasis, Rooks, I. II. Ill, IV [4] 

Greek Grammar, Goodwin [4] 

Latin Virgil, Greenough [4] 

Latin Allen and Greenough [4] 

History ... Myers [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [1] 

Sophomore Year — First Term. 

Mathematics. . . Geometry, Wentworth [2] 

Greek Homer, Iliad Books, I, II, III [4] 

Grammar Goodwin 

Latin Horace, Satires and Epktles... [4] 

Natural Science. Physics, Gage [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [2] 

Sophomore Year— Second Term. 

Mathematics .... Geometry, Wentworth [4] 

Greek Xenophon's Memorabilia [4] 

Grammar Goodwin 

Latin, Taeitus's Germania and Agricola [4] 

Natural Science. Physic?, Gage; Botany, Wood [3] 

Rhetoric [2] 



B1DDLE UNIVERSITY. 15 

Junior Year — First Term. 

Mathematics Plane Trigonometry and Ana'l Geom[3] 

Greek Plato, Apology and Crito [4] 

Gram ma a Goodwin : 

Natural Science .... Ast-'onomy, Young [4] 

Rhetoric Genung •. ... [2] 

German [2] 

Junior Year — Second Term. 

Mathematics Surveying [2] 

I Greek Text, Gospel of Mark . ) 

Greek •< Vocabulary of N. T. Words . >[4] 

( N. T. Grammar, (Buttmann) . ) 

Natukal Science Physical Geography, Maury [4] 

English Literature [2J 

Rudiments Psychol Steele [2] 

German [2 ) 

Senior Year— First Term. 

( New Testament. . . . Acts ) 

Greek < Grammar Goodwin r [1] 

( Vocabulary of N. T. Words . . . ) 

Natural Science. . .Chemistry, Williams [4] 

Political Economy [2] 

Logic Jevons, Hill . . [2J 

Mental Philosophy Haven, with Lectures : [1] 

English Literature [1] 

Evidences of Christianity . . Barrows [3] 

German [1] 

Senior Year — tfe&md Term. 

| 1 Acts Completed | 

r J Vocabulary of M. T. Words . . . m 

VtRLLK ! N. T. Grammar, (Buttmann) . f [JJ 

I New Testament J 

Zoology Steele [4] 

Civil Government . Thorpe [1[ 

Ethics Robinson [2] 

Mkntal Philosophy — Haven, with Lectures . .[1] 

Science and Religion — Frazer [3] 

German [2] 



1H BIDDLE UMVKK8ITY. 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Freshman Year. 
Mathematics. .Algebra and Geometry, Wentwortb... [4] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

History. Myers .... [3] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric .... [1] 

Sophomore Year — First Term. 

Mathematics. .. .Geometry, Wentwortb.. [2] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

Natural Science . Physics, Gage [3J 

Natural Science. . Physical Geography, Appletoirs. [4] 

Bible [1] 

Rhetoric [2] 

Sophomore Year Second Term. 

Mathematics Geometry, Wentwortb. [4] 

Greek or Latin [4] 

Natural Science. . Physics, Gage; Botany, Wood .[3] 

Bible . . [1] 

Rhetoric. . . . *. [2] 

Junior Year — First Term. 
Mathematics. . . .Trigonometry and Ana'l Geometry .... [3] 

Greek [4] 

Civil Government [4] 

Natural Science Astronomy, Young [4] 

German ,.[2] 

Junior Year — Second Term,. 

Mathematics Surveying [2] 

Greek .... [2] 

Natural Science. . Physical Geography, Maury [4] 

Knglish Literature . . . [1] 

Rudimentary Psychology Steele [2] 

German . [2] 

Senior Year— First Term. 
Natural Science Chemistry, Williams [4] 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



IT 



Political Economy [2] 

Logic Jevons, Hill [2] 

Mental Philosophy Haven, with Lectures [11 

English Literature [2] 

Evidences of Christianity [3] 

German [2] 

Senior Year — Second Term. 

Zoology Steele [4] 

Civil Government Thorpe [1] 

Ethics Robinson [2] 

Mental Philosophy Haven, with Lectures [1] 

Science and Religion Frazer f 3] 

German [2] 

Throughout the College Course there is a weekly recita- 
tion in the Bible, either in English or Greek. 

Stenography, Typewriting and Book-keeping are taught 
as electives. 

SCHEDULE. 

School of Arts and Sciences, First Term, Modified Some- 
what by Substitution in the Second Term, bat same Num- 
ber of Subjects. 



A.M. 
9 



10:15 



P.M. 

2 



Monday. 



Soph. Greek. 

Jr. Math 

Sr. Chem.... 

Fresh. Math. 
Soph. Phys.. 
Jr. German . 

Fresh. Bitfe 
Soph. LatL . 



Sr. Gr'k Test. 



Fresh. Hist. 
Soph. Bible 
Jr. Astron . . 
Sr. Logic . . . 



Fresh. Greek 



Tuesday. 



Soph. Greek. 

Jr. Math 

Sr. Chem.... 



Fresh. Math. 
Soph. Phys . 
Jr. German.. 



Fresh. Latin 
Soph. Latin. 
Jr. Greek.. . . 
Sr. Pol.Econ. 



Fresh. Hist. 



Sr. Logic 



Fresh. Greek. 
Sr. German . . 



Wednesday. 



Soph. Greek. 

Jr. Math 

Sr. Chem.... 



Fresh. Math. 
Soph. Phys.. 



Fresh. Latin 
Soph. Latin. 

Jr. Greek 

Sr. Pol.Econ. 



Jr. Astron. . . 
Soph. Rhet.. 



Fresh. Greek. 
Sr. Ev. Christ 



Thursday. 



Fresh. Math. 
Soph. Greek. 
Jr. Rhet 



Sr. Eng. Lit 
Soph. Math. 



Fresh. Latin 
Soph. Latin. 
Jr. Greek — 
Sr. Ment. Ph 

Fresh. Hist.. 

jr. Astron . . . 



Fresh. Greek. 
Sr. Ev. Christ 



Friday. 



Jr. Rhet. 
Sr. Chem. 



Soph. Math. 
Sr. Eng. Lit. 



Fresh. Latin. 
Jr. Greek. 



Fresh. Rhet. 
Jr. Astron. 



Sr. Ev.Christ. 
Soph. Rhet. 



18 BIDDLE UMVEKSITV. 

NATURAL SCIENCE—Prof. Davis. 
Outline. 

Physics — Five months 4 times a week. 

Botany — Three months 4 times a week. 

Physical Geography — Four months 4 times a week. 

Astronomy — Four months 4 times a week. 

Chemistry — Five months 4 times a week. 

Zoology — Three months 4 times a week. 

i. Physics. 

During the Sophomore year the folio wing topics, with 
others will be treated: Mathematical Physics, Molecular 
Physics, Hydrostatics, Pneumatics, the Kinetic Theory of 
Gases, Acoustics, Electricity and Magnetism, the Correla- 
tion and Conservation of Energy. 

Gage's Elements of Physics is used. 
2. Chemistry. 

Chemistry will be studied during the first live months of 
the Senior year. The work embraces the general treatment 
of Chemical Philosophy, Chemistry of the non-metals, the 
metals, organic Chemistry and Chemical Archaeology. 

The lectures on this subject will be illustrated by experi- 
ments and be followed by reviews and examinations during 
the course. Apparatus and re-agents sufficient for labora- 
tory works w T ill be furnished the students at a small cost. 

Williams' Introduction to Chemical Science will be used 
in connection with lectures. 

3. Astronomy. 

The second half of the Junior year is devoted to the 
study of Astronomy; embracing the elementary principles 
of mathematical and physical Astronomy, such as Parallax. 
Refraction, Latitude and Longitude, Precession. Nutation. 
Aberration, Theory of tides and lunar eclipses, and elements 
of a planet's orbit. 

Young's Elements of Astronomy is used. 
4. Botany. 

The subject of Botany is pursued during the last three 
months of the Sophomore year. The student is required to 



KIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



19 



gather specimens of fiowers and plants; to analyze and classify 
the same. An herbarium of thirty specimens is required. 

Wood's New Botanist and florist is used. 
5. Zoology. 

The last three months of the Senior year will be devoted 
to Zoology. Typical forms will be used to illustrate the 
subjects as they may be obtained in the locality. 

Steele's Fourteen weeks in Zoology is used as a text 
book. 

6. Physical Geography. 

This subject covers the first half of the Junior year. .It 
will be treated mainly by lectures. Maury's Geography will 
be used as a text book; but the student will have daily access 
to such books as Maury's Geography of the Sea, Foye's 
Child and Nature, Guyot's Earth and Man, Goldwaite's 
Geographical Magazine, Ritter's Comparative Geography, 
and similar books for collateral reading. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. === Prof. Davis. 

Harkness's Latin Grammar will be the standard of ref- 
erence throughout the course. 

Freshman Year: First and Second Terms — Virgil's iEneid, 
first four books. Second term, Juvenal's Satires. 

Sophomore Year: First and Second Terms — Satires and 
Epistles of Horace. Special attention will be given to scan- 
ning the metres of Horace. Lectures on Roman life, art and 
customs will occupy part of the last term. 
GREEK===Prof. Frierson. 

The course of study as outlined is intended or designed 
to lay for the ordinary student a foundation for the success- 
ful prosecution of the Greek language and literature. 

The Junior class will read from the New Testament one 
of the gospels. Recitations daily till completed. 

The Senior class will read "The Acts of the Apostles" 
with attention to the growth of the Apostolic church. Reci- 
tation twice per week throughout the school year. 

Examination required of each class. 



20 BIDDLE I MVKKSITY 

MODERN LANGUAGE. GERMAN===Prof. Bissell. 

The study of modern languages has been introduced, bat 
for the coming year only the German will he taught, in the 
Classical and Scientific courses, pursued by both Juniors and 
Seniors. 

MATHEMATICS===Prof. Pride. 

The required course in Mathematics comprises Plane and 
Solid Geometry, Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Plane Geometry. — The Freshmen begin with Plane Geom- 
etry (Wentworth's), in the study of which special attention is 
given to the exercises for original demonstration, and that a 
love for and interest in the science may be developed, a free 
discussion of the possibilities of each proposition is 
encouraged. 

Solid and Spherical Geometry. — This is the prescribed 
course for Sophomores, and in order that the students may 
have a proper notion for solid figures as graphically repre- 
sented on plane surfaces, they are encouraged to make their 
own models for illustrations. This is facilitated by the co-op- 
eration of the Industrial School. 

Trigonometry and Surveying. — The course for Juniors 
includes Trigonometry and Surveying with practical use of 
instruments. Special attention devoted to field work. 

HISTORY===Prof. Jones. 

The study of General History is carried through the 
Freshman year with text book and by lectures. On this 
subject there will be three recitations a week. This subject 
receives that careful and exhaustive attention which its impor- 
tance demands. 

PHILOSOPHY===Dr. Hargrave. 

Psychology. — Rudimentary Psychology is taught during 
the second term of the Junior year. 

Mental Science. — Mental Science is taught through the 
Senior year by the use of text books and lectures. 

Moral Science. — Moral Science is studied through the sec- 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 21 

ond term of the Senior year, and the students are instructed 
in the principles of the Theoretical and practical Ethics. 

Rational Philosophy, or Formal and Particular Logic. — Logic 
is studied so as to make the student familiar with Logical 
Terminology and forms, and with the laws of Discursive 
Thought. 

Civil Government. — Civil Government and the Constitution 
of the United States, and Political Economy, are studied in 
the Senior year, and each student is made acquainted with 
the government of the people of the United States, and 
American citizenship. 

Evidences of Christianity, Science and Religion, and Theism. — 
Instruction in these subjects is given by means of text books 
and class room discussions during the first term of the Senior 
year. 

Seniors. 

Earnest Caswell Byers Davidson. 

Lucius Billinger Cooper Sardinia, S. C. 

Thomas Ebbort Craig Waxhaw. 

Ludie Fielder Wellford, S. C. 

Taylor Jirardeau Frierson Sumter, S. C. 

Hugh Harry Winnsboro, S. C. 

William Lorenzo Hudson Stout's. 

John Moses Johnson Blackstock, S. C. 

Isaac McLaughlin Martin Mechanicsville, S. C. 

Samuel Isaac Moone Powers, S. C. 

William Randolph Muldrow Mayesville, S. C. 

Richard Edward Williams Goldsboro. 

—12— 
Juniors. 

Charles Edward Alexander Lodo. 

John Richard Baker Lincoln ton. 

William Robert Coles Aiken, S. C. 

John Addie Croom Goldsboro. 

Zander Adam Dockery Mangum. 

Chas. Newton Jenkins Wellford, S. C. 



22 RIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Samuel William James Camden, S. C 

Charles Berkley Johnson Greenville, S. ( J. 

George Alex. Morrow Greensboro. 

William Arthur Pethel Charlotte. 

George Richard Spaulding Rosindale. 

Lloyd Spaulding Rosindale. 

John Eli Walker Charlotte. 

—13— 

Sophomores. 

Charles Jeremiah Baker Grahamville, S. C. 

Herbert Bruce Grigg Biddle University. 

Walter Clarence Hargrave Lexington. 

John Moultrie Harleston Charleston, S. C. 

John David Howie Harrisburg. 

Joseph James Mason Keeling, Tenn. 

Edward Washington Murray Rembert, S. C. 

Jacob Thompson Charlotte. 

— 8— 
Freshmen. 

James Robert Barber Blackstock, S. C. 

Adam Daniel Bruen Beaufort, S. C . 

Walter Monroe Caldwell Huntersville. 

David Thomas Card well Charlotte. 

Harry Francis Cardoza Orangeburg, S. C. 

Miller Calhoun Cooper Mayesville, S. C. 

William Dubose Derita. 

Samuel Lee Fulwood Workman, S. C. 

William Bratton Gillard Ridgway, S. C. 

Charles Francis Green Macon, Ga. 

William Joseph Green Sumter, S. C. 

Elmer George Haskins Mebanes. 

John William Jamerson Martinsville, Va. 

James Rattray Scott Jeffrey Damerara, S. A. 

Walter Alexander Jenkins Steele Creek. 

Carey Willie Jones Mountville, S. C. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 23 

Ralph Eugene Jones McConnellsville, S. C. 

John Richard Logan Danville, Va. 

Charles Wendell Maxwell Sumter, S. C. 

Joseph Richard Pearson Walterboro, S. C. 

Henry Khuns Spearman Newberry, S. C. 

Waddie O'Hear Thompson Greenville, S. C. 

Thomas Robert Vanderhost Ridgway, S. C. 

Robert Alexander Walker Rock Hill, S. C. 

Columbus White Charlotte. 

William Sylvester Cain Wynne Rowland. 

James Edward Young Biddleville. 

—27— 
Total number in School of Arts and Sciences 60 



Unformatted 



Students of the School of Arts are subject to all the Rules 
and Regulations for the government of the students of the 
University, except that cadet duty and services in the School 
of Industries are optional. 

There are two regular examinations, one near the close 
of each of the two terms. The final grading of the Senior 
class is now based upon in part and made up after the second 
examination, which will be given six weeks earlier each year 
than the general examinations, from which time the class will 
be excused from recitations. 

The examinations are oral and written and the require- 
ments in connection therewith are absolute, except that a 
student may be conditioned for one term in not more than 
two studies, and the minimum general average for promotion 
to a higher class is 65, and any one falling below 55 in any 
three studies is required to repeat the year or is dropped from 
the school. 

Students are required to conform to the prescribed courses 
in every particular unless expressly excused by the Faculty. 

The discipline is impartial and firm, and all demerits 
arising from misconduct or infringement of the Rules and 
Regulations enter in and modify the grading, and when the 
number of demerits reaches 25 in any one term the delinquent 
is subject to suspension. 

Junior Prize Contest. 

Two gold medals, First and Second prizes, are offered 
for superior excellence in oratory by the Alumni Association, 
open to members of the Junior Class appointed by the Fac 
ulty. In the contest, June 1897, the first prize was won by 
R. E. Williams and the second by T. J. Frierson. 



preparatory anb IRormal School- 



FACULTY. 



Rev. D. J. Sandeks, D. D., 

President. 

* Rev. William F. Brooks, D. D. , 

Principal and Professor of English. 

Jas. D. Marten, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of Latin and English. 

Rev. P. G. Drayton, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of English. 

Rev. H. L. McCrorey, A. B., 
Assistant Professor. 

The Preparatory School aims to prepare the student thor- 
oughly for the studies of either course of the School of Arts. 
The Preparatory English Course is a necessity, as the large 
majority of the students coming to the Institution have not 
had the opportunity to ground themselves in the common 
English Branches. Upon completing the studies of this 
course the student is prepared to teach in the common schools 
of the State, as well as to enter the Freshman class. A cer- 
tificate will be given to each student completing this course. 

All applicants for admission to the lowest class of this 
course must be at least twelve years of age, must furnish sat- 
isfactory testimonials of good moral character, and must be 
able to pass a satisfactory examination in the Fourth Reader, 
Primary Geography and Went worth's Grammar School Arith- 
metic through Decimal and Common Fractions. To enter a 
higher class the applicant must pass an examination in the 
studies of the class next below it. 
* Deceased. 



2.6 BIDDLE IM\ KRSITV. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 
Third Class. 

Stickney's Fifth Reader, Frye's Complete Geography. 
Tar bell's Language Lessons No. 2, United States History 
(Montgomery's), Arithmetic to Stocks and Bonds, Spelling, 
Penmanship, Bible (Harper's Smith's Small History), His- 
tory of the Negro Race in America, Ethics for Young People 

(Everett's). 

Second Class. 

Latin First Latin Book, Tuell and Fowler. 

English Whitney & Lockwood's Grammar. 

Mathematics .Arithmetic and Algebra, Wentworth. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Spelling Once a week throughout the year. 

Dole's American Citizen. 

First Class. 

First Term. 

Latin Caesar. 

Grammar, Allen and Greenough. 

Greek White's First Greek Book. 

English Composition and Rhetoric, Genung's Outlines. 

Mathematics. Went worth's School Algebra. 
Physiology . .Blairdell's Our Bodies and How We Live. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Drawing Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

Second Term. 
Latin Csesar. 

Grammar, Allen & Greenough. 

Greek White's First Greek Book. 

Mathematics Wentworth 's School Algebra. 

English Composition and Rhetoric, Gegung's Outlines. 

Book Keeping.* 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Spelling Once a week throughout the year. 

Pedagogy . . Essentials of Method, DeGarmo. 

Drawing Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

* Extra. 



BTDDLE UNIVERSITY. 27 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

(The decision to adapt this course is made when the stu- 
dent enters the First Class.) 

Third Class. 

Stickney's Fifth Reader, Tarbell's Language Lessons No. 
2, United States History (^Montgomery's), Wentworth'sA rith- 
metic to Miscellaneous Examples at end, Spelling, Penman- 
ship, Bible (Harper's Smith's Small History). Tilden's 
Grammar School Geography, Exercises in Declamation. 

Second Class. 

Latin First Latin Book, Tuell and Fowler. 

English Whitney and Lockwood's Grammar. 

Mathematics Arithmetic and Algebra, Wentworth. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Penmanship and Spelling. Once a week throughout the year. 

First Class. 

Latin or Greek. First Latin Book, Tuell and Fowler. 

White's First Greek Book. 
Mathematics Algebra, Wentworth Completed. 

English Rhetoric and Composition, Genung's Outlines. 

Bible Weekly Lessons, Steele's Outlines. 

Natural Science Physiology, Blairdell's Our Bodies and 

How We Live. 

Spelling Once a week throughout the year. 

Pedagogy. Essentials of Method, DeGarmo. 

Drawing Thompson's Educational and Industrial. 

Book Keeping Gay's. 

Exercises throughout both years in Composition, Decla- 
mation and Vocal Music. 

Every student in the Preparatory and Normal School is 
required to take a trade in the School of Industries. 



28 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



SCHEDULE. 

Preparatory and Normal School. 





First Class. 


Second Class. 


Third Class. 


A.M. 
9:00 

10;15 


Bible, Mon 

Latin, Csesar, 4 das 


Write and Spell, Mon... 
Arithmetic, 4 das 


Geography, Mon. 
Indust. Dept., 4 das. 






Eng. Gram., 4 das 

Indust. Dept., 4 das 

Civil Gov't., Fri 


Ethics for Y. Peo..+ Fri. 

Geography, Tues. 
Lang, and Gram., 4 das. 

Bible, Mon. 


11:30 
P.M. 


Rhetoric, Outlines, 3 ds. 
Physiol., Th. and Fri . . . 


2:00 


Drawing*, Fri 




1 . -.History, 3 das. 
Geography, Fri. 

Write and Spell, 2 da.s. 
Reading, 2 das. 






3:00 


Indust. Dept., 4 days . . . 
Music and Declam., Fri. 






Music and Declam., Fri 











Bookkeeping extra. 



+ Negro History, 2d Term. 



First Class. 



James Lee Black Hopewell. 

Edward B. Brooks Biddle L T niversity. 

William Henry Bryant Salisbury. 

James Arthur Byers Greensboro. 

William Cantey Charlotte. 

Henry George Cornwell Charlotte. 

Julius Lorenzo Foster Anderson, S. C. 

Handsome Alexander Fox Sandif er. 

Earnest Ciayborne Grigg Biddle University. 

Mack James Hardy Spartanburg, S. C. 

James Seabrum Harris Harrisburg. 

William Handy Jackson Goldsboro. 

Richard Hamilton Jefferson Athens, Ga. 

Thomas Edward Jones Charlotte. 

Italy LeConte Thebes, Ga. 

John Thomas Lyons Mocksville. 

Winbush Lucius McBeth Charlotte. 

John Martin Miller Sharon, S. C. 

Milton Lee Miller Sardinia, S. C 

Edward Alexander Murdock Statesville. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 29 

Harvey Lee Murphy Statesville. 

Peter Eli Palmer Ridgway, S. C. 

Walter Lewis Patterson Huntersville. 

John Wesley Perry Charlotte. 

Robert Nathaniel Perry .Charlotte. 

George Henry Pettie Martinsville, Va. 

Robert Holston Price Camden, S. C. 

Alfred Nathan Samuels Gr. Hill, Jam., W. I. 

John Thomas Sanders Charlotte. 

B. F. Spearman Newberry, S. C. 

Moses Spears Harrisburg. 

Maurice Taylor Smith Wilmington. 

John Primus Tinnen Charlotte. 

John Calvin Valentine Due West, S. C. 

Odie Green Walker Charlotte. 

Sidney Johnson Wentz Cobourn's Store. 

Napoleon Lewis Wyche Charlotte. 

—37— 

Second Class. 

John Wesley Anderson Scarboro, S. C. 

James T. Bailey Lillington. 

John Nealy Barber Blackstocks, S. C. 

Robert Sanford Baucum Newbern. 

John Henry Blake Nesbitt, S. C. 

John N. Brown . .- Portsmouth, Va. 

James Baxter Caldwell Harrisburg. 

Willie Alexander Foster Cleveland . . Charlotte. 

Lewis Benjamin Cook Fernandina, Fla. 

Henderson Crawford Cluster. 

John Ratley Crawford Mocksville. 

Leonard Marshall Crawford Smith's Turnout, S. C 

Henry Hugh Davis Shamrock. 

William Calup DeBerry Mt. Gilead. 

William Andrew Field Weldon. 

Daniel Webster Fisher Sardis. 

John Tazwell Fisher Greenville, S. C. 



30 BIDDLE iM\KRsrrv. 

James William Fulwood Workman, S. C. 

Webster Alexander Gaston Caldwell Station. 

Charles Gandy Mt. Clare, S. C. 

Joseph Norwood Gibbe Scott's Hill. 

Albert McCoy Green Sumter, S. C. 

Samuel Rice Grissom Uncus. 

Major Baxter Harry Sand if er. 

William Charles Harris Salisbury. 

Thomas Samuel Horn Long Pine. 

Oscar Joseph Jackson Charlotte. 

Reuben Joseph James Columbia. S. C. 

Joseph Augustus Jeffries Smithville, Va. 

William Edward Key Baltimore, Md. 

Edmond Lowrey Elrod. 

William Henry Loyd Keeling, Tenn. 

John Lee Wastel Lyttle Eastfield. 

Ulysses Stephen Matoon Maxwell. . .Hood's. 

Joseph Miles McLean Shopton. 

Alexander Miller Kershaw, S. C. 

Edward M. Trever Murray Mooresville. 

Warren James Nedd Mayesville, S. C 

James Adam Noble Salisbury. 

James Edward Phifer Charlotte. 

Samuel Mack Russell Sardis. 

Robert Henry Simmons Charlotte. 

William Mattock Simonds Matthews. 

Joseph Simonds Matthews. 

Dallas Wilson Smith Charlotte. 

Edward Springs Fort Mill, S. C. 

John Ferdinand Tentee Aiken, S. C. 

Roderick Todd Philadelphia, Pa. 

John Andrew Torrance Lodo. 

Harvey Ward Beecher Van Buren . . . Sumter, S. C. 

Andrew Wallace Sardis. 

Charles Alexander Ward Lincolnton. 

George Washington Wilson Due West, S. C. 

Samuel Withers Shopton. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 31 

William Robert Young Biddleville. 

— 55 — 
Third Class. 

Richard Alexander Biddleville. 

Charles Archie Smith's Turnout, S. C. 

William Hiram Baker Lincolnton. 

Samuel Eugene Boger Concord. 

Clarence Boulware Charlotte. 

Charles Samuel Brooks Biddle University. 

Willie Francis Brooks Biddle University. 

A. L. Cardwell Charlotte. 

Edward James Cardwell Charlotte. 

John Sanders Craig Waxhaw. 

Burett Feimster Biddle University. 

William Arthur Feimster Biddle University. 

George Washington Goode Charlotte. 

Benjamin Monroe Grant Darien, Ga. 

Samuel Henry Grier Rock Hill, S. C. 

Jerry Gage Harris Tulin. 

James E. Hunter Charlotte. 

James Lawrence Hill Walterboro, S. C. 

Benjamin Hudson Davenport. 

John Kollock Kollock Station, S. C. 

Solomon Lowrey Goodwill, S. C. 

Julius Clayton Lyttle Eastfield. 

Earnest McAuley Huntersville. 

John Henry Alexander McNeely Charlotte. 

Virgil McPherson Booneville. 

Arthur Rudolph Moore Charlotte. 

John W. Moore Pineville. 

Henry Monroe Moser Davenport. 

John William Marshall Neal Shopton. 

Gibson Peeler Biddleville. 

Lester Peoples Charlotte. 

Richard J. Perkins Kershaw, S. C. 

Robert Belton Perry Monroe. 



32 BIDDLE INIVKKSITY. 

Richard Pickenpack Charlotte. 

William Rice Gastonia. 

Daniel Jackson Sanders, Jr Biddle University. 

Clarence Shaw Huntersville. 

Willie Lee Sheppard Charlotte. 

Robert Alexander Smith Shopton. 

David Patrick Spaulding Rosindale 

Robert Henry Tyson Lodo. 

Junius Walker Charlotte. 

C. Gr. Washington Jacksonboro, S. C 

Tinsley Alexander White Sardis. 

Joseph Berry Whitted Hillsboro. 

Eugene Woods Mebane. 

—46— 



Scbool of flnJmetriee- 

H. A. HUNT, Superintendent. 



All students in the Preparatory Course are required to 
take some trade, and report every day for work in the Indus- 
trial School. 

At present six trades are being taught — Carpentering, 
Printing, Bricklaying, Plastering, Tailoring and Shoemak- 
ing. Each student is allowed to have his choice of trades 
being taught, but no change will be allowed after the choice 
is once made. One-sixth of the time in recitation hours is 
devoted to industrial training. 

WOOD WORK===H. A. Hunt, Foreman. 

Carpentry and Joinery are taught in a room provided 
with twelve cabinet benches, each of which is fitted up with 
a set of carpenter's tools. 

Students are taught the use and care of these tools, the 
principles of wood working — from drawings and models — 
and have also such practical ^instruction as can be had from 
improvements and repairs of the buildings and furniture of 
the University. 

Besides doing the necessary work for the school a limited 
amount of work is done for outside parties. Two Profes- 
sors' houses have been built by the students, also a boiler 
house ; and extensive repairs have been made on other build- 
ings. 

THE PRINTING OFFICE===Wm. E. Hill, Foreman. 

This office is equipped as any regular, first-class printing 
establishment would be. Besides the ordinary office furni- 
ture it has three first-class printing presses. 

In this office the Africo- American Presbyterian and the 



34 Bft>DLE LM\ KJi.SITY. 

Biddle University Record are set up and printed, and job work 
is done, thus giving the students actual printing office 
instruction and practice, both in type-setting and preswork. 
The office is amply equipped tor doing excellent work, and 
the instruction is thorough and practical. 
THE SHOE SHOP. 

The shoe shop is fitted up with twelve shoemaker- 
benches, each of which is provided with a set of tools. Stu- 
dents are taught the use and care of these tools, and such as 
is done in a regular shoe shop — sewing, pegging, nailing, 
cementing, patching, half-soling, fitting, lasting and putting 
together new work. 

By doing all the work for the students and professors 
ample opportunity is given for making this branch of work 
thoroughly practical. 
MASONRY AND PLASTERING===R. A. Walker, Foreman. 

These two trades have been introduced and instruction in 
them is being given daily with very satisfactory results. 
These branches are putting a goodly number in possession of 
skill that will command work and good pay. 

It is proposed to further enlarge this department by 
adding Tailoring and Blacksmithing, also to organize a 
branch of agriculture. 

TAlLORING===R. H. Jefferson, Foreman. 

The room for this branch of industry is provided with 
all necessary facilities for teaching and learning this impor- 
tant trade. Cleaning, pressing, hand and machine sewing, 
repairing and making new work are done, and the various 
elementary principles of the trade are taught. The advanced 
students are taught cutting and fitting. 

Number of Students in Carpentry 22 

Number of Students in Printing 26 

Number of Students in Shoemaking 9 

Number of Students in Brickwork 3 



BIDDLE UNIVERSli T. 35 

Number of Students m Plastering 7 

Number of Students in Drawing — 

Number of Students in Tailoring , 18 

Total 85 



Summary 

School of Theology. 

Senior Class 5 

Middle Class 8 

Junior Class 3—16 

School of Arts and Sciences. 

Senior Class 12 

Junior Class 12 

Sophomore Class 8 

Freshman Class 27—59 

The Preparatory and Normal School. 

First Class 37 

Second Class 55 

Third Class 46-138 

Total Enrollment 213 

The School of Industries. 

In the Five Trades 138 

Total 351 

Counted Twice 138 

Total Enrollment 213 



Gbe Ibome department. 

H. A. HUNT, Superintendent. 



Tnis department includes the orderly keeping of the 
grounds, the supervision of the dormitories and the public 
buildings, and all that pertains to the immediate manage- 
ment of the students as to board and home life. 

The Superintendent and his family live among the stu- 
dents and give to them such care and attention as they would 
receive in a well organized Christian home. 

Except the day students, all are required to live in this 
department. 

The cost of living is eight dollars ($8.00) per month, 
payable two months in advance, which includes boarding, 
furnished rooms, light, fuel and washing, except wearing 
apparel. This can be had at one dollar per month. 

Boarders are not received for less than one month, and 
no deduction can be made for absence unless ordered by the 
Faculty. 



(Seneral Information* 



The School Year consists of one session of two terms, 
commencing on the first Wednesday of October and closing 
on the first Wednesday of June. Students wishing to enter 
should make early application. The best interests of the 
Institution and of the student require that he report himself 
for duty promptly at the opening of each term. 

Tuition. 

There is no charge for tuition, except in the case of local 
students, who are charged $4 per session. 

Literary Societies. 

There are four flourishing literary societies — the Mat- 
toon, the Clariosophic, the Johnson and the Douglass. The 
exercises consist of composition, discussion and debate, and 
there is a Moot Court connected with them. Those societies 
are governed by laws enacted by themselves, and their offi- 
cers are also elected by themselves. The students are 
required each to become a member of one of these societies 
and to attend upon the exercises. The whole is under the 
supervision of the Faculty. 

The Library and Reading Room. 

A large, airy room on the first floor of the main building 
has been set apart as Library and a similar one on the third 
floor as a Reading Room. 

The former contains about 8,500 volumes of commenta- 
ries and religious literature, and also a variety of the works 
of standard authors. About 2,000 volumes, consisting 
chiefly of the w 'Billingsley Library," and 200 pamphlets 
have been added during the year. 

The latter is well supplied with many of the best 
religious and secular weekly and daily papers. 



38 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

The students have frequent access to Library and Read- 
ing Room under special regulations. 

College Y. M. C. A. 

A college branch of the Y. M. C. A. is in successful 
operation, with a membership of over 100. It is earnestly 
desired that all the students identify themselves with this 
noble work. 

Pecuniary Aid. 

Condidates for the ministry and young men of promise 
will receive such aid as their necessities and the resources at 
command will allow. Friends in Scotland have established a 
fund of over $6,000, the interest of which is to be used to aid 
young men preparing for mission work in Africa. 

ISlHShould any beneficiary of these funds marry before 
completing his course of study, thereupon his aid shall be 
forfeited, nor will any one be aided who uses tobacco in any 
form. 

Location and Design in the Establishment of the 
Institution. 

The University is located at Charlotte, North Carolina, 
and is named in memory of the late Major Henry J. Biddle, 
of Philadelphia, whose widow, Mrs. Mary D. Biddle, has 
been one of its most liberal supporters. It is chartered by 
the Legislature of the State and is under the auspices of the 
Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. 

The object of the Institution is the education of colored 
teachers and preachers, and leaders for the race in other 
walks of life. 

It stands at the terminus of seven railroads, in the midst 
of a dense and comparatively intelligent colored population, 
and occupies a site of sixty acres in the suburbs of the city. 

It is situated in the heart of the South Atlantic region, 
which contains the two Synods of Atlantic and Catawba, 
having 320 colored churches, 180 ministers, scores of young 
men in preparation for the ministry, with a large number of 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 39 

schools and academies under their care. These schools and 
churches must be furnished with intelligent Christian teach- 
ers and preachers, who must be largely educated on the field, 
and in contact with the people among whom they are to 
labor. Such a training is given here at less expense than it 
could be elsewhere; the student has the best opportunities 
for a liberal education together with the refining influence of 
a Christian home, and he is kept at the same time in contact 
and sympathy with the people. 

Scholarships and Regulations Pertaining Thereto. 

In order to hold any Scholarship in Biddle University, it 
is necessary that the student be in attendance throughout the 
scholastic year, unless excused by the proper authority, and 
a scholarship may be forfeited by any violation of the regu- 
lations for the government of the students. 

Under no circumstances whatever will more than one 
scholarship at the disposal of the University be available for 
a student at any one time. 

Scholarships shall be classified as follows: 

CLASS A. 

No. 1, $64.00 Annually for Three Years. 
No. 2, $64.00 Annually for Two Years. 
No. 3, $64.00 Annually for One Year. 

CLASS B. 

No, 1, $75.00, Seniors in the School of Arts and Sciences. 
No. 2, $65.00, Juniors in the School of Arts and Sciences. 
No. 3, $40.00, Sophomores in the School of Arts and Sciences. 

• CLASS C. 

Supplementary support varying according to actual 
needs, determined in each case by the Faculty. 

CLASS D. 

These Scholarships are drawn from the " African Schol- 
arship Fund," and are subject to the recommendation of the 
Faculty, solely for the support of candidates for missionary 
work in Africa. 



40 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Scholarships in Class "A " are open to candidates for 
Freshman Class who attain a general average of 85 per 
cent, without conditions, which must be sustained or the 
scholarship will be forfeited. 

Scholarships in Class "B" are open to Seniors, Juniors, 
and Sophomores who attain a general average of 85 per cent, 
without conditions, which must be sustained or the scholar- 
ship will be forfeited. 

Regulations Pertaining to Degrees. 

All degrees are conferred by the Board of Trustees on 
recommendation of the Faculty. 

1. On completing the regularly prescribed Classical 
Course each candidate may receive the degree of A. B. 

% On completing the regularly prescribed Scientific 
Course each candidate may receive the degree of B. S. 

3. On completing the regularly prescribed Course in the 
School of Theology, with a minimum general average of 85 
per cent. , each candidate may receive the degree of S. T. B. 

4. It being inexpedient, Biddle University will not grant 
the same degrees as honorary as it grants in the regular 
course on examination. 

5. That in every case the reason for bestowing an 
honorary degree shall be openly avowed and publicly stated 
in the commencement program. 

6. The Master's degree will not be granted except for 
post-graduate study of at least one year's duration, tested by 
adequate examinations in a prescribed course. 

7. The minimum requirements for the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy, Doctor of Science, and Doctor, of Pedagogy 
shall be as follows: 

(a) The previous attainment of a Bachelor's degree or its 
equivalent. 

(b) The completion of two years of post-graduate study, 
not more than one year, however, of actual residence in the 
Institution shall be required, but that must be the final year. 

(c) Adequate examinations — one at the close of each scho- 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 41 

lastic year, and a thesis embodying the results of original 
research at the close of the second year, the thesis to bear 
the written acceptance of the professor in charge of the 
major subject, accompanied by a short biography of the 
candidate. 

8. The following shall be recognized as honorary 
degrees: D. D. and LL. D. 



Mante of tbe Institution. 



First. In the language of a Secretary of the Freedmen's 
Board, "Permanent Endowment Funds for the adequate 
support of the Professors is an imperative necessity." Five 
thousand dollars ($5,000) have been secured for the Presi- 
dent's chair. 

Second. Scholarships: The establishment of which shall 
yield $100 each per annum, to enable needy and promising 
students in the higher departments to pursue their studies, 
continuously, through the college year, and in addition to 
this a few hundred dollars annually, to be placed in the 
hands of the Faculty, to be used at its discretion, in aiding 
needy and worthy students, is a great desideratum. 

Third. Donations of Clothing, for distribution among 
needy students, are earnestly solicited. 

Fourth. Useful books for the Library are much needed, 
works of reference, biography, history and science. A 
Library Fund is much needed, that purchases may be made 
from time to time of new and useful books. 

Fifth. Five thousand dollars to aid in enlarging and im- 
proving the School of Industries. 



Conclusion* 



No institution in the care of the Presbyterian Church 
has a wider field or greater opportunities. Its students are 
gathered from all the South Atlantic and other States, and 
are scattered in their school and church work through all 
this vast region, and as far west as Texas. 

The Institution is consecrated to the glory of God and 
the welfare of a needy race. It is the only institution of its 
kind maintained by our Presbyterian Church in the South; 
and it certainly is one of the most important agencies in the 
hands of the Church for the accomplishment of good among 
eight millions of Afro- Americans. It commends itself to 
the prayers and gifts of all good men. 

The importance in the eyes of the Church, of the inter- 
ests which Biddle University represents, is forcibly put in 
the language of a recent circular addressed to churches on its 
behalf by the Board of Missions for Freedmen : 

"What is done," say they, u for Biddle University, will, 
in a great measure, determine the success of our whole work 
among the Freedmen." 

"Indifference to the Biddle University is indifference to 
our whole work among the Freedmen. If liberally sup- 
ported, no missionary undertaking will return speedier and 
more abundant fruit. Where are the men and women who 
will build up this Institution for the glory of God and the 
good of a needy race ?" 

The Presbyterian Journal says: 

"Aiming to do a thorough work of education, there can 
be no question that it (Biddle University) is already doing a 
great work with the promise of still greater results here- 
after." 



44 BIDDLE UNIVJ«:iiSITY. 

Rev. E. P. Cowan, D. D., Corresponding Secretary of 
the Board of Missions for Freedmen, says: 

"The best argument in favor of Biddle University as a1 
present organized, is the good condition in which it now is. 
and the good work that is now being done. This can be 
seen by any one who will take the time and trouble to visit 
the place and examine for himself. 

"The order and decorum of the students is remarkable. 
The rules are stringent and obeyed. The buildings are well 
kept. 

"The Industrial Department is better organized and 
more efficient than it ever was before in the history of the 
Institution. Professor Hunt, a graduate of Atlanta Univer- 
sity, is a practical carpenter. 

"Look into the shoe shop and you find a dozen young 
men (the room will hold no more) who an hour before were 
reading Greek and Latin; now they are sitting on cobbler's 
benches and are driving wooden pegs. In the next room a 
dozen or more are setting type, while two others are turning 
a large printing press, and a third man is 'feeding' the ma- 
chine. 

"I visited every class room in the Institution, and 
found the instructor able to instruct; the learner able 
to learn. I devoutly wish every friend of the work 
could visit the school. If this were possible, the University 
would have all the money it needs. Its professors are workmen 
that need not be ashamed. Their work suffers most from not 
being known, or clearly understood. The institution is now 
running up to its utmost capacity as regards numbers. 

"If the University only had the necessary scholarships, 
the roll would easily run up to 500. 

"We have come to the point where the Presbyterian 
Church, in its work among the Freedmen, must decide wheth- 
er it is going to have a large, strong, first-class University 
or not. Here is our opportunity. It is a grand one. If we 
seize, it future generations will say, 'How wise !' If we neg- 
lect it, they will say, 'How foolish !'" 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 45 

In the Church at Home and Abroad, Rev. Edward B. 
Hodge, D. D., Corresponding Secretary of the Board 
of Education of the Presbyterian Church, says: 
"A recent visit to Charlotte, North Carolina, enabled 
the Secretary to make something of an inspection of the 
working of Biddle University. The situation of the 
Institution is most delightful, commanding a wide view of the 
surrounding country. It is sufficiently far from town for 
the purpose of academic seclusion, and yet near enough for 
all purposes of convenience. President Sanders presides 
over the institution with ability and skill to a degree that 
commends him to the favorable comments of such intelli- 
gent observers as the pastors of the Presbyterian Churches 
in Charlotte. It is very gratifying to find with what inter- 
est they are regarding our work among the colored people. 
It is delightful to find what an eagerness for learning the 
students display, and, in many cases, a very decided apti- 
tude. The order and discipline of the University is excel- 
lent." 

In proof of the estimation in which it is held by prom- 
nent Southern men, see the following: 

From Dr. E. Nye Hutchinson: 

"It is my earnest prayer that some liberal Presbyterian 
may fully endow Biddle University, and make it not only 
useful to its generation at home, but a blessing to the 
world." 

Pittsburgh, Pa., April 21, 1898. 
I spent about two weeks at Biddle a year ago and made 
a careful examination of all its methods. I am fully pur- 
suaded that the academic work in this Institution is as well 
done as in our best Northern Colleges and that the discip- 
line of the Institution is better than in most of them. 

David R. Breed. 



IRulee Hn& IReQulations 



1. No one under twelve years of age will be admitted to 
the school. Applicants who are strangers to the faculty 
must bring a satisfactory certificate of good character, and 
steady industrious habits. Every student, by his enroll- 
ment, contracts to obey the regulations of the University. 

2. Students are expected at all times to act with 
respect and courtesy toward their instructors and fellow stu- 
dents, and observe cleanliness and neatness in person, cloth- 
ing and room; 

3. All students, except day scholars, are required to 
attend chapel exercises each morning except Saturday. 

4. In order to preserve health, cultivate manual skill, 
develop taste, and at the same time keep the buildings in 
order, and improve and beautify the grounds, all students 
except day scholars are expected to work one hour each day. 

5. Students from abroad are required to board in the 
home unless excused by the faculty; and when so excused 
shall be regarded as day scholars and shall pay $3.00 per 
term. Board, including furnished room, light, fuel and 
washing of bed clothes, is $8.00 per calendar month — pay- 
ment two months in advance. Any student, who, without 
satisfactory arrangement, shall not pay within ten days from 
the first of the month, shall forfeit the privileges of the 
the institution. 

6. Day pupils must pay their dues, $4.00 per term, at 
the beginning of each term, and while on the grounds be 
subject to all the rules of the institution. 

7. Punctuality and diligence in regard to all duties 
and exercises are required. 

8. During the time set apart for study, students will 
remain in their rooms or in such places as may be designated 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 47 

for study. Talking, loud studying, or visiting from room 
to room during study hours, and boisterous, rude conduct in 
any of the buildings at any time are prohibited. All stu- 
dents are expected to be in their rooms and quiet between 
10 p. m. and 6 a. m. All lights out at 10:30 p. m. 

9. Low, vulgar or profane language, the use of ardent 
spirits, wine or beer, tobacco in any form, keeping or hand- 
ling of pistols, and all games of chance are prohibited. 

10. Students are forbidden to mark or deface in any 
way the buildings or furniture, or to throw slops, waste 
water, paper, or anything that would cause a nuisance, from 
the windows or about the grounds. Any damage done by 
wantonness or carelessness must be paid for by the person 
doing the same. 

11. Students are forbidden to entertain other students, 
their friends, or strangers in their rooms over night. Stu- 
dents having friends for whom they desire either meals or 
lodging will report to the Superintendent. 

12. The students are forbidden to hold any public 
meetings on the premises of the University for any purpose 
whatever without special permission from the President. 

13. The students are forbidden to give entertainments 
of any character and invite guests without special permis- 
sion. 

14. Students are allowed to attend church in Charlotte 
on Sabbath afternoon; but no one will be permitted to leave 
the grounds at other times without special permission. 

15. A monitor shall be appointed for each floor or 
building who shall report any neglect or disordet. 

16. Violation of the rules will subject the offender to 
discipline. 






48 



KIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 



TIME TABLE. 



6:00 A 


M 


—Rising Boll. 






6:45 




—Warning Bell. 






7:00 


' 


—Breakfast. 






8 :25 


' 


—Cadet Inspectio] 




8:80 


• 


—Chapel Warni 


)^ r 


Bell. 


8:40 


' 


—Chapel Bell. 






8:45 ' 


' 


—Gong— Doors 


Closet 


9 00 
10:16 




—1st Recitation 
—2d Recitation 


:! 


Bell fifteen 
minutes 
hefore. 


11 :80 ' 
12:30 P. 


M 


-3d Recitation 
—Close. 


■/ 



12:40 P. M.- Dinner. 

2:00 " —Gong— 1st Bee. I 

;j : ,X) *' —Gong— 3d Bee. \ 

4:oo •• —Gong— Close. \ 

5:00 " -Cadet Drill. 

6:00 •« —Supper. 

7:00 " —Study Hours Bell. 

10:00 " —Close Study Hour. 

10:80 " —Lights Out Bell. 



Belli 

minutes 
before. 



STUDY HOURS. 



MONDAY From 7:00 to 10:00 1'. M. 

TUESDAY From 7 :00 to 10 :00 P. M. 

WEDNESDAY. From 7:00 to 10:00 P. M. 



THURSDAY From 7:00 to 10:00 P. If. 

FRIDAY From 7 :00 to 10 :00 P. M. 

SATURDAY From 9:00 to 12:00 P. M. 



MEETINGS. 

SUNDAY 8:30 A. M.. Warning S. S. Bell. I SUNDAY 7:30 P. M.. Ch. Warning Bell. 
SUNDAY 8:40 A.M., S.S.Bell. SUNDAY 7:50 P. M., Church Bell. 

SUNDAY 8:45 A. M., Gong. | SUNDAY 8:00 P. M., Church Gong. 

TUESDAY 6:30 P. M., Student's Prayer-meeting. 

THURSDAY 6:30 P. M., Y. M. C. A. Meeting. 

FRIDAY 7:00 to 10:00 P. M., Societies. 



Each student on entering the University is required to 
sign the following: 

Z A. B., now entering Biddle University as a student, do sol- 
emnly promise to obey all the rules and regulations for the govern- 
ment of students, as long as I remain a member thereof 

(Signed.) A. B. 



innivereit^ Calen&ar* 



1898. 

Friday, May 27, 8:30 p. in. Preparatory closing exercises. 
Annual Address, Normal and Preparatory School, by 
Rev. N. N. Gregg, A. B., Lancaster, S. C. 

Sunday, May 29, 3 p. m. Baccalaureate Sermon by Rev. D. 
J. Sanders, D. D. 

Monday, May 30, 8:30 p. m. Junior Prize Contest. 

Tuesday, May 31, 8:30 p. m. Address before the Alumni, by 
Rev. A, J. Tate, A. B., of Greensboro, N. C. 

Wednesday, June 1, 10:30 a. m. Commencement Exercises. 
At 3 p. m. , awarding diplomas and prizes and announc- 
ing degrees. Addresses by noted guests. 

Tuesday, Oct. 4, 3 p. in. Examination of applicants for 
admission begins. 

Wednesday, Oct. 5. First Term begins. 

Thanksgiving — The last Thursday of November. 

1899. 

Thursday, Jan. 26. Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

Wednesday, Feb. 1. Second Term begins. 

Friday, Feb. 24. Joint Exhibition of the Literary Societies 
of the Preparatory and Normal Schools. 

Friday, March 31. Joint Exhibition of the Literary Societies 
of the School of Arts and Sciences. 

Wednesday, June 2. Commencement. 

Holidays. 

1. Christmas Day. 

2. Emancipation Day. 



lectures i£xtraovMnar$. 



The following persons gave each a special lecture to the 
University in the Second Term: 

Mrs. F. E. W. Harper, of Philadelphia. Pa. 

Rev. J. W. Stagg, Pastor of the Second Presbyterian 
church, Charlotte. 

Rev. W. R. Howerton, D. D., Pastor of the First Pres- 
byterian church, Charlotte. 

Rev. W. G. Hubbard, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. J. T. Chalmers, Pastor of the Associate Reformed 
Presbyterian church, Charlotte. 

Rev. J. W. Smith, D. D., Editor of the Star of Zion. 

Rev. R. P. Wyche, D. D., Pastor of the Seventh Street 
Presbyterian church, Charlotte. 

Rev. A. F. Graham, Pastor of the Church Street Pres- 
byterian church, Charlotte. 



affiliates Schools of Bi&Me ^Tlnivereit^. 



Richard Allen Institute, Pine Bluff, Ark. 

FACULTY 1897-98. 
President — Rev. Lewis Johnson. 
Principal — Mrs. M. A. Johnson. 

Mrs. Jennie B. Childress 

Miss Jennie Jones. 

Miss Sophia H. Dunton. 

A. L. Williams. 

Lewis H. Johnson, Jr. 

TUTORS. 

T. W. Daniels. 

Miss Mattie Young. 
Miss Eliza Watts. 
Miss Mary La Font. 
David Mays. 
Total enrollment for the present school year 224. 

Ferguson Academy, Abbeville, S. C. 

FACULTY 1897-98. 
Principal — Rev. Thos. H. Amos, A. M. 

Prof. Jos. G. Lee. 

Prof. H. H. Cardwell, B. S. 

Mrs. T. H. Amos. 

Mrs. E. A. Pindle. 

Miss E. C. Bomar. 
Total enrollment of students for the present school year 287. 

Harbison Institute, Beaufort, S» C. 

FACULTY 1897-98. 
Principal— Rev. G. M. Elliott, D. D. 
Assistant Principal — W. H. Stinson, A. B. 



52 BIDDLE I'NIVKKSITY. 

Miss Jennie E. Gooche. 
Miss Ionia B. Hext. 
Miss Hattie I. Brabam. 
Total enrollment of students for the present school year i y '.''.'. 
Immanuel Training and High School, Aiken, S. C. 
FACULTY 1897-98. 
Principal — Rev. W. R. Coles. 
Assistant Principal — W. C. Coles, A. B. 
Rev. W H Mitchell. 
T. J. Coles, A. B. 
Miss M. C. Scott. 
Miss L. M. Cram. 
Miss I. D. James. 
Sewing and Music — Mrs. R. E. Coles. 

Students enrolled for the school year 175. 

Dayton Academy, Carthage, N. C. 
FACULTY 1897-98 
Principal — Rev. Henry D. Wood, A. B. 
Mrs. A. M. Wood. 
Mrs. M. L. Tyson. 
Number of students for the present year 175. 
Brainerd Institute, Chester, S. C. 
FACULTY 1897-98. 
Academic and Normal Department. 
Jno. S. Marquis, A. B., Principal, 
Greek, Latin and Mathematics. 
Mrs. Jno. S. Marquis, 
Assistant Principal. 
Rev. Thos. H. Ayers, A. B., 
Latin, Literature and Rhetoric. 
Miss Julia A. Schauble, 
History and Physical Geography. 
Grammar School Department. 
Miss Julia A. Schauble, 
Fourth Year. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 53 

Miss Julia E. McLure, 

Third Year. 

Mrs. Flora D. Palmer, 

Second Year. 

Miss Mary H. Moore, Miss Annie M. Donaldson, 

First Year. 

Miss Martha W. Miller, 

Sewing Teacher. 

Number of students 168. 

flary Potter riemorial School, Oxford, N. C. 

FACULTY 1897-98. 

Rev. G. C. Shaw, Principal, 

Instructor of Classes in Normal Department. 

Mrs. G. C. Shaw, 

Instructor in Grammar Department. 

Miss E. A. V. Dudley, 

Instructor in Intermediate Department and Instrumental 

Music. 

Miss K. N. Hughes, 

Instructor in Primary Department and Vocal Music. 

Mrs. G. C. Shaw, 

Matron and Instructor in Sewing. 

Miss Jessie Speed, 

Assistant Instructor in Sewing. 

Total number of students for the present school year, 210. 



Ibietorical Sketch- 



Biddle University, Charlotte, N. C, is the outgrowth of 
what was at first and lor a number of years, known as Biddle 
Memorial Institute. At the elose of the war between the 
States, which resulted in the emancipation of the colored 
people of the South, a few consecrated Christian missionaries 
— among them Rev. S. C. Alexander, now of Millerstown, 
Pa., and Rev. W. G. Miller — who were engaged ingathering 
the colored people into churches, appreciating the pressing 
demands for a school in which the future leaders of the peo- 
ple might be trained, and foreseeing in some measure the 
possibilities of the future of such an institution, amid such 
favorable surroundings, set about devising such plans as 
would secure the desired results. 

The Presbytery of Catawba had been formed, and the 
movement for the School was formally inaugurated by the 
Presbytery at a meeting in the old Charlotte Presbyterian 
church, corner of D and 4th Streets in that city, April 7th, 
1867. A plan of the Institute was adopted, and Revs. S. C. 
Alexander and W. G. Miller were elected teachers in said 
Institution to be associated equally in the conduct and manage- 
ment of the same. Rev. W. G. Miller was sent as a com- 
missioner to the General Assembly that year. He was 
authorized by the Presbytery, with the advice and consent of 
the General Assembly's Committee on Freedmen, to act as 
financial agent for the Institution during the Summer follow- 
ing. In the meantime the organization and conduct of the 
infant Institution as well as the erection of a suitable build- 
ing was placed in charge of Rev. Mr. Alexander, who was 
then on the ground with his family. These were the first 
steps toward the realization of the idea of an Institution for 
the purpose of training colored men in this region, which 
had been in contemplation for more than a year previous, 



MDDLE UNIVERSITY. 55 

but which had been held in abeyance by the want of funds. 

Some months previous the matter had been brought to 
the notice of Mrs. Mary D. Biddle, an excellent Christian lady 
of Philadelphia, Pa., who had noted an appeal on behalf of the 
work in one of the Church papers, and who pledged $1,400 
for the cause. Grateful for this first and generous contribu- 
tion, the colored people themselves, who had learned that 
her late husband had yielded his valuable life in the cause of 
Union and human freedom, requested of Mrs. Biddle the 
privilege of perpetuating his memory in connection with this 
school, which was granted; and accordingly it was named 
u The Biddle Memorial Institute," and was subsequently 
chartered by the Legislature of North Carolina under that 
designation. From that time forward Mrs. Biddle has been 
an abiding and helpful friend of the School, watching its 
development and rejoicing in its growth and usefulness with 
all the solicitude of a devoted patroness. 

The first session commencing May 1, 1867, and continu- 
ing five months had 8 or 10 students. These consisted of 
discreet and pious young men (some of them not very young) 
of good ability and possessing a knowledge of the simple 
elementary branches of an education. In the primary 
branches they were under the instruction of the teachers of 
the parochial school and under Prof. Alexander's instruction 
in the Bible and Catechism. They were also employed as 
catechists and assisted in that capacity in the care of the 
churches, six of which had now been organized in the 
region around Charlotte. 

The question of a location for the Institution was a very 
perplexing one. The proposed location in the vicinity of the 
old church, in the city, was far from satisfactory. The site 
which the University now occupies was lying waste and was 
the property of Col. W. C. Myers, a wealthy citizen of Char- 
lotte. When approached he thought he could not sell the 8 
acres desired, but was willing to sell the entire tract, 130 
acres, for $3,000! That was far beyond the means at com- 
mand and the offer had to be declined, and the plan to build 



56 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

on the undesirable lot in the city was proceeded with to this 
extent: When the first load of Lumber was being removed 
to the spot the teams were met in the street by Col. Myers, 
who having learned the purpose, said, "Don't put up your 
building there, the location is not a suitable one. I will do- 
nate a site (8 acres) on the tract on the Beatty's Ford rojtd.** 
It was decided to accept it on the spot. The teams were 
turned and driven to the ground on which Biddle now stands. 
Here the hand of Providence was conspicuously manifested 
as often before and since in behalf of the Institution. The 
noble and generous-souled Col. Myers has lived to witness 
the splendid results for God and humanity of his timely act 
in behalf of a struggling and rising people. 

The late United States Senator, Zebulon B. Vance, 
should also be mentioned as contributing $50 to the cause. 

In 1867 added to Mrs. Biddle's gifts was that of $10,000 
in several appropriations from the Freedmen's Bureau which 
completed the Institute building, 54x50, two professors' 
houses, a students' domitory, stable, a fence around the 
grounds and sunk a well. All was complete and ready to be 
occupied in August, 1869, just 25 years ago, when the work 
was fully organized. 

In the Spring of 1869 Rev. Mr. Miller removed to 
Statesville and his connection with the school became mere- 
ly nominal until December of the same year when his rela- 
tion thereto wholly ceased. 

Under Professor Alexander the school was opened in the 
new accommodations, the latter part of September of the 
same year. He organized the School in two Departments — a 
preparatory in which pupils in primary studies were received 
from Charlotte and surrounding country, and a higher de- 
partment in which those who were under training with a 
view to teaching and preaching were instructed. 

In September 1869, Rev. Wm. Alexander, a brother of 
Rev. S. C. Alexander, now Dr. Alexander of the Theologi- 
cal Seminary, of San Rafael, California, was elected the first 
President of Biddle Institute but he declined, having 1 received 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 57 

and accepted a call to the church at San Jose, Col. Rev. S. 
Mattoon, D. D., was then elected, and heacccepted the Pres- 
idency. He assumed the duties of his long and successful 
career in the Presidency of the Institution in February, 1870, 
Rev. S. C. Alexander continued in the Institution until May. 
1871, when he terminated his connection with Biddle Insti- 
tute and the work among the colored people of the South. 
It has been seen that Rev. S. C. Alexander bore a devoted 
and conspicuous part in laying deep and strong the founda- 
tions of Biddle University. Referring to this in a recent 
letter, Rev. Mr. Alexander says: "Five years of my 
Ufe I gave to this work in its most critical and trying period, 
and especially to laying the foundation of your now noble 
University. They were trying years, full of self-denying 
work and calling for constant patience and prayer; but I 
was wonderfully supported by divine grace, and never for a 
moment lost faith in its utmost success. I never felt serious, 
ly the pressure of southern white opposition or contempt. 
My conviction of the essential righteousness of the work and 
of the Master's favor in it, rendered me proof against any- 
thing of that kind. I only deplored what seemed to hinder 
or retard the work, and nothing more than the apathy and 
want of liberality on the part of its friends North." 

Rev. S. C. Logan, D. D., now of Scranton, Pa., was cor- 
responding secretary of the Freedmen's Committee 
of the Presbyterian Church during the years covering the 
infancy of the Institution, and in that capacity took a lead- 
ing part in establishing the work. 

The burning of Dr. Mattoon's house in the fall of 1879 
was not only a material loss, but resulted in a loss of the offi- 
cial records of the school. It seems, however, that from that 
period forward a persistent and successful effort was made to 
raise the standard of scholarship in the school, so that at pres- 
ent, as indicated in the annual catalogue (and what is put 
therein is being taught,) the curriculum holds a reputable rank 
among those of similar institutions elsewhere. Under the emi- 
nently successful presidency of Dr. Mattoon, seconded, sup- 



58 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

ported and aided in it all by that "noblest women of them all," 
Mrs. M. L. Mattoon, three things were accomplished, namely: 
The prejudices of the community against the school were 
largely overcome and opposition was changed to friendship, 
Secondly, the policy adopted by his predecessors of develop- 
ing an evangelistic work with the growth of the school was 
broadened and deepened. Thirdly, the material resources of 
the institution were greatly strentghened and the facilities 
enlarged. 

In this connection, Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D. D., late 
a Professor of Hebrew and Greek in Biddle, now principal 
of the Collegiate and Normal Institute at Asheville, N. C, 
should receive a just mede of praise for the conspicuous and 
successful part borne by him in securing the main building 
of the University, which is the crowning glory of its mate- 
rial appointments. Under this administration should be 
mentioned also two other excellent men who left their im- 
press upon Biddle and the young men brought under their 
influence. The one is the late Rev. J. H. Shedd, D. D., a mis- 
sionary in Persia. He brought to the work a completeness of 
scholarship and a Christian zeal, whose influence still lingers 
among us in a marked manner. The other is Rev. Robert M. 
Hall, A. M., now a pastor at Plymouth, 111. A scholar of fine 
attianments, a Christian of deep and fervent piety, Mr. Hall 
is a man of childlike simplicity and withal a consistent and ter 
rible opponent of wrong. 

Prof. George L. White impressed himself upon the life 
of Biddle by the reforms made in the Boarding Department of 
the school, which remains substantially as planned by him. 

A number of other teachers served long and well under 
Dr. Mattoon. 

In 1884 Rev. W. A. Halliday was elected President to 
succeed Dr. Mattoon. His administration was short and 
uneventful. 

Dr. Halliday was succeeded by Rev. W. F. Johnson, 
D. D. , whose administration is especially noted for the high- 
er elevation still of the standard of scholarship in the school. 

The present administration came in June 1, 1891. 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 59 

The charter of the Institution was changed by the Leg- 
islature of North Carolina in 1883 and it became "Biddle 
University," with the property vested in a Board of Trus- 
tees, and a clause in said charter making it the perpetual 
heritage of the colored people in connection with the Pres- 
byterian Church. 

As to the character, work and influence of the grad- 
uates of Biddle, it must suffice to refer the reader to the list 
of the graduates printed in the General Catalogue in con- 
nection with whom should be considered the hundreds who 
have attended upon the classes of the Institution without 
graduating. 

Six of the Alumni are members of the present Faculty 
of the Institution. 

And as to the present status and outlook of Biddle Uni- 
versity, the reader is referred to the Annual Catalogue in 
the preceeding pages. * 



General Catalogue of Graduates. 



Scbool of ftbeolOG?. 

Class of '72. 

NAME. WORK. POST-OFFICE. 

B F McDowell Minister and Teacher Greenville, S C 
Calvin McCurdy Honorably Retired Rome, Ga 

Eli Walker Minister Red Springs, N C 

Class of '74. 

Matthew Ijams ...... Minister Lowell, N C 

* Class of '76. 

M G Haskins Minister and Teacher . Mebane, N C 

Class of '77. 

P G Lowrie Minister and Teacher ...Wadesboro, N C 

B F Russell* Minister .Blackstock, S C 

John G Murray Minister . . . Mooresville, N C 

Class of '8o. 

J P Crawford, A M . Minister Marion, S C 

James A Rainey. . . .Minister. . (Deceased) 

Class of '8 1. 

J C Simmons, A B . Minister Cheraw, S C 

RP Wyche, D D. Minister Charlotte, N C 

A D Waugh, A M. Minister Charlotte, N C 

Class of '82. 

A C Johnson, A B . Minister Mayesville, S C 

D R Stokes, A B .Teacher Texas 

Adam Frayer, A B . Minister Charleston, S. C 

Class of '83. 
W A Alexander AM. Minister Brooklyn N Y 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 61 

M J Seabrook, B. SL Minister Sumter, S C 

TA Attles, AB (Deceased, '90) 

E H Garland, A B. Minister Texas 

IF Miller Minister White Oak, SO 

Class of '84. 

W E Partee DD. . Minister Jacksonville, Fla 

G S Leeper AM.. Minister . . . Gastonia, N C 

I D Davis, A M. . ..Minister Goodwill, S C 

Class of '85. 

D Brown, D D . ■. . . Minister Charleston, S C 

G W White Minister Bamberg, S C 

Class of '87. 

A F Graham, B S .Minister. . . . .. ... Charlotte, N C 

F B Perry, A M... (Deceased) 

S F Young, BS. . . Minister .Horse Pasture, Va 

WH Shepperson .. Minister Ashland, Va 

PG Drayton.AB. Professor and Minister. Biddle Univer'ty 

Class of '88. 

N Bell Minister Huntersville, NC 

J W King Minister Monroe, N C 

B F Murray, B S . . Minister Cleveland, N C 

F L Brodie Minister Due West, S C 

A U Frierson, D D. Professor and Minister Biddle University 
B L Glenn Minister Newnan, Ga 

Class of '80. 

EW Carpenter, A B. Minister Madison, Ga 

I E Hardy .Minister Fountain Inn, S C 

S F Wentz, A B. . Minister Statesville, N C 

A M Caldwell Minister .Greensboro, Ga 

Wm Hairston, B S. Minister Biddleville, N C 

Jos. Williams, A B. Minister Greenwood, S C 

Class of 'oo. 
A J Tate, AB...-., Minister Greensboro, N C 

Class of '91. 

D D Davis Minister Carlisle, S C 

L J Melton Minister Charlotte, NC 



62 KIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

J A Ramsuer, B S. .Minister Sanford, X ( ! 

J O'Neal Knox, B S. Minister Charlotte. N ( ! 

J M Caldwell Minister Pee Dee, N ( ! 

S J Hargrave, A B.Minister, A M E Z Ch.Maxton, N C 
S G Taylor Minister Pineville, N C 

Class of 92. 

IM Muldrow, A B (Deceased) 

D W Aiken Minister Winnsboro, S ( ! 

S F Frazier Minister Riceboro, Ga 

P W Moone Minister Laurens, S C 

T L Toatley Minister Fort Mills, S C 

Class of '93. 

P W Russell, A B . . Minister Goldsboro, N C 

SC Thompson, A B.Minister Camden, S C 

Class of '94. 
E W Allen, AB. . . .Minister and Teacher ..Ridgway, S C 
H L McCrorey, A B.Minister and Professor. Biddle University 
H M Stinson, B S . .Minister Spartanburg, S C 

Class of '95. 

N N Gregg, A B Minister Lancaster, S C 

H L Peterson, A B.Minister Johnson, C. Tenn 

J A Tillman, A B . .Minister Winnsboro, S C 

C M Young, AB. . Minister Rock Hill, S C 

Class of '96. 

W P Donnell, A B.Minister Laurinburg, N C 

WBMiddleton,AB. Minister and Teacher. ..Charleston, S C 

T R Veal, SB Minister Winnsboro, S C 

D C Wilkes Minister Guthriesville, S C 

P A White, A B. . .Minister and Teacher . . Campbells v'le,Ky 

Class of '97. 

J H Cooper, SB. Minister Yorkville, S C 

Junius Gregg, A B . Minister and Teacher . . Waxhaw, N C 

J E A Jeffrey Minister Br. Guiana, S A 

J A Rollins, A B . . .Minister Walterboro, S C 

C H Shute, A B Ministe and Teacher . . . Gastonia, N C 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 63 

Class of »o8. 

A S Cottingham . . . Theological Dept Biddle University 

J H Clement Theological Dept Biddle University 

A el Jefferson, A B . Theological Dept Biddle University 

A P Johnson, A B . . Theological Dept Biddle University 

W L Metz, A B . . . . Theological Dept Biddle University 



Scbool of arte ant) Sciences, 

Class of 76. 
NAME. WORK. POST-OFFICE. 

DW Gulp, A M DD.Physician Palatka, Fla 

Class of '77. 

W I Lewis, A B Editor Jacksonville, Fla. 

J E Rattley, AM Dentist Washington, D C 

R P Wyche, A M. Minister /. . . .Charlotte, N C 

J P Crawford, A M. Minister Marion, N C 

J A Rainey Minister (Deceased) 

Class of '78. 
C C Pettey , DD. . Bp.AMEZ Church . . . Newberne, N C 

A D Waugh, A B .Minister Charlotte, N C 

D R Stokes, A B Teacher Texas 

Class of '79. 

WA Alexander, AMMinister Brooklyn, N Y 

Adam Frayer, A B.. Minister Charleston, S C 

N W Harlee, A B.. Teacher ' . . . .Dallas, Texas 

J C Simmons, A B. Minister Cheraw, S C 

Class of '8o. 

T A Attles, A B (Deceased '90) 

E H Garland, A B. .Minister Texas 

A C Johnson, A B . .Minister Mayesville, S C 

M J Seabrook, B S . . Minister Sumter, S C 

Class of '81. 

I D Davis, AM. . . .Minister Goodwill, S C 

G S Deeper, AM.. Minister Gastonia, N C 

Wm E Partee, A M . Minister Jacksonville, Fla 

RH Richardson, AB Teacher Wedgefield, S C 

Class of '82. 
R M Alexander, AM Prin. Graded School . .Spartanburg, S C 
D Brown, AM Minister Charleston, S C 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 65 

E B Craig, A B (Deceased '83) 

JFK Simpson, AM. Teacher Fayetteville, N C 

Class of '83. 

G E Davis, AM.. Prof. Bid. Univ Charlotte, N C 

P G Hammett, B S.Prin. Parochial School . Spartanburg, S C 
F M Martin, A M. .Teacher Winston, N C 

Class of '84. 

A F Graham, B S . . Minister Charlotte, N C 

F B Perry, AM (Deceased) 

HS Thompson, A B. Teacher Dallas, Texas 

S F Young, B S . . . . Minister Horse Pasture, Va 

Class of '85. 

A U Frierson, AM. Prof. Bid. Univ Charlotte, N C . 

F P Laney, A B . . . Physician Washington, D C 

J S Perry, A B . . . . Teacher Calahan, Fla 

A Robertson, A B. . Teacher Greenville, S C 

J B Sevelli, A B Editor Texas 

B F Murray, B S . Minister and Teacher . . Cleveland, N C 

Class of '86. 
E W Carpenter, AB Minister and Teacher . . Madison, Ga 

A A Dryer, A B (Deceased '86) 

Win Hairston, B S. Minister Biddleville, N C 

J Knox, B S Minister Charlotte, N C 

G J Melton (Deceased '90) 

S F Wentz, AB.. Minister Statesville, N C 

J S Williams, A B . Minister Greenwood, S C 

S J Spencer, AB.. Prin. Graded School . . Texarkana, Tex 
A N Ritchie, A B . . Teacher Florida 

Class of '87. 

P H Brown, A B. Mailing Clerk Columbia, S C 

A P Buler, B S. . . .Teacher Clinton, S C 

L Hunley, A B Teacher Mocksville, N C 

Class of '88. 

J D Martin, A M. .Prof. Bid. Univ Charlotte, N C 

S B Pride, AM... Prof. Bid. Univ Charlotte, N C 



(')(5 MIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

S B Young, B S (I deceased '89) 

,1 A Ramseur, B S Minister Sanford, N C 

Class of '89. 

S ,J Hargrave, A B. Minister Maxton, X ( ' 

,J C Johnson, A B (Deceased >92) 

WTReid, AB Mail Carrier Macon, (in 

I M Muldrow (Deceased '96) 

A J Tate, A B Minister Greensboro, X ( ' 

Class of '90. 

J M Boger, A B (Deceased »94) 

P W Russell, A B. Minister Goldsboro, X C 

S C Thompson, A B. Minister Camden, S C 

RWWilliamson,ABCity Attorney Newborn, X C 

Class of '91. 

W A Byrd, A B Minister Newbern. N C 

H L Peterson, A B. Minister JohnsonCityTenn 

J A Tillman, A B . . Minister Winnsboro, 8 C 

C M Young, A B Minister ... Rock Hill, S C 

N N Gregg, AB.. Minister Lancaster, S C 

H B Rice, A B RMS Columbia, S C 

W A Walker, A B. Teacher Union, S C 

Class of '92. 
HLMcCrorey,AB.Min., Prof. Bid. Univ. Charlotte, NC 
R L Douglass, A B.Prof. Col. State Col. .. Orangeburg, S C 

D S Collier, AB.. Minister Gaffney, S C 

J P Woolridge, AB. Minister Troy, S C 

E W Allen, AB Minister Ridgway, S C 

H M Stinson, SB.. Minister Spartanburg, S C 

Class of '93. 
J J Robinson, A B Medical Department. Howard Univ. 

W H Morrow, A B. Minister Milburn, N Y 

T H Ayers, A B. Minister and Professor. Chester, S C 

L B Ellerson, A B. . Minister Manning, S C 

G E Caesar, A B. Minister Lexington, N C 

W P Donnell, A B , Minister Laurinburg, N C 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 67 

T R Veal, A B Minister Buckhead, 8 C 

W B Middleton,. Minister and Teacher . Charleston, S C 

J H Cooper, A B . . Minister Yorkville, S C 

P G Drayton, A B. Minister and Professor. Biddle University 
J H Hutton, A B . . Medical Department. . Howard Univ. 

Class of '94. 

J E Bowman, A B . Teacher In Florida. 

A P Allison, A B . . Teacher Greenville, S C. 

W D Hood, A B Baptist minister Spring Hill, S C. 

J A Rollins, A B Minister Walterboro, S C. 

C H Shute, A B . . Minister and Teacher . . Gastonia, N C. 

A James, A B Teacher , Brogden, S C. 

H H Muldrow Teacher In Florida. 

Junius Gregg, A B . Minister and Teacher . Waxhaw, N C. 
J M Vaughn, A B Med Dept How'd Univ Washington, D C, 
S M Plair, A B . . . . Teacher St Augustine, Fla 

Class of '95. 
J H Clement ....... Theological School .... Biddle University 

J E Harris, A B Eastfield, N C. 

J P Harrison, A B 

A J Jefferson, A B . Theological School .... Biddle University 
A P Johnson, A B Theological School ... Biddle University 

S B McLamb, B S Lincoln Univ. 

W L Metz, A B . . . Theological School . . Biddle University 

C E Radford, B S. .Teacher Mt Airy, N C. 

D E Speed, A B 

W H Stinson, A B . Teacher Beaufort, S C. 

J WStitt, BS 

G Wadsworth, A B Teacher 

F H Watkins, A B. Teacher Erie Mills, N C. 

Class of '96. 

R J Boulware Teacher '. . . .Flint Hill, S C. 

H H Cardwel I, A B . Teacher Abbeville, S C. 

W H Carroll, A B. Theological School. . . .Biddle University 

W M Flowers, A B Knoxville, Tenn. 

S J Grier, A B . . . . Theological School .... Biddle University 



68 BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

J M Henderson, A BTeacher Kinston, N ( . 

J A Pethel, A B. . .Medical Student Howard Univ. 

A W Scott, A B . . . Lawyer Wilmington, X ( '. 

J H Sampson, A B. Theological School . . . .Biddle University 

J W Watkins, A B. Leonard Med School 

J E Westberry, B STeacher MechanicsvilleSC 

Class of '97. 

F J Anderson, A B . Theological School .... Biddle University 

W R Conners, A B.Prof S N School Salisbury, X C. 

W C Coles, A B . . .Teacher Aiken, S C. 

T J Coles, A B . . . . Printer Charlotte, X C 

M J Jackson, A B. .Theological School .... Biddle University 

W T Singleton, A BTeacher Charlotte, N C. 

J E Smith, A B.. . .F'm'n. AMEZPubH'seCharlotte, X C 

I D L Torrence, A B. Teacher Huntersville, X' C 

—129— 



preparatory an& IRormal School. 



Class of '88. 

NAME. WORK. POST-OFFICE. 

E W Allen Minister and Teacher. .Ridgway, S C 

D S Collier Minister and Teacher. . Gaffney, S C 

J H Cooper Minister Yorkville, S C 

F S Frazier Minister Riceboro, Ga 

J R Malloy Teacher 

S S McKoy Teacher Laurinburg, N C 

W H Mumford (Deceased) 

J M McGriff Teacher Winnsboro, S C 

W F Richie Teacher Florida 

Wm Thompson (Deceased) 

T L Toatley Minister Fort Mill, S C 

J P Woolridge .... Minister Troy, S C 

Class of '89. 

T H Ayers Minister and Teacher .. Chester, S C 

G E Caesar Minister Lexington, N C 

W P Donnell Minister Laurinburg, N C 

L B Ellerson Minister Manning, S C 

I L Harris 

J H Hutton Medical Department . . Howard Univ. 

T R Veal Minister Buckhead, S C 

F O Johnson 

H C Lyttles Teacher Coddle Creek, NC 

Win Means Teacher Winnsboro, S C 

W H Morrow Minister and Teacher . . Kilburn, N Y 

W B Middleton .... Minister and Teacher . . Charleston, S C 

J A Rollins Minister Walterboro, S C 

C E Radford Teacher Mt. Airy, N C 

J J Robinson Medical Department . . Howard Univ. 



TO BIDDLK I'NIVKKSITV. 

C L Sawyer Savannah, Gra 

L) C Stubbs Bennetteville,8C 

J J L Taylor U. S. Army 

F W Thompson (Deceased) 

E O Woodward. . . .Meharry Med. School .Nashville. Tenn 

Class of '90. 

S F Frazier Minister Riceboro, Gra 

J E Graham Concord. N ( ! 

Junius Gregg Minister and Teacher . . Waxhaw, N ( 

W D Hood Minister Ridge Spring. S ( ! 

Anderson James. . .Teacher South Carolina 

W T Johnson Wilmington, N C 

J J Jordan Rock Hill. S ( ! 

M R McCain Teacher Walkup. N C 

J J Agurs Teacher Chester, S C 

A P Allison Teacher Greenville, S C 

B B Benjamin Teacher Sardinia, S C 

J E Bowman Teacher Florida 

J A Ellerbe Cheraw, S C 

C S McFadden Teacher Sardinia, S C 

S B McLamb Theological Dept Lincoln Univ. 

C S McMillan Laurinburg. N C 

H H Muldrow Teacher Florida 

S M Plair Teacher Florida 

J M Steele Rock Hill, S C 

J W Stitt Blacksburg, S C 

C H Shute Minister Gastonia, N C 

J M Vaughan Medical Department. ..Howard Univ. 

C F Woolridge . Minister Bradley's, S C 

Class of '91. 

H H Cardwell . . . Teacher Abbeville, S C 

J H Clement Theological School .... Biddle University 

R C Duncan (Deceased) 

J E Harris Eastfield, N C 

J P Harrison Teacher North Carolina 

A J Jefferson Theological School . . . .Biddle University 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 71 

A P Johnson Theological School .... Biddle University 

W L Metz Theological School .... Biddle University 

Win Pressley 

DE Speed/ 

W H Stinson Teacher Beaufort, S C 

Guy Wadsworth . . . Teacher South Carolina 

J W Watkins Medical School Shaw University 

F H Watkins Teacher Erie Mills, N C 

J S Tyler Brickmason Charlotte, N C 

C C Thompson Printer Lincolnton, N C 

A L Montgomery Farmer Paw Creek, N C 

W M Malloy . . .' 

A L Martin Minister King's Mt., N C 

Class of '92. 

R J Boulware Teacher Flint Hill, S C 

AV H Carroll Theological School . . . .Biddle University 

W M Flowers Nashville, Tenn 

S J Grier Theological School .... Biddle University 

J M Henderson . . . .Teacher Kinston, N C 

J A Pethel Medical Department . Howard Univ. 

A W Scott Lawyer Wilmington, N C 

J H Sampson Theological School .... Biddle University 

J W Westbrook 

J E Westberry Teacher M'ch'nicsville, SC 

E E Evans 

B B Funderburk . . . Farmer Cheraw, S C 

T M Elrod Piedmont, S C 

Class of '93. 

F J Anderson Theological School .... Biddle University 

H W Bates (Deceased). 

W R Conners Prof S N School Salisbury, N C. 

E W Ellis Farmer Due West, S C. 

L Fielder School of A and S . . . . Biddle University 

J J Frazier Merchant Charlotte, N C. 

E W Gregg Farmer Sumter, S C. 

M J Jackson Theological School .... Biddle University 



72 BIDDLE IM\ EB8ITY. 

M H Lewis (Deceased). 

G A Morrow School of A and S . . . . Biddle University 

J E Powe Shaw University 

F C Sadgwar, Jr. . . Carpenter Wilmington, X ( \ 

W T Singleton Teacher Charlotte, N C. 

J E Smith F'm'n AMEZ Pub H'seCharlotte, N < . 

W H Spann Lincoln University 

I D L Torrence . . . .Teacher Huntersville,X C. 

S L Young Theological School .... Biddle University 

Class of '94. 

Z Alexander Charlotte, N C. 

J R Alsobrooks 

F M Boulware Farmer Flint Hill, S C. 

E C Byers School of A and S . . . . Biddle L T niversity 

L B Cooper School of A and S . . . Biddle University 

T E Craig School of A and S ... . Biddle University 

T H Davis Carpenter Biddle University 

Z A Dockery School of A and S . . . . Biddle University 

J E Tice. 

T J Frierson School of A and S . Biddle University 

Hugh Harry School of A and S . . Biddle University 

W L Hudson School of A and S . . . . Biddle University 

J M Johnson School of A and S . . . Biddle University 

L W Johnson 

J A Lightner, M D Chester, S C 

I M Martin School of A and S . . . . Biddle University 

J L Massey 

W L McNair, D Ph Laurinburg, N C. 

J C McNeill Red Springs, N C. 

S I Moone School of A and S . . . Biddle University 

J W Young Shelby, N C. 

J W Morrison. Teacher and Farmer. Cureton's Store. 

T W Nance Teacher Yorkville, S C. 

I H Russell Theological School. . . Biddle University 

J E Walker School of A and S . . . Biddle University 

B M Ward Lincoln University 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 73 

J H Warren Barber Charlotte, N C. 

F Watson Farmer Nottaway, Va. 

DF White 

R E Williams School of A and S . . . . Biddle University 

R A Wilson 

Class of '95. 

C E Aiken (Deceased) 

C E Alexander Sch. of Arts& Sciences Biddle University 

J R Baker Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

W R Coles, Jr. .... Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

J A Croom . . ;. Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

T G Jenkins 

C N Jenkins Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

C B Johnson Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

J E Mebane Merchant Durham, N C 

W A Pethel Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

G R Spaulding Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

Lloyd Spaulding . . . Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 
Geo F Wilson Teacher Madison, Ga 

Class of '06. 

W H Ancrum Teacher Charlotte, N C 

C J Baker Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

W M Barnwell 

M C Cooper Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

E E Drinkwater 

S L Fulwood Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

H B Grigg Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

W A Grigg Charlotte, N C ; 

W C Har grave .... Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

R B Henderson .... Teacher Huntersville, N C 

J M Harleston Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

J D Howie Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

C R Means Lincoln University 

J J Mason Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

E W Murray Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

J A Patterson 



74 DIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

J S Patton Carpenter Greenwood, SO 

J L Scott Barber Danville, Va 

A A Thomas 

Jacob Thompson. . .Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

W H Wright 

Class of '97. 

J R Barber Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

E P Brown Brooklyn, N Y 

A D Bruen Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

E G Bumpass (Deceased) 

W M Caldwell Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

D T Caldwell Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

Wm Dubose Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

W B Gillard Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

W A Gilmore Teacher L. Turnout. SC 

C F Green Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

W J Green Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

J C Hargrave 

E G Haskins Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

J W Jamerson Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

J R S Jeffrey Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

W A Jenkins Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

R E Jones .Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

J R Logan Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

C W Maxwell Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

E J McLeod. . . ..Leonard Medical Sch. .Raleigh, N C 

L A McLeod 

J R Pearson Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

T A Scott Wilmington, N C 

P D Smith Brooklyn, N Y 

G W Thompson 

W O Thompson Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

T R Vanderhost Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

R A Walker Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

Columbus White. . . .Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 
W S C Wynne Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 75 

J E Young Sch. of Arts & Sciences Biddle University 

—202— 



SUMMARY. 

School of Theology 79 

School of Arts and Sciences 129 

Normal and Preparatary School 202 

Total Amount of Graduates 410 



INDEX. 

General Matters. page. 

Board of Trustees 2 

The Faculty 3 

Summary of Students 35 

Home Department 30 

General Information 37-41 

Wants of the Institution 42 

Conclusion 43-46 

Rules and Regulations 46, 47 

Time Table 48 

Calendar 49 

Lectures Extraordinary 50 

Affiliated Schools 51 

Historical Sketch 54 

General Catalogue of Graduates 60 

School of Theology. 

Faculty 4 

Classes 4,5 

Course of Instruction 5,6 

Schedule Recitations and Lectures 7 

Syllabi 7-10 

Information 11, 12 

School of Arts and Sciences. 

Faculty 13 

Courses and Degrees, and Terms of Admission 13 

Classical Course 14, 15 

Scientific Course 16, 17 

Schedule Recitations and Lectures 17 

Syllabi ' 18-21 

Classes 21-23 

Information 24 

Preparatory and Normal School. 

Faculty 25 

Terms of Admission 25 

Classical Course 26 

Scientific Course 27 

Schedule of Recitations 28 

Classes 28-32 

School of Industries. 

Superintendent, Foremen, Trades, etc 33-35 



UNIVERSITY OF III i N n,.„». 

liiiiiii 

J 0112 111993041